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Iodine Patch Test (To See If You Need Iodine Supplement) Uncorn People May Need This One.
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43 posts in this topic

Years ago, I got this idea from Dr. David William's newsletter.  At the time it really helped me.  I forgot all about it until I had my thyroid tested and discovered that I had low hormone levels. 

 

To see if you need more iodine:

 

Do after showering or washing for the day.

Take some topical iodine and paint a quarter size amount on your SKIN. 

Check the spot in 24 hours, if it is still there, forget about it.

If the spot has disappeared, you need an iodine supplement., or you washed or rubbed it away!

If one does the test for a few days, or begins supplements, the spot should absorb more slowly as time passes.  I had one go 2 or 3 days when I tried this years back.

 

If you need an iodine supplement I have been using Mother Earth Minerals, INC. and it has been well.  This is safe to use by mouth.  The topical (first aid) kind isn't safe by mouth.  That is important to note since it is poisonous!

 

I mentioned people that avoid iodized salt because of the magnesium stearate (corn product) in it.    If you don't use iodized salt, I think it is quite possible that you need iodine.  My current guess is that celiac disease causes difficulty absorbing iodine just as it does with other nutrients.  In my OWN (Natural Life Personhood) OPINION one would want to try adding iodine supplement before using drugs for low thyroid.  If you care to, ask your doctor first.  Your beliefs or circumstances may be different.  My thyroid problem was only borderline low, and not yet clinical.

 

I hope that others can avoid being deficient in iodine and that some thyroids can get back to work in a strong way. 

 

D

 

 

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Personally, if I thought I had an iodine issue, I would seek medical treatment. I would get a real test from a real doctor for it. Then I would take supplements, if needed. It's not really something to mess around with. Too much iodine is bad, too. Fortunately, it looks like you can't absorb much iodine thru your skin. So, a little dab on your arm shouldn't hurt.

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http://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Iodine-QuickFacts/

 

I would never try to supplement with iodine unless I was sure I was deficient. 

 

Iodine deficiency is uncommon in the United States and Canada. 

Most people in the United States get enough iodine from foods and beverages. However, certain groups of people are more likely than others to have trouble getting enough iodine:

  • People who do not use iodized salt. Adding iodine to salt is the most widely used strategy to control iodine deficiency. Currently, about 70% of households worldwide use iodized salt.
  • Pregnant women. Women who are pregnant need about 50% more iodine than other women to provide enough iodine for their baby. Surveys show that many pregnant women in the United States may not get quite enough iodine, although experts do not know whether this affects their babies.
  • People living in regions with iodine-deficient soils who eat mostly local foods. These soils produce crops that have low iodine levels. Among the regions with the most iodine-poor soil are mountainous areas, such as the Himalayas, the Alps, and the Andes regions, as well as river valleys in South and Southeast Asia.
  • People who get marginal amounts of iodine and who also eat foods containing goitrogens. Goitrogens are substances that interfere with the way the body uses iodine. They are present in some plant foods including soy, and cruciferous vegetables such as cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower and Brussels sprouts. For most people in the United States who get adequate amounts of iodine, eating reasonable amounts of foods containing goitrogens is not a concern.
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Actually, the way skin absorption works - everyone will absorb the same amount of iodine - deficient or not.

Also, too much iodine can cause thyroid issues, too. I had to go low iodine for a while for my thyroid.

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As someone with DH, the idea of intentionally placing iodine on my skin makes me shudder :ph34r:

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As someone with DH, the idea of intentionally placing iodine on my skin makes me shudder :ph34r:

 

Ah Chilly girl. I was waiting for someone with DH to chime in here. I knew it would not be long.  ^_^

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Ah Chilly girl. I was waiting for someone with DH to chime in here. I knew it would not be long.  ^_^

Irish my lovely :wub: good to see you ,hope all is well :)

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My doctor has me taking a few drops of iodine per day but it is a low amount below the RDA. It sounds like you would have to go fairly high to have the possible side effects of subclinical hypothyroidism or a thyroid storm.

 

This Mercola site mentions a skin patch type of test too. http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2012/02/08/iodine-is-important-but-new-study-shows-too-much-causes-problems.aspx

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Irish my lovely :wub: good to see you ,hope all is well :)

 

All IS well, dear Chill! I moved to Florida and the warmth makes this girl very happy.

 

Great to see you! I have missed you, but I figured you are off living your life as you should. You had a LONG journey, dear girl.

 

You will notice your response has prompted 5 votes up.....meaning others, possibly with DH or just ones who know that supplementing' anything without a base level or a diagnosis or a doctor's guidance is not wise. I am always fearful of people taking supps such as this without guidance or cause.

 

Thanks for posting and for being a presence on this forum. xx

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I still don't understand this iodine" test". Does this mean no one has enough iodine? I have never had yellow stuff come out of my skin. Wouldn't we be leaving yellow spots on towels and dishes, etc?

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I still don't understand this iodine" test". Does this mean no one has enough iodine? I have never had yellow stuff come out of my skin. Wouldn't we be leaving yellow spots on towels and dishes, etc?

 

I searched "dr/ mercola's" site..... and it led me to Dr David Brownstein....which led me to this:

 

http://healthwyze.org/index.php/component/content/article/54-iodine-supplementation.html

 

which states:

 

"Dr. Guy E. Abraham and his close partner Dr. David Brownstein have been repeatedly quoted and cited by the quacks of iodine drinking as "the experts" on this topic; so it is worth a moment to discuss them. Brownstein wrote an entire book about drinking iodine, and Abraham's faithful point to his credentials as a professor and a former M.D. However, their therapies are not even endorsed by their own establishment. In previous times, they were both a willing part of a medical system that routinely gives children radioactive iodine to virtually destroy any chance of them having a long and healthy life.

"Want to join the experiment? If you are already taking iodine click here to become a member, or Order a bottle for $40 to try it out for yourself!"

-- Dr. Guy E. Abraham

Elemental iodine is quite useful as a topical antiseptic, and topical applications eliminate a plethora of health issues wrought by iodine deficiencies. However, elemental iodine can quickly become toxic when orally consumed, for it is so difficult to not overdose. It is always safe when it organically occurs in foods, such as fish. The effects of an overdose with elemental iodine mimic the central nervous system problems that are caused by well-known poisons; for instance, the metallic taste that is caused by arsenic poisoning. The iodine that is found in typical retailers is always toxic in any amount when taken orally."

 

In other words, no one should be taking oral doses of iodine. And this "credible source of alternative medicine" is where I found this information. 

 

and let us look at the disclaimer:

 

The Claimer: The information provided by this site is intended to be a truthful, corrective alternative to the advice provided by physicians and other medical professionals.  The information presented herein is intended to diagnose, treat, cure, and prevent disease.

 

??huh?? Do you all think it meant "is NOT intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent disease" ?? who is watching the websites that dispense "alternative medical" info...??

 

Just be careful, everyone.  <_<   :( 

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I'm just saying....let's use a little common sense. If this stuff is correct....either everyone in the world is severely deficient in iodine because we don't leave yellow marks..... Or this " theory" has some problems.

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I've read about that iodine patch test Diane.  I have no idea if it works or not.  Have you re-done the test since you started taking iodine and seen a difference?

I'm going to relate a little story of personal history with iodine deficiency.  Maybe it will help make sense for some people.  At one point I decided to stop eating salt in my food.  So I didn't add salt to any food for 5 years.  Turns out my vitamins pills didn't have iodine in them  either, although I didn't realize that at the time.  One day I got the idea that maybe I was flirting with iodine deficiency.  So I decided to test it.  I got an apple and sprinkled iodized salt on it while I ate it.  After 15 minutes or so I started feeling quite a rush of energy, really jazzed up.  So I ate another salty apple, and another.  After a few days of this I no longer felt a rush of energy after eating the salty apples.  I still hate apples to this day.  (Ok that part is joke, I don't hate apples).

My point is that if you are iodine deficient and hypothyroid but then correct the deficiency by taking in some iodine you will know it.  You should probably feel the difference fairly quick, if your thyroid is still functional anyway.

I don't think there is any need to go over board on taking iodine if you are eating iodized salt regularly.  Your body doesn't need massive amounts of iodine to function.  And if you really are suffering from a deficiency you will feel the effect of correcting that deficiency.  If you don't feel any difference from taking iodine I doubt you really have a serious deficiency.  In which case all you need to do is take reasonable amounts of it in your multivitamin or use iodized salt in your food.

Think about it this way.  Iodine is recommended by some people as being absolutely nessacary and critical to the proper function of the body.  So if you are really deficient in it you should be suffering symptoms of that deficiency.  And when you correct that you should feel a restoration of function and relief from symptoms quickly.  If nothing changes then you probably aren't severely deficient.  And that means you don't need to super size your iodine intake.  I do agree we need iodine of course, just not in enormous or unusual amounts.

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Thanks gluten-free in DC,

 

I can't eat iodized salt, because of the corn. (I am NOT saying that it has gluten.)  I haven't eaten iodized salt for a long time.  I couldn't figure out a couple of years back why I got reactions every time I ate out, or something processed. Than one time I accidentally bought iodized salt.  It took me a couple of weeks to figure out my fatigue was tied to using salt!   I posted about that at the time. 

 

I did start feeling those surges when I began iodine. That is when one notices a difference when they first start something they need. Just now I am not ready to say more.  I had some success in such treatment in the past but had forgotten about it.  I do remember the patch disappearing within a day in the beginning, but over time it remained for at least two or three days.  I didn't keep written records.  I hope to say more about it in the future after I know more about how it goes as time goes on.  I do have help from my Functional Medicine Nurse.  She established what would be a safe dose.  We planned how I can continue to monitor between appointments:

 

Repeat patch tests monthly

Repeat thyroid blood tests every six month.  (I wasn't clinical hypothyroid, but as close to it as one can come without treatment) SHEW!

Check blood pressure

 

This test helped me, because it caused me to be aware of my need for iodine. Certainly I agree that taking large quantities of iodine would not be safe..  I would take only a proper dose and if you need it.  Those who can't supplement with iodized salt should find another iodine source if they need it.  Iodine is a vital nutrient for your body.  One could imagine I have recently read up on it having just found out I was deficient.

 

I am pretty sure that one can get a test at the doctor to check iodine levels, if anyone has experienced that or  would like to present that I would be interested. I am also wondering if people with hypothyroid are checked for low iodine.

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 I am also wondering if people with hypothyroid are checked for low iodine.

I have thyroid issues ( hashimotos possibly crossing into graves' ) am on meds /have my thyroid checked every three months. To my knowledge ( and I get copies of every test I have :P )   I have never had my iodine levels checked

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The gluten-free/corn-free vitamins I finally found (Lifetime Iron-Free Soft Gels) has iodine in it. I too had to give up iodized salt because of the corn, and being in the middle of nowhere in the midwest, I can't get seafood, so I'm very glad I found these vitamins.

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Is hashimotos the one that is auto-immune against the thyroid?

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Is hashimotos the one that is auto-immune against the thyroid?

Yes hashimotos and graves' are both auto-immune disease of the thyroid .  (typically ) hashimotos is  hypothyroid  and graves is hyperthyroid .

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Is hashimotos the one that is auto-immune against the thyroid?

With all due respect, Diana, if you do not know that Hashimoto's thyroiditis is autoimmune thyroiditis, you should not be supplementing with iodine

without guidance from an ENDOCRINOLOGIST.

 

http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/hashimotos-disease/basics/definition/con-20030293

 

but as I recall, your thyroid tests are normal. You posted them before.

 

I have suggested this to you previously, but you seem to disregard this advice. Please. Go to a doctor who specializes in THYROID DISEASE.  You should have the proper treatment if it is necessary. 

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I don't have hashi's, so I haven't studied up on it!

 

 

? But you started the thread with this statement:

I forgot all about it until I had my thyroid tested and discovered that I had low hormone levels. 

 

 

"low hormone levels"  means reduced thyroid function or Hashi's   

 

So what exactly are you dosing with iodine for, then? This makes no sense.(unless I am missing something) 

 

As I said, if your test results indicate reduced hormone function, maybe you should see an endo?

Just in case?.

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Thanks Diane,

 

It's interesting that you saw different results after taking iodine than before.  Seems to be an indicator that it might work as a rough test anyway.  Quest does have an iodine test available.  I think someone asked about that, not sure who.

 

http://www.questdiagnostics.com/testcenter/BUOrderInfo.action?tc=16599&labCode=SJC

Clinical Significance

Iodine is an essential element that is required for thyroid hormone production. The measurement of iodine serves as an index of adequate dietary intake.

 

Barty came through with a corn free vitamin brand!  Way to go Bartful ! :)

 

Kind of sidetracking here.  Some people say you can test yourself for low stomach acid by eating beets.  Since we are  talking about alternative testing ideas I figured i'd throw that one out there.  I don't know if it works as a valid test or not,  I haven't actually tried it myself.

 

http://www.health.harvard.edu/healthbeat/changes-in-urine%E2%80%93when-to-see-the-doctor

 

http://www.celiac.com/gluten-free/topic/23130-beets-pink-urine-and-celiac-connection/

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Thanks, I have been thinking about a beet test.  I did have my urine go pink in the past and recently have began to take hcl.  If I don't see pink ( the rest of my family do not) it would be amazing!

 

Thanks Diane,

 

It's interesting that you saw different results after taking iodine than before.  Seems to be an indicator that it might work as a rough test anyway.  Quest does have an iodine test available.  I think someone asked about that, not sure who.

 

http://www.questdiagnostics.com/testcenter/BUOrderInfo.action?tc=16599&labCode=SJC

Clinical Significance

Iodine is an essential element that is required for thyroid hormone production. The measurement of iodine serves as an index of adequate dietary intake.

 

Barty came through with a corn free vitamin brand!  Way to go Bartful ! :)

 

Kind of sidetracking here.  Some people say you can test yourself for low stomach acid by eating beets.  Since we are  talking about alternative testing ideas I figured i'd throw that one out there.  I don't know if it works as a valid test or not,  I haven't actually tried it myself.

 

http://www.health.harvard.edu/healthbeat/changes-in-urine%E2%80%93when-to-see-the-doctor

 

http://www.celiac.com/gluten-free/topic/23130-beets-pink-urine-and-celiac-connection/

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I think when I start peeing rainbows I am halfway to Heaven.  But seriously, I know I pee green when I eat copious amounts of asparagus, and I pee blue after C/T scans.  If it goes in colored, it might just come out colored.  IMHO

 

Colleen

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I think when I start peeing rainbows I am halfway to Heaven.  But seriously, I know I pee green when I eat copious amounts of asparagus, and I pee blue after C/T scans.  If it goes in colored, it might just come out colored.  IMHO

 

Colleen

 

 

omg...snort....peeing rainbows... :lol:

 

I am the kind whose pee smells funny after eating asparagus. My poop is red after eating beets. Black after too much chocolate.

 

Not sure what any of this has to do with iodine patch tests, but hey, this is D's thread and since she took it down this road, I thought

maybe I'd share.

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