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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Did Celiac Cause My Diabetes?
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23 posts in this topic

I have celiac disease.  It was discovered by biopsy over 2 years ago.  My diet has been as gluten free as possible since that time.

 

A few months ago I was told I have type 2 diabetes.

 

Is it possible my celiac disease could have caused my diabetes? 

 

I've looked for months and can't find a definative answer.

 

Anyone know with certainty?

 

Thanks in advance for your help.

 

Judi

Edited by jbeyes
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I believe type 1 is the one seen with celiac. Could you have developed it due to high blood pressure or weight issues? Maybe type 2 has an autoimmune component but I'm not sure

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I have celiac disease.  It was discovered by biopsy over 2 years ago.  My diet has been as gluten free as possible since that time.

 

A few months ago I was told I have type 2 diabetes.

 

Is it possible my celiac disease could have caused my diabetes? 

 

I've looked for months and can't find a definative answer.

 

Anyone know with certainty?

 

Thanks in advance for your help.

 

Judi

 

Type 1 is autoimmune. Not sure about Type 2 and celiac disease. 

Are you sure you have Type 2? It's baffling but there are still a lot of doctors out there who mistakenly diagnose Type 2 simply because you are an adult at the time of diagnosis. 

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I don't think Celiac Disease causes diabetes, but they can be related as they can both be autoimmune and it seems they share the same genes! 

 

I've been doing some research on diabetes.  I was recently diagnosed as pre-diabetic.  Okay, I'm over 50 but I'm thin and in great shape physically.  Since I have two autoimmune disorders (celiac disease and thyroiditis), chances are I'm type 1 not type 2.  It's important to know which one you are since it affects treatment.  

 

I'm not going to sit around and wait for my beta cells to die off, so I'm thinking about going back to the doctors to for a pancreatic work-up.  I'll need an antibodies test.  That will help give me a definitive diagnosis of LADA (Latent Autoimmune Diabetes of Adults).  

 

My fasting blood glucose was 100, and my Hemoglobin A1c was 5.8.  Not bad.  Just borderline.   I have a genetic anemia, so that can affect the HA1c results.  I was not content to do a re-check in three months.  And I was not willing to give up sweets since I had already given up gluten!  

 

I purchased a cheap blood glucose monitor and strips from Target (based on Consumer reports recommendations) and began testing my blood.  Yep, consistently high fasting glucose, but still not officially "diabetic" and tested one and two hours after meals.  The results were not horrible, but not normal.  Did a test where I just ate one cup of rice and my glucose levels spiked high (over 140) at one hour and lowered but not dramatically at 2 hours.  That tells me that I more than likely have diabetes.  

 

So, back to the doctor for the antibodies test.  In the meantime, blood sugar levels are down with a very intense low carb diet.  I eat a bowl of strawberries and it raises my blood sugars dramatically!  Ugh!  

 

So, in my heart, I know I have diabetes.  There's no denying it.  I want a definitive diagnosis because I think if I have LADA which is a variation of type 1, that I'm still making some insulin and I may need to supplement (just like my thyroid) with a little insulin to prevent beta cells from completely dying out (beta cells make insulin) and making me 100% insulin dependent.  Oral meds will not work for those with LADA.  They are effective for type 2 only.  Eventually, I will probably need insulin 100% as research indicates that will happen within 6 months to five years after a diagnosis.

 

Start testing yourself.  It's just a $30 investment!  Then talk to your doctor.  

 

Take care!  

 

Good luck! 

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Ditto the advice cyclinglady gave you. I don't think type 2 is related to celiac except maybe in that the inflammation a celiac experiences may mess with your body and how it reacts to insulin.

 

... Or too many processed gluten-free "foods" that are just glucose in a pretty package.  ;)  Seriously though, gluten-free substitute foods have a horrible GI rating and can mess with your blood. They are the opposite of low carb in most cases (excluding coconut and almond flours).

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I have celiac disease.  It was discovered by biopsy over 2 years ago.  My diet has been as gluten free as possible since that time.

 

A few months ago I was told I have type 2 diabetes.

 

Is it possible my celiac disease could have caused my diabetes? 

 

I've looked for months and can't find a definative answer.

 

Anyone know with certainty?

 

Thanks in advance for your help.

 

Judi

 

I wonder if it's all part of an autoimmune package.  My celiac, diabetes and hypothyroid symptoms all started close to the same time.  My sister has all my problems but she also has autoimmune hepatitis with it.

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I am being tested this week, biopsy, for celiac.  24 years ago (I remember cuz my daughter was 2) I was diagnosed with hypothyroidism.  12 years ago (I remember cuz my favorite boss quit), type 2 diabetes.  I won't go into the other "illnesses" or symptoms that I'm reading accompany celiac and/or gluten intolerance, but I had perhaps a stupid notion that eliminating gluten at this stage of the game (regardless of the biopsy/blood tests am going to eliminate gluten) would ease the diabetes and the hypothyroid symptoms.  I guess not, huh?

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I started another thread about diabetes because I find it confusing :unsure:   Not sure if this will help: http://www.celiac.com/gluten-free/topic/106575-type-1-vs-type-2-diabetes-differences-needed-in-simple-terms/

 

 

 

cyclinglady, my fasting level was also 100 in February, but the GI didn't bring it up.  I get all my test results online.  That blood was taken at 6:30am in the morning.  Last February 2013, my level was 90 and that was taken in the afternoon about two hours after eating.  In April 2013, it was 77 and that was taken around 4:30pm while fasting.  I'm waiting to complete some testing for neutral and total fat malabsorption which is most likely problems with my pancreas and lack of enzymes and small bowel.  Did your doctor seemed concerned about your 100 level since it is just in the pre-diabetic range?

 

 

My fasting blood glucose was 100, and my Hemoglobin A1c was 5.8.  Not bad.  Just borderline.   I have a genetic anemia, so that can affect the HA1c results.  I was not content to do a re-check in three months.  And I was not willing to give up sweets since I had already given up gluten!  

 

 

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No, my GP didn't seem concerned.  Instructed me to cut "out sugar" and exercise (I get my results and doctor comments online too).  What?  I teach three exercise classes a week, run 3.5 miles twice a week and bike ride up to 50 miles on the weekends.  I don't think I can exercise more!  

 

I've already given up gluten and there was no way I was going to give up sugar if I didn't need to.  As I explained in my earlier post, my A1c could be "off" because of my thalssemia (genetic anemia).  One fasting blood glucose of 100 was no motivation for me to change my dietary habit of polishing off a 1/2 pan of gluten-free brownies!  

 

I went online and found Blood Sugar 101 by Jenny Ruhl.  She at least explains diabetes and how to test yourself if you do not have insurance.  So, I bought a cheap meter (checked Consumer Reports) and reasonably priced test strips (less than $0.50) and started tracking my blood sugars for a $30 investment.  What caught my eye was that exposure to blood sugars over 140 causes organ damage and diabetic complications.

 

My blood sugar was running high, but not too bad since I was consuming sugars with proteins and fats.  When I tested my sugar after consuming 1 cup of rice only and then tested an hour later, I got a big spike over 140!  In two hours, it lowered to 128 but that was still high.  A meal at spaghetti factory with just pasta and salad spike it to 155 and it stayed up for five hours!  So, obviously, there is something wrong.  I am not processing sugar properly.  A normal non-diabetic person would not see such numbers.

 

I do have a cheap monitor, so it's not completely accurate, but again, it gives me a decent reading for the purposes of tracking spikes.

 

Do some research on your own.  I have decided that I am not going to wait around and wait until I get a firm diabetes diagnosis from my doctor.  My Dad got the "pre-diabetic" diagnosis last year and within six months he had full blown diabetes.  He did not change his diet dramatically and now has some complications. 

 

Like Celiac Disease, there are many variations of diabetes.   I need to get a definitive diagnosis as treatment can vary.  

 

In the meantime, my blood sugar is normal (as normal as a regular diabetic person) eating a very low carb diet.  The proof is in the testing!  Now, I just have to determine what carbs I can add back in without going over 140 and thus avoiding complications and prolonging insulin or oral meds.  

 

Back to your original question…..my doctor, nice guy, has too many patients to deal with.  He's just going to wait and treat me when my fasting blood sugar has reached 126 and by then, my beta cells might be dead and I'll have developed some horrible complications.  Well, he won't be waiting.  I'm asking for more testing and showing my data to him along with a referral to an endo!

 

In any case, low carb is working for me.  My fasting blood sugar is normal (78 - 83), but is over 100 if I consume lots of carbs (like a simple bowl of strawberries after dinner!)

 

P.S.  I also read Dr. Berstein's Diabetes Solution.  He has some good information and he's an M.D. and has lived with Type 1 for over 60 years!  

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thanks for all the info!

 

 

No, my GP didn't seem concerned.  Instructed me to cut "out sugar" and exercise (I get my results and doctor comments online too).  What?  I teach three exercise classes a week, run 3.5 miles twice a week and bike ride up to 50 miles on the weekends.  I don't think I can exercise more!  

 

I've already given up gluten and there was no way I was going to give up sugar if I didn't need to.  As I explained in my earlier post, my A1c could be "off" because of my thalssemia (genetic anemia).  One fasting blood glucose of 100 was no motivation for me to change my dietary habit of polishing off a 1/2 pan of gluten-free brownies!  

 

I went online and found Blood Sugar 101 by Jenny Ruhl.  She at least explains diabetes and how to test yourself if you do not have insurance.  So, I bought a cheap meter (checked Consumer Reports) and reasonably priced test strips (less than $0.50) and started tracking my blood sugars for a $30 investment.  What caught my eye was that exposure to blood sugars over 140 causes organ damage and diabetic complications.

 

My blood sugar was running high, but not too bad since I was consuming sugars with proteins and fats.  When I tested my sugar after consuming 1 cup of rice only and then tested an hour later, I got a big spike over 140!  In two hours, it lowered to 128 but that was still high.  A meal at spaghetti factory with just pasta and salad spike it to 155 and it stayed up for five hours!  So, obviously, there is something wrong.  I am not processing sugar properly.  A normal non-diabetic person would not see such numbers.

 

I do have a cheap monitor, so it's not completely accurate, but again, it gives me a decent reading for the purposes of tracking spikes.

 

Do some research on your own.  I have decided that I am not going to wait around and wait until I get a firm diabetes diagnosis from my doctor.  My Dad got the "pre-diabetic" diagnosis last year and within six months he had full blown diabetes.  He did not change his diet dramatically and now has some complications. 

 

Like Celiac Disease, there are many variations of diabetes.   I need to get a definitive diagnosis as treatment can vary.  

 

In the meantime, my blood sugar is normal (as normal as a regular diabetic person) eating a very low carb diet.  The proof is in the testing!  Now, I just have to determine what carbs I can add back in without going over 140 and thus avoiding complications and prolonging insulin or oral meds.  

 

Back to your original question…..my doctor, nice guy, has too many patients to deal with.  He's just going to wait and treat me when my fasting blood sugar has reached 126 and by then, my beta cells might be dead and I'll have developed some horrible complications.  Well, he won't be waiting.  I'm asking for more testing and showing my data to him along with a referral to an endo!

 

In any case, low carb is working for me.  My fasting blood sugar is normal (78 - 83), but is over 100 if I consume lots of carbs (like a simple bowl of strawberries after dinner!)

 

P.S.  I also read Dr. Berstein's Diabetes Solution.  He has some good information and he's an M.D. and has lived with Type 1 for over 60 years!  

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I am being tested this week, biopsy, for celiac.  24 years ago (I remember cuz my daughter was 2) I was diagnosed with hypothyroidism.  12 years ago (I remember cuz my favorite boss quit), type 2 diabetes.  I won't go into the other "illnesses" or symptoms that I'm reading accompany celiac and/or gluten intolerance, but I had perhaps a stupid notion that eliminating gluten at this stage of the game (regardless of the biopsy/blood tests am going to eliminate gluten) would ease the diabetes and the hypothyroid symptoms.  I guess not, huh?

IDK :huh:

 

all I know is since being gluten and soy free  my hashimotos antibodys are much closer to normal range then they were 3 years ago. I am now off medformin ( Diabetic meds) even thou I am 40 pounds heavier than when diagnosed as a type 2 diabetic  and my most recent ANA was in normal range .

No scientific reports to back it up but I  would not be surprised that in the future they do make a connection .

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I have late onset type 1 diabetes. Twenty-eight years ago, I was experiencing symptoms that I recognized as probable diabetes, at the age of 41. A random (not fasting) sample on this date in 1986 was over 500 mg/dl.

I began taking insulin within 48 hours, and have been ever since. I have had minor retinopathy in one eye, but other than I have had no complications. The kidneys are usually the first organs to exhibit damage, but my kidney function is normal.

 

What caught my eye was that exposure to blood sugars over 140 causes organ damage and diabetic complications.

A normal non-diabetic person would not see such numbers.

I don't know anything about the sources cyclinglady refers to, but that information is not consistent with what I understand to be true.

A sugar level of 128, or even 150, one to two hours after a meal is normal in non-diabetics. If organ damage were to start at 140, then everyone, not just diabetics, would be having it.

Click here for more about blood sugar testing. The chart near the bottom is useful to interpret readings, and it is in both mmol/l (Canadian) and mg/dl (US) units.

The level of 126 md/dl (7.0 mmol/l) referred to is the threshold for fasting blood glucose to be considered diagnostic. Two or more fasting lab tests above that level are generally considered diagnostic of diabetes.

I can share more, but privately. Send a message if you want.

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Thanks, Peter! I will take you up on your offer.

I am definitely not an expert on diabetes and am only in the early stages of research. I realize that Berstein's book does not follow mainstream practices and lacks sited research, but it does contain good tips. Jenny Ruhl's Blood Sugar 101 was very helpful and seemed to be well sited. I have also checked out the American Diabetes Association's website. I have discovered many different types of diabetes and that everyone is different in regards to treatment.

Right now, I am only pre-diabetic, but would like, if possible, to delay or prevent diabetes.

No one on this forum should take my personal observances as a recommendation for their own treatment.

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hmm, I learned in a CEU course years ago, that a blood sugar of 150 or more interferes with the electronics of the heart, not a place I would want to be.

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Type 1 is autoimmune. Not sure about Type 2 and celiac disease. 

Are you sure you have Type 2? It's baffling but there are still a lot of doctors out there who mistakenly diagnose Type 2 simply because you are an adult at the time of diagnosis. 

Hello

Type 2 diabetes and celiac disease are also autoimmune

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Hello

Type 2 diabetes and celiac disease are also autoimmune

As far as I know, type two is not considered to be autoimmune in nature, BUT it can be made worse by the inflammation created by autoimmune diseases like celiac disease.

 

Type 1 diabetes is autoimmune and caused by the destruction of parts of the pancreas.  Type 2 results from insulin resistance and pancreatic burn-out; it is a result of the types of foods you've put in your system - as I understand it.

 

I've also recently been diagnosed as prediabetic (to type 2). I am making changes to my diet, but I have to say that I'm finding it much harder than I found going gluten-free... No grains or sugars of any types is what I am finding I need to keep my blood glucose down. I was already lower carb than the typical person. To get into normal (blood glucpose) numbers I need to eat almost no carbs, which is no fun.

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As far as I know, type two is not considered to be autoimmune in nature, BUT it can be made worse by the inflammation created by autoimmune diseases like celiac disease.

 

Type 1 diabetes is autoimmune and caused by the destruction of parts of the pancreas.  Type 2 results from insulin resistance and pancreatic burn-out; it is a result of the types of foods you've put in your system - as I understand it.

 

I've also recently been diagnosed as prediabetic (to type 2). I am making changes to my diet, but I have to say that I'm finding it much harder than I found going gluten-free... No grains or sugars of any types is what I am finding I need to keep my blood glucose down. I was already lower carb than the typical person. To get into normal (blood glucpose) numbers I need to eat almost no carbs, which is no fun.

I hear what you're saying! I find diabetics harder to deal with than celiac also...especially since there are so many good gluten free baked goods to be had now but all are high carb. That's enough to start a self pity party every so often;-(.

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Pity party is the perfect term for it.  LOL  ;)  I remember commenting to my mother when I was first diagnosed that at least it wasn't diabetes because I'd have a hard time giving up sweets - and now it's both.  :rolleyes:

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Ha! Served my family their first helping of "fake mashed potatoes" made from mashed califlower, butter and cream. They were not thrilled, but they said it was better than the asparagus! Sticking to a low carb diet and it is helping with my blood sugar levels.

This is much harder than giving up gluten.

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Hello

Type 2 diabetes and celiac disease are also autoimmune

 

Type 2 is not autoimmune.

 

http://diabetes.niddk.nih.gov/dm/pubs/type1and2/

 

In rereading my earlier post, I see that my response was pretty unclear. What I was trying to say is that I am not sure if there is any connection between celiac disease (autoimmune) and Type 2 (not autoimmune). Sorry for the confusing post earlier  :)

 

Dealing with both diets together is...well....challenging.  

 

Btw cyclinglady, my family LOVES cheesy cauliflower "fake" mashed potatoes!  

Edited by SkyBlue4
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Dealing with both diets together is...well....challenging.  

 

Btw cyclinglady, my family LOVES cheesy cauliflower "fake" mashed potatoes!  

 

 

 

Loaded Cauliflower Casserole :wub: :wub:

Just like mac and cheese without the pasta

... 2 lbs cauliflower florets

8 oz shredded sharp cheddar cheese, divided

8 oz shredded Monterrey Jack cheese, divided

8 oz block cream cheese, softened

4 tablespoons heavy cream

2 bunches green onions, sliced (1 1/2 cups)

6 sliced bacon, cooked and crumbled

1 clove garlic, grated

Salt & pepper to taste

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

Steam cauliflower florets until tender.

While cauliflower steams, cream together 6 oz of the shredded cheddar, 6 oz of the Monterrey Jack, cream cheese, and heavy cream.

Stir in sliced green onions, chopped bacon, and garlic.

Set aside.

Drain any liquid from steamed cauliflower and add to cheese mixture.

Stir cauliflower and cheese mixture together.

Taste for seasoning, and add as necessary.

If you want a finer texture, give a few mashes with the potato masher.

Pour into a 2-3 quart casserole and sprinkle on remaining cheddar and Monterrey Jack cheese.

Cover dish with foil and bake for 25 minutes; remove foil and continue to bake until cheese is brown and bubbly. :D :D

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Type 1 diabetes is autoimmune; type 2 is not. I wrote about them in another topic here a week ago.

There is a correlation between type 1 diabetes and celiac disease. Type 1 diabetes occurs more frequently among persons with celiac disease than among the general population. The reverse is also true: celiac disease occurs more frequently in type 1 diabetics than in the general population. This does not prove, however, that one causes the other.

No correlation exists that I am aware of between type 2 diabetes and celiac disease.

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Loaded Cauliflower Casserole :wub: :wub:

Just like mac and cheese without the pasta

... 2 lbs cauliflower florets

8 oz shredded sharp cheddar cheese, divided

8 oz shredded Monterrey Jack cheese, divided

8 oz block cream cheese, softened

4 tablespoons heavy cream

2 bunches green onions, sliced (1 1/2 cups)

6 sliced bacon, cooked and crumbled

1 clove garlic, grated

Salt & pepper to taste

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

Steam cauliflower florets until tender.

While cauliflower steams, cream together 6 oz of the shredded cheddar, 6 oz of the Monterrey Jack, cream cheese, and heavy cream.

Stir in sliced green onions, chopped bacon, and garlic.

Set aside.

Drain any liquid from steamed cauliflower and add to cheese mixture.

Stir cauliflower and cheese mixture together.

Taste for seasoning, and add as necessary.

If you want a finer texture, give a few mashes with the potato masher.

Pour into a 2-3 quart casserole and sprinkle on remaining cheddar and Monterrey Jack cheese.

Cover dish with foil and bake for 25 minutes; remove foil and continue to bake until cheese is brown and bubbly. :D :D

 

Mmmmm. My family might eat cauliflower this way...Thanks!

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    • Larry Gessner  »  cyclinglady

      Hi There, I don't know if there is a place for videos in the forum. I just watched "The Truth About Gluten" I think it is a good video. I would like to share it somewhere but don't know where it should go. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
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      https://youtu.be/IU6jVEwpjnE Thank You,
      Larry
      · 2 replies
    • ChiaChick  »  Peaceflower

      Hi Peaceflower, Just wanted to say thank you for the chat.
      · 0 replies
    • ukuleleerika

      Hello! I am new to this Celiac website... Is there anyone out there with Celiac AND extensive food allergies? My allergies include shellfish, dairy, eggs, cantaloupe, kiwi, mango, nuts, oranges, red dye, and more I can't think of. I went to the allergist about a year ago to see why I wasn't feeling well, and once everything was eliminated, I still didn't feel well. We did more testing to find out I had celiac as well as allergies to cattle as well as rye grass (I live on a farm basically). This was back in January 2016. I recently had my endoscopy with the gastroenterologist a week ago. I have no idea what to do or what to eat... So fish and potatoes for me!
      · 2 replies
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