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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Nut Intolerance Question
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12 posts in this topic

On my IgG food test, I reacted to almonds, walnuts and pecans. I got a +1 on those and I'm supposed to be cutting them out for a while so my gut can heal before attempting to reintroduce them. I took the test pretty literally and I have been eating pistachios and hazelnuts. I don't think pistachios and hazelnuts were included in the test so I'm starting to wonder if I shouldn't be eating them either. I'm guessing they are in the same family so I may have a problem with them as well. Any thoughts?

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IgG testing isn't accurat or suggested by board certified allergists.  If you have eaten them in the past without issue, you aren't allergic to them.

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I was tested for food intolerances (not allergies) and eating ONLY the foods that were okay, brought down my inflammation overnight. One caveat, the tests showed my body had no reactivity towards soy but they say if you have experienced sensitivity to something in the past, don't eat it. I tested it out and still reacted to it. So, I'd say, stick to the foods that checked out okay and see if it helps.

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It does help when I take out the foods I reacted to but I was unsure about other nuts that weren't on the test either way it since I reacted to all the nuts that were tested if I should stay away from some that weren't on the test. I reacted to almonds, walnuts and pecans but pistachios and hazelnuts were not on the test. It's hard to stick to only the foods that were tested and not reacted to because the test size wasn't huge and I had so many that I did react to, I wanted to add a little more variation in my diet.

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If you are allergic to tree nuts, then exclude all of the from your diet. Eat peanuts since they are a legume.

Stephanie is right about allergies. The test you took is not accurate but it might make it easier to discover intolerances. At least it was a place to start. Keep a food journal. If you really get a reaction beyond the gut (skin, breathing) then do not eat those things and do not buy foods that are made in a shared facility. Just like celiac disease, you have to read the labels!

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Ask your doctor when it is a good time to add other foods and the length of time you need to give each trial so there's no overlap. Sometimes the testing company can advise you as well.

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Thanks for all the advice. I'll cut out all the tree nuts. So sad. I also reacted to peanuts so I am avoiding them as well. I'm hoping to be able to reintroduce most of the foods after abstaining from them for a while. I also stopped eating gluten at the same time. I'm hoping that as mug it heals, I can add back in many of these foods.

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Also, I am aware of the difference between allergy and intolerance. I know I don't have an allergic reaction to them but since I am trying to heal my gut, I am avoiding foods that I reacted to.

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Also, I am aware of the difference between allergy and intolerance. I know I don't have an allergic reaction to them but since I am trying to heal my gut, I am avoiding foods that I reacted to.

What I am saying is that there isn't any peer reviewed studies that show IgG testing as being useful.  Often food logs are much better at pinpointing an issue.  

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What I am saying is that there isn't any peer reviewed studies that show IgG testing as being useful. Often food logs are much better at pinpointing an issue.

As far as food journals go, how are they typically done? I have cut out the foods that I reacted to but it significantly reduced the variety I can have. Would you suggest to start eating the foods again and closely monitor how I feel or reintroduce them more slowly? I appreciate your thoughts.
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Depending on the person and how quickly you are trying to figure stuff out the general rule is to start a new food and eat it for at least 3 days before introducing another one.  This *should* be enough time to help pinpoint issue. If you have noticed it takes longer you can wait 5 or 7 days. A lot depends on what kinds of reactions you were seeing.  

 

When I was doing a log I would keep track of things down to the single ingredient level!  What time I ate it, how much and then track things like sleep, BM patterns and the like. This was actually when I was nursing my child so a bit different but the general idea is the same.  Hope that helps some.

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Thank you! I think I will try this. There are some foods that I would really like to reincorporate.

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