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Still Not Taken Seriously?


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24 replies to this topic

#16 bartfull

 
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Posted 08 April 2014 - 01:48 PM

As a waitress and fellow celiac, I'm kind of scared by everyone saying they get salads when they go out. Salads are some of the most likely things to be contaminated! In every restaurant I've worked the station that the salads are made is the same place they make wraps, appetizers, and possibly sandwiches. And when they're busy their hands that have touched flour tortillas and fried food go right in the lettuce and other veggies. It depends on the restaurant, of course, but I see enough that I'd never eat a salad at any place I've worked.

I have mentioned the same thing a few times. I worked in restaurants for years and I never saw a salad station I would trust.


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gluten-free since June, 2011

Can't eat soy, corn, or foods high in salicylates.

Nightshades now seem to bother me too.

 

BUT I CAN STILL PLAY MY GUITAR AND THAT"S ALL THAT MATTERS!

 


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#17 HavaneseMom

 
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Posted 09 April 2014 - 07:34 PM

As a waitress and fellow celiac, I'm kind of scared by everyone saying they get salads when they go out. Salads are some of the most likely things to be contaminated! In every restaurant I've worked the station that the salads are made is the same place they make wraps, appetizers, and possibly sandwiches. And when they're busy their hands that have touched flour tortillas and fried food go right in the lettuce and other veggies. It depends on the restaurant, of course, but I see enough that I'd never eat a salad at any place I've worked.

  

I have mentioned the same thing a few times. I worked in restaurants for years and I never saw a salad station I would trust.


Oh my! Thank you both for that info, I had no idea.
I am wondering -Since you both have worked in restaurants and have an idea of what goes on behind the scenes, what would you suggest that people order when eating out?
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Grateful to be correctly diagnosed at 40.
Likely misdiagnosed since childhood.
Blood test and Biopsies positive for Celiac Disease.
Gluten Free Since 10/9/13.

Be kind whenever possible. It is always possible. ~ Dalai Lama

#18 Gemini

 
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Posted 10 April 2014 - 10:43 AM

I think instead of wondering what you should order, more attention should be paid to the type of restaurant you eat out in.  I have never been glutened by a salad in 9 years gluten-free but I eat at restaurants that are much higher end places, where the chef has been to culinary school and had an education in cc and everything that goes along with it.  I do not eat out that often at all because the higher end places cost more money so eating out is a real treat.  If the employees are line cooks only, then they have experience but usually are not graduates of a culinary school.  If that is the case, then no matter what you order will have a higher chance of being cc'd.

 

The other criteria I follow with success are restaurants that have Celiac in the family so they are more aware of the dangers of cc. I know some parts of the country are not as Celiac aware and that can be part of the problem too.  I never eat fast food and there is only one chain I trust that has been GIG trained.  The others either have crappy food or I don't trust them to get it right.  There are websites that list and review (from fellow Celiac's) menu's so you can always look at those and see what other people are saying.


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#19 JNBunnie1

 
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Posted 11 April 2014 - 08:27 PM

I worked in a hotel that had a restaurant and a major catering operation for the

meeting space in the hotel. I worked with a whole lot of culinary school graduates

who wouldn't know the word 'gluten' if it were the million dollar question on a game

show. Just sayin'. :rolleyes:  Frustrating that we need such long list of 'parameters' for

where we can eat out, I know.


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If you're going through hell, keep going. ~Winston Churchill

#20 Tryingcake101

 
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Posted 11 April 2014 - 08:29 PM

I usually do better in high end restaurants - but not always. I ate at a very high end local restaurant and got extremely ill from cross contamination.    I was sick for about 16 hours.  It was horrible.  But generally speaking, high end restaurants are much safer than cheaper restaurants.  

 

But  a nearby moderately priced pizza joint that offers gluten free pizza always does well.  The owner has twin boys with celiacs.  So they are very couple there.


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#21 Gemini

 
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Posted 12 April 2014 - 09:33 AM

I worked in a hotel that had a restaurant and a major catering operation for the
meeting space in the hotel. I worked with a whole lot of culinary school graduates
who wouldn't know the word 'gluten' if it were the million dollar question on a game
show. Just sayin'. :rolleyes:  Frustrating that we need such long list of 'parameters' for
where we can eat out, I know.


They must not have been paying attention while in class. Around here, we have graduates from the CIA and Johnson & Wales school in Rhode Island and they both have courses in gluten-free cooking. I believe that Johnson & Wales actually has a course of study for Celiac's so they can do the pastry/bread portion without being cc'd. They are taking Celiac Disease very seriously at these places and it shows when they graduate and get jobs. I have spoken at length with graduates from these 2 schools and they are very impressive with their knowledge.
I have also visited the CIA campus in NY and eaten at their restaurants there......great experience. Makes for a good vacation destination because it's a pretty area, rich in history.
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#22 CaliSparrow

 
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Posted 12 April 2014 - 11:46 AM

Wow. He sounds like a bully and obviously ignorant of the situation. I've been glutened in a lot of restaurants and prepare my food at home. I keep hoping that, through time, I won't be so sensitive but that doesn't sound like the case for some of the veterans. Some people seem to be able to cut down the odds of restaurant glutenings after much experience. Wondering if there's a restaurant inquiry checklist on here that we can use when calling ahead.
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#23 JNBunnie1

 
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Posted 12 April 2014 - 02:22 PM

They must not have been paying attention while in class. Around here, we have graduates from the CIA and Johnson & Wales school in Rhode Island and they both have courses in gluten-free cooking. I believe that Johnson & Wales actually has a course of study for Celiac's so they can do the pastry/bread portion without being cc'd. They are taking Celiac Disease very seriously at these places and it shows when they graduate and get jobs. I have spoken at length with graduates from these 2 schools and they are very impressive with their knowledge.
I have also visited the CIA campus in NY and eaten at their restaurants there......great experience. Makes for a good vacation destination because it's a pretty area, rich in history.

That's good to hear! The Johnson and Wales graduates I worked with were, frankly, terrifying. That was ten years ago at this point, and I was working with people who were a long time out of school, so the changes in recent years are very promising.


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If you're going through hell, keep going. ~Winston Churchill

#24 jrohr

 
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Posted 21 April 2014 - 02:25 AM

Just because a restaurant has no gluten free menu, does not mean they cannot accommodate you. Many can and will do just that.  I don't know where you all live but my experience has been the total opposite, especially with high end restaurants.....and they manage to get it right all of the time.  The only places I have had less than stellar experiences with are those with a chef who has no formal culinary training and waitstaff who have no nutrition or food knowledge.  They are used to serving people who will eat anything, without giving a thought to ingredients....which is a large percentage of the population.  I am not excusing the behavior outlined here but restaurants are not obligated to offer us anything so I am usually very appreciative when they do and get it right.

 

This is also a reminder that the more you eat out, the bigger the chance you will sustain repeated gluten hits.  Whether you like it or not, Celiac's have to limit their eating out experiences or suffer the consequences. Even on vacation, I limit my restaurant visits more than most people do and save it for the places I know will do it right. I don't ever go to chains or fast food places, either. You just cannot blame people for their lack of food knowledge....apparently, this is not taught in school anymore.  Just like the people who cannot make change at the register, they know a whole lot of nothing.  :(

I agree with this! We have found some reliable restaurants near home, some with gluten free menus and some without (but thoughtful and careful, know what gluten is). Away from home, its a complete unknown. Getting to the point of knowing the trusted places near home took a lot of glutenings (at places we won't eat at anymore) to find the good ones. It took time. Out and about, reviews can help some, but I am not usually in a position that being glutened would work out so well (does it ever?) in the travel so now try to avoid it as I can. In the end, near home or away, restaurant visits are now much more limited, always more risky than homemade. 


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#25 mbrookes

 
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Posted 23 April 2014 - 02:23 PM

Gemini, I agree with you. I have had great experiences eating out in little ol' backwater Jackson, MS. The more upscale the restaurant, in general, the more cooperative and understanding they are.

 

Another plan:Pick a restaurant you like and talk to the owner/manager/chef or whoever is in charge. Go when they are not busy and explain your situation. Tell him/her that you would like to be a regular customer if they can work with you. This works especially well at "Mom and Pop" type places. That way you will have a safe place to suggest with a group. Added bonus: Don't be surprised if they take you under a wing and treat you like royalty. 


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