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Scared To Death

anxiety food intolerance

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#16 pghkid33

 
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Posted 12 March 2014 - 05:09 PM

a "mediator release test" is not going to diagnose anything, hon, Sorry.

 

There are NO valid tests for food intolerances.

 

http://www.quackwatc...lergytests.html

 

And from the the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (AAAAI) Practice Paper, Current approach to the diagnosis and management of adverse reactions to foods [PDF]:

http://www.scienceba...he-science-say/

 

From the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology [4.2.2.9. Nonstandardized and Unproven Procedures; Guideline 12:

 

The (Expert Panel) recommends not using any of the following nonstandardized tests for the routine evaluation of IgE-mediated (food allergy):

  • Basophil histamine release/activation
  • Lymphocyte stimulation
  • Facial thermography
  • Gastric juice analysis
  • Endoscopic allergen provocation
  • Hair analysis
  • Applied kinesiology
  • Provocation neutralization
  • Allergen-specific IgG4
  • Cytotoxicity assays
  • Electrodermal test (Vega)
  • Mediator release assay (LEAP diet)

 

Read the science, hon and stop wasting your money on unproven tests. IMHO

Thank you for this. I did the electrodermal test a few weeks ago, and I remember feeling pretty ripped-off / duped. I regret paying for the damn mediator release test now too. All of it seems to be a scam, with false science, sadly. I felt desperate at the time and just wanted an answer, but it's clear that it wasn't the answer. I guess I just don't know who to see or where to go at this point. I have a physician's appt. in three weeks, and I'm going to see this chiropractor again next week. I guess I should see a neurologist, but I really think the problem lies in my gut. (at the same time, my current neuro symptoms are so very distressful). I feel like I have to come up with all of the answers myself, and I can't afford to keep setting aside months to try different diets hoping they will work, as I am not even healthy enough to work right now. Damnit why is this so hard??


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#17 itsmebiancap

 
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Posted 13 March 2014 - 07:37 AM

I actually think the opposite of most of the post. Sometimes in order to diagnose yourself you must do an elimination diet. But to eliminate everything from your body consistently is not always helpful. The way the body works is that it needs a certain percentage of everything. However, some bodies think those "things" are attacking it even though it isn't and fights back. Thats where intolerances and allergies come from. However, by eliminating all of these ingredients without knowing for sure can possibly weaken your immune system and hurt your body more so.  Then when your body gets some of that stuff it may automatically fight it because its not used to it and cannot overcome.

 

Instead of removing all of the foods you eat, why don't you take an allergy test. There is a problem however, if you haven't eaten it for about 6-8 weeks it may come back as negative on the results. But if you haven't been 100% faithful than it may show up. Those testings are usually very expensive but alot of hospitals/clinics offer a sliding fee scale where they base it off of income or other measurements to where you pay a lower percentage of the testing/visit then normal.

 

The other thing is that being one with Celiac disease means your guts lining is messed up. So even though you eat normal or large portions it comes out until it is repaired (this may take a while depending on your body). But it doesn't necessarily mean you have another food intolerance. Whenever you remove something from your diet, your body panics and it tries to replace it with something else. However that something else is something different then what your body wants so it just disposes of it. This happened to me too.

 

MY body wanted gluten however I removed it so I was just eating massive portions of food and it was just coming out every day. I was losing weight excessively no matter how good/bad I ate.  Maybe after a month or so it stabilized. The way your body and mind works is a little tricky. See your body thinks as soon as something is removed that it is "in danger" and goes into survival mode. Your mind thinks "I don't need this but I want it" and then it combats each other. Thats why diets are hard to do because emotions are battling truth and anxiety kicks in to where you just give up. However, after 3-4 weeks your mind and body unite and realize I can do this. I don't need it. See I am okay and then its "normal" or a habit to do whatever you were trying to do before then. However during the beginning stages you feel anxious like "I have to fix this" or "maybe something else is wrong" and we start eliminating or resolving but really we should just be waiting. 

 

I would say to try to slowly add things back into your diet maybe one spoon at first, then a few spoons, then a half portion, full portion and see if it really is something you are allergic. If it is eliminate, if not include it here and there. As the years pass, all these eliminations will be hard to reintroduce and to live by because it is so limiting that it may cause stress and anxiety unnecessarily.

 

Switching doctors may never end because in my experience doctors don't know to much about gluten intolerance/celiac unless they have first hand witnessed it they treat it very lightly and don't understand the side effects it can cause or autoimmune diseases it can trigger. If they did none of us would be using celiac.com because we would have all the answers. But the truth is this is a whole new industry that is now gaining popularity and hitting mainstream so until then we are kind of all just in suspense to see if the latest news will help us individually. 

 

I hope this helps and wasn't rude or repetitive. I am just thinking about past experience, studies and research I done to see if it is beneficial for you. Best of luck! I go to the dr today to see if they can help me. If I am diagnosed with something I will let you know since some of your symptoms I been experiencing lately.

 

 


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#18 pghkid33

 
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Posted 13 March 2014 - 10:30 AM

I actually think the opposite of most of the post. Sometimes in order to diagnose yourself you must do an elimination diet. But to eliminate everything from your body consistently is not always helpful. The way the body works is that it needs a certain percentage of everything. However, some bodies think those "things" are attacking it even though it isn't and fights back. Thats where intolerances and allergies come from. However, by eliminating all of these ingredients without knowing for sure can possibly weaken your immune system and hurt your body more so.  Then when your body gets some of that stuff it may automatically fight it because its not used to it and cannot overcome.

 

Instead of removing all of the foods you eat, why don't you take an allergy test. There is a problem however, if you haven't eaten it for about 6-8 weeks it may come back as negative on the results. But if you haven't been 100% faithful than it may show up. Those testings are usually very expensive but alot of hospitals/clinics offer a sliding fee scale where they base it off of income or other measurements to where you pay a lower percentage of the testing/visit then normal.

 

The other thing is that being one with Celiac disease means your guts lining is messed up. So even though you eat normal or large portions it comes out until it is repaired (this may take a while depending on your body). But it doesn't necessarily mean you have another food intolerance. Whenever you remove something from your diet, your body panics and it tries to replace it with something else. However that something else is something different then what your body wants so it just disposes of it. This happened to me too.

 

MY body wanted gluten however I removed it so I was just eating massive portions of food and it was just coming out every day. I was losing weight excessively no matter how good/bad I ate.  Maybe after a month or so it stabilized. The way your body and mind works is a little tricky. See your body thinks as soon as something is removed that it is "in danger" and goes into survival mode. Your mind thinks "I don't need this but I want it" and then it combats each other. Thats why diets are hard to do because emotions are battling truth and anxiety kicks in to where you just give up. However, after 3-4 weeks your mind and body unite and realize I can do this. I don't need it. See I am okay and then its "normal" or a habit to do whatever you were trying to do before then. However during the beginning stages you feel anxious like "I have to fix this" or "maybe something else is wrong" and we start eliminating or resolving but really we should just be waiting. 

 

I would say to try to slowly add things back into your diet maybe one spoon at first, then a few spoons, then a half portion, full portion and see if it really is something you are allergic. If it is eliminate, if not include it here and there. As the years pass, all these eliminations will be hard to reintroduce and to live by because it is so limiting that it may cause stress and anxiety unnecessarily.

 

Switching doctors may never end because in my experience doctors don't know to much about gluten intolerance/celiac unless they have first hand witnessed it they treat it very lightly and don't understand the side effects it can cause or autoimmune diseases it can trigger. If they did none of us would be using celiac.com because we would have all the answers. But the truth is this is a whole new industry that is now gaining popularity and hitting mainstream so until then we are kind of all just in suspense to see if the latest news will help us individually. 

 

I hope this helps and wasn't rude or repetitive. I am just thinking about past experience, studies and research I done to see if it is beneficial for you. Best of luck! I go to the dr today to see if they can help me. If I am diagnosed with something I will let you know since some of your symptoms I been experiencing lately.

 

Thx man, I'm going to see what this doc says just b/c he was recommended to me by a couple of people who have celiac disease. But overall, you're right, they don't know jack, and it's pretty damn frustrating to be told again and again that you are a headcase. Makes one feel like an idiot, so in some ways you become worse off than you were going in to the doc. It's great that we have this online community, but I guess I get confused sometimes because everyone seems to say do this, or that, and I can't decide what I should be doing with my diet. Even if I do decide, you have to be on that diet for quite some time for it to really work right? Which sucks for me right now, because I'm not even well enough to work or anything ahhhh. I just want to move on with my life! I think i'm going to continue grain-free for a while... I was grain free for about a month or so before, although with dairy. I improved a little bit, but then stopped doing so, so I gave up. I can definitely tell that I'm less foggy and itchy without the grains, so that's something right? I'm not going to add grains or dairy back in for quite some time. Definitely let me know what ends up happening with your doc! Appreciate the input.


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#19 IrishHeart

 
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Posted 13 March 2014 - 06:42 PM

I actually think the opposite of most of the post. Sometimes in order to diagnose yourself you must do an elimination diet. But to eliminate everything from your body consistently is not always helpful. The way the body works is that it needs a certain percentage of everything. However, some bodies think those "things" are attacking it even though it isn't and fights back. Thats where intolerances and allergies come from. However, by eliminating all of these ingredients without knowing for sure can possibly weaken your immune system and hurt your body more so.  Then when your body gets some of that stuff it may automatically fight it because its not used to it and cannot overcome.

 

Instead of removing all of the foods you eat, why don't you take an allergy test. There is a problem however, if you haven't eaten it for about 6-8 weeks it may come back as negative on the results. But if you haven't been 100% faithful than it may show up. Those testings are usually very expensive but alot of hospitals/clinics offer a sliding fee scale where they base it off of income or other measurements to where you pay a lower percentage of the testing/visit then normal.

 

The other thing is that being one with Celiac disease means your guts lining is messed up. So even though you eat normal or large portions it comes out until it is repaired (this may take a while depending on your body). But it doesn't necessarily mean you have another food intolerance. Whenever you remove something from your diet, your body panics and it tries to replace it with something else. However that something else is something different then what your body wants so it just disposes of it. This happened to me too.

 

MY body wanted gluten however I removed it so I was just eating massive portions of food and it was just coming out every day. I was losing weight excessively no matter how good/bad I ate.  Maybe after a month or so it stabilized. The way your body and mind works is a little tricky. See your body thinks as soon as something is removed that it is "in danger" and goes into survival mode. Your mind thinks "I don't need this but I want it" and then it combats each other. Thats why diets are hard to do because emotions are battling truth and anxiety kicks in to where you just give up. However, after 3-4 weeks your mind and body unite and realize I can do this. I don't need it. See I am okay and then its "normal" or a habit to do whatever you were trying to do before then. However during the beginning stages you feel anxious like "I have to fix this" or "maybe something else is wrong" and we start eliminating or resolving but really we should just be waiting. 

 

I would say to try to slowly add things back into your diet maybe one spoon at first, then a few spoons, then a half portion, full portion and see if it really is something you are allergic. If it is eliminate, if not include it here and there. As the years pass, all these eliminations will be hard to reintroduce and to live by because it is so limiting that it may cause stress and anxiety unnecessarily.

 

Switching doctors may never end because in my experience doctors don't know to much about gluten intolerance/celiac unless they have first hand witnessed it they treat it very lightly and don't understand the side effects it can cause or autoimmune diseases it can trigger. If they did none of us would be using celiac.com because we would have all the answers. But the truth is this is a whole new industry that is now gaining popularity and hitting mainstream so until then we are kind of all just in suspense to see if the latest news will help us individually. 

 

I hope this helps and wasn't rude or repetitive. I am just thinking about past experience, studies and research I done to see if it is beneficial for you. Best of luck! I go to the dr today to see if they can help me. If I am diagnosed with something I will let you know since some of your symptoms I been experiencing lately.

 

 

Honestly...I have read your post repeatedly and I am not really sure what your point is. Sorry.

 

Just one example that is very confusing:

 

Whenever you remove something from your diet, your body panics and it tries to replace it with something else. However that something else is something different then what your body wants so it just disposes of it. This happened to me too.


Edited by IrishHeart, 14 March 2014 - 04:28 AM.

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#20 kareng

 
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Posted 13 March 2014 - 07:07 PM

I actually think the opposite of most of the post. Sometimes in order to diagnose yourself you must do an elimination diet. But to eliminate everything from your body consistently is not always helpful. The way the body works is that it needs a certain percentage of everything. However, some bodies think those "things" are attacking it even though it isn't and fights back. Thats where intolerances and allergies come from. However, by eliminating all of these ingredients without knowing for sure can possibly weaken your immune system and hurt your body more so.  Then when your body gets some of that stuff it may automatically fight it because its not used to it and cannot overcome.
 
Instead of removing all of the foods you eat, why don't you take an allergy test. There is a problem however, if you haven't eaten it for about 6-8 weeks it may come back as negative on the results. But if you haven't been 100% faithful than it may show up. Those testings are usually very expensive but alot of hospitals/clinics offer a sliding fee scale where they base it off of income or other measurements to where you pay a lower percentage of the testing/visit then normal.
 
The other thing is that being one with Celiac disease means your guts lining is messed up. So even though you eat normal or large portions it comes out until it is repaired (this may take a while depending on your body). But it doesn't necessarily mean you have another food intolerance. Whenever you remove something from your diet, your body panics and it tries to replace it with something else. However that something else is something different then what your body wants so it just disposes of it. This happened to me too.
 
MY body wanted gluten however I removed it so I was just eating massive portions of food and it was just coming out every day. I was losing weight excessively no matter how good/bad I ate.  Maybe after a month or so it stabilized. The way your body and mind works is a little tricky. See your body thinks as soon as something is removed that it is "in danger" and goes into survival mode. Your mind thinks "I don't need this but I want it" and then it combats each other. Thats why diets are hard to do because emotions are battling truth and anxiety kicks in to where you just give up. However, after 3-4 weeks your mind and body unite and realize I can do this. I don't need it. See I am okay and then its "normal" or a habit to do whatever you were trying to do before then. However during the beginning stages you feel anxious like "I have to fix this" or "maybe something else is wrong" and we start eliminating or resolving but really we should just be waiting. 
 
I would say to try to slowly add things back into your diet maybe one spoon at first, then a few spoons, then a half portion, full portion and see if it really is something you are allergic. If it is eliminate, if not include it here and there. As the years pass, all these eliminations will be hard to reintroduce and to live by because it is so limiting that it may cause stress and anxiety unnecessarily.
 
Switching doctors may never end because in my experience doctors don't know to much about gluten intolerance/celiac unless they have first hand witnessed it they treat it very lightly and don't understand the side effects it can cause or autoimmune diseases it can trigger. If they did none of us would be using celiac.com because we would have all the answers. But the truth is this is a whole new industry that is now gaining popularity and hitting mainstream so until then we are kind of all just in suspense to see if the latest news will help us individually. 
 
I hope this helps and wasn't rude or repetitive. I am just thinking about past experience, studies and research I done to see if it is beneficial for you. Best of luck! I go to the dr today to see if they can help me. If I am diagnosed with something I will let you know since some of your symptoms I been experiencing lately.


I think this is a bit confusing, too. I am going to address this part that I think I understand what you are claiming:


"Whenever you remove something from your diet, your body panics and it tries to replace it with something else. However that something else is something different then what your body wants so it just disposes of it. This happened to me too."


I only eat watermelon in the summer when it it good. You seem to be saying that when I stop eating watermelon, my body tries to replace watermelon with something else? And it doesn't like the new fruit so it " disposes" of it? How does that make sense? That is the normal way for humans to eat.
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#21 pghkid33

 
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Posted 14 March 2014 - 08:44 AM

I think this is a bit confusing, too. I am going to address this part that I think I understand what you are claiming:


"Whenever you remove something from your diet, your body panics and it tries to replace it with something else. However that something else is something different then what your body wants so it just disposes of it. This happened to me too."


I only eat watermelon in the summer when it it good. You seem to be saying that when I stop eating watermelon, my body tries to replace watermelon with something else? And it doesn't like the new fruit so it " disposes" of it? How does that make sense? That is the normal way for humans to eat.

Yeah, I didn't quite understand what he was going for there either. I only agree with it in that my body seems to want to dispose of everything!


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#22 w8in4dave

 
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Posted 14 March 2014 - 06:24 PM

my body seems to want to dispose of everything also! LOL ... Yea i'm on the same page as most everyone eles. It makes no sense ... Believe me I have been doing the elimination diet :)  helps with the disposing of everything  :) If ya know what I mean! :) 


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