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Has Your Reaction To Gluten Changed?
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I ask this because I'm newly diagnosed and I have very mild symptoms, apparently.  Just wondering, from those of you who have been gluten-free for a while now, when you do get accidentaly "glutenized," has your reaction gotten worse, not as bad, or is it unchanged?  Is it always the same reaction?  I'm weirdly kind of hoping I get a little more of a reaction (but not too much!) simply so I can be aware when I've accidentally ingested gluten. It seems like there's a lot of "see what your body tolerates" when it comes to some of the grey area products. (soaps and shampoos, makeup, oats etc.)

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Don't worry you will know when you've been glutened! Ive been gluten-free since November now and although I am generally fine with the food I have cooked myself, I still keep glutening myself with things I think should be gluten free but turn out not to be. My last one was from a glass of fruit juice... First think I get is a burning sensation in my tummy which turns into constant tummy ache which could last for two days, at the same time I get blisters inside my mouth, shooting pain in my joints, spinning head, exhaustion, terrible mood.... And this lasts for days or weeks. Juice does not naturally have gluten, but often they add fiber to it to am e it more healthy.... and this tends to be wheat based. Disaster for any individual with gluten intolerance! Yes, my reactions have become worse since I have become gluten-free and also I seem to react to the tiniest amounts, even a breadcrum .... But individuals react differently- Becoming gluten-free is such a steep learning curb!! Good luck and remember we are here to encourage you along!

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Before my diagnosis I was asymptomatic - no intestinal issues, no nothing.  I've been gluten-free since the beginning of Oct. and 3 months into it I accidentally glutened myself with a tiny, tiny taste of tabuli - that had bulgar wheat in it (we got it mixed up with the quinoa salad) - anyhow... I had a definite, recognizable reaction.  Bloating 3 hours after ingestion (as in I looked 5 months pregnant - and I'm normally very slim), then woke up with the clammy, sweaty chills like you'd get with food poisoning or the flu.  Was exhausted for a good 3 days and generally "off" for close to a week.  And very irritable.

 

So I went from no symptoms to food poisoning-like symptoms in the matter of 3 months.

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My symptoms before gluten free were non-distinct and constant.  I had especially bloating, mind fog, and fatigue.  Now when I get glutened I notice swelling, bloating, cramping, and have diarreah four days later.  I am really thankful that my symptoms now come in go with more gusto.  I am absolutely motivated to avoid gluten.

 

D

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Like desperateladysaved said, I think we just notice reactions a bit more because we are in a healthier place.

 

Think of health as a ladder. When we are in good health we are higher on the ladder. When in poor health we are lower on the ladder. When we get glutened it knocks us down to lower health. If we were already low on the ladder, the fall isn't noticeable but when we are higher up, we feel the fall more.

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Thanks everyone.  This makes perfect sense and in an odd way I'm glad to know I'll probably have distinct symptoms once I'm sucessfully gluten free.  I think it's pretty much necessary to keep motivated and to understand my body and how safe the foods are that I'm eating.

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I ask this because I'm newly diagnosed and I have very mild symptoms, apparently.  Just wondering, from those of you who have been gluten-free for a while now, when you do get accidentaly "glutenized," has your reaction gotten worse, not as bad, or is it unchanged?  Is it always the same reaction?  I'm weirdly kind of hoping I get a little more of a reaction (but not too much!) simply so I can be aware when I've accidentally ingested gluten. It seems like there's a lot of "see what your body tolerates" when it comes to some of the grey area products. (soaps and shampoos, makeup, oats etc.)

This is an interesting question.

 

I get so very sick and have to stay in bed the entire next day and then am tired and foggy headed for two more. Sometimes I think I am *too* careful but then I remember how horrible it is when I let my guard down. I can look back at my old food journal and am amazed at the symptoms I had that i had no idea were gluten related.

 

I always wonder how some folks who are celiac can tolerate so much more gluten than I can. Isn't it still hurting them? Can a body tolerate a certain amount before any damage takes place? 

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    • Here is another point.  My hubby went gluten-free per the poor advice of his GP and my allergist.  It worked.  A tough first year, but he got well.  Thirteen years later, I got diagnosed with celiac disease.  I was shocked!  😱.   Does he have celiac disease?  We will never know because we can not afford to have him do a challenge.  He refuses and I can not blame him.  He knows he will be very sick!   The point?  I am so lucky that we both can not have gluten.  I never worry about him making me sick or vice versa. We made the house completely gluten free for  1) our health and 2) the fact that our kid started helping in the kitchen. Kids make mistakes and I personally need a safe haven.  She wants gluten?  I buy prepackaged stuff and she takes it to school.  All parties and events at my house are gluten free.  Lots of work, but we stay healthy.  She does not have celiac disease.  When she is preparing for a celiac test,  I send her on the porch to eat cookies or bread or whatever floats her boat.  We travel in a gluten-free RV.  I have five sizes of ice chests.  We just have to be prepared for any event.   How can we live this way?   We love feeling good.
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