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      READ FIRST: Super Sensitive Celiacs Disclaimer   09/23/2015

      This section of the forum is devoted to those who have responses to gluten beyond the experience of the majority of celiacs. It should not be construed as representative of the symptoms you are likely to encounter or precautions you need to take. Only those with extreme reactions need go to the lengths discussed here. Many people with newly diagnosed celiac disease have a condition known as leaky gut syndrome, which can lead to the development of sensitivity to other foods until the gut is healed - which may take as long as one to three years. At that time they are often able to reincorporate into their diet foods to which they have formerly been sensitive. Leaky gut syndrome leads many people to believe they are being exposed to gluten when they are in fact reacting to other foods.
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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Safe Wines For Super- Sensitive People?
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41 posts in this topic

Hi everyone,

 

I know the wine topic has been done before, and I may have missed it, but I can't find it in the super sensitive forum...

 

I have reacted to wines without question. I have reacted really badly to distilled grain alcohol as well.

 

Just wondering, what wines have you drank (if you are super-sensitive) without problems? I have had all Yellowtail wines without problems but I've tried a few others that "said" they were gluten free but sometimes I have a typical gluten reaction. 

 

Just wondering because I'd love to expand my repertoire without the pain of trial and error!

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How long have you been gluten free? Lots of gluten-free folks have to wait many months to a year before drinking.

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How long have you been gluten free? Lots of gluten-free folks have to wait many months to a year before drinking.

In the three months after going gluten-free I reacted to whisky in a way I hadn't before - horrible horrible cramps, bloating and gas. Six months down the line and all is good again :) If you are new to the diet it is fiddly working out what you can tolerate/re-introduce but preferable to cutting it all out. Apologies if you're further into it than that and this is irrelevant!

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While  healing  one  should  avoid  many things...you need  to  eat  very clean  & pure  for  about  at  least  6 months  or  a year.....your  body is  struggling  to heal , it needs  all the help it  can get  from you.... I  agree  with cyclinglady.....

many times  it isn't  the  wine   per  say but the  sulfates  added in  the  wine..... Frey Vineyards  has sulfate  free  wine.....I'm sure there  are others  but  that is a good  one...

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I agree that trial and error is a hard way to try to find out if you can drink something.  Super sensitivity is a pain.  I guess that's why I don't have a wine that I can drink.  I am currently drinking an apple vodka.  Not right now though, it's 10 a.m. LOL

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I agree that trial and error is a hard way to try to find out if you can drink something.  Super sensitivity is a pain.  I guess that's why I don't have a wine that I can drink.  I am currently drinking an apple vodka.  Not right now though, it's 10 a.m. LOL

lolz!

 

i have found that my tolerance for alcohol has diminished aka i am a cheap date since i'm gluten free.  i can drink beer, and.......  that's it.  zero to s#!tfaced if i drink wine.  i dare not try anything stronger because i don't have that much bail $$$ lolz

 

if you are new to the diet, i agree with the others.  give your body a chance to heal a little first, then trial and error :)

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Wines are inherently gluten free and I have never seen one labeled as such because you don't have to label a naturally gluten free product.  Most people, if they react, are not healed yet or are reacting to something else, like sulfites.  I drink red wine often and am very sensitive......never had a problem.  I have no issue with sulfites, either. I could not drink any alcohol at all, pre-diagnosis or until I had healed.  I was a late starter to red wine.  :)

 

I am sure some poeple think there is gluten in some wines but any reputable celiac organization says no, they are safe.  Booze is tricky....people can have weird reactions to any of it for differing reasons but no need to worry about gluten.

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.  Booze is tricky....people can have weird reactions to any of it for differing reasons but no need to worry about gluten.

 

If there were gluten in wine or distilled alcohol, I'd be dead by now.  :D

 

I echo everyone else's advice. Wait a bit longer before indulging. Your gut may still be raw. I had to wait a long time before I could enjoy it again after diagnosis. (and for the 3 years before it, I was too sick to indulge.) I'm sort of making up for lost time. Just had a fabulous sangiovese blend last night....

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I love Sangiovese....but then again, I have never met a red wine I did not like!  :) 

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I love Sangiovese....but then again, I have never met a red wine I did not like!  :)

ditto

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My celiac specialist dietician told me that most (not every single one just most) wines were naturally gluten free and really shouldn't be coming into contact with gluten UNLESS it's flavored. Any flavored wine or liquor should be avoided unless certified gluten free as it very well could contain gluten cross contamination. I think I am super sensitive I'm not 100% sure but other people with celiac disease that I have met have told me I am more sensitive than them and I do react to some "gluten-free" foods that contain 20ppm or less. Anything not made in a gluten free dedicated facility can result in a reaction for me but I usually drink wines from less prominent wineries not mass market wines so I would assume these places are just making wine and nothing else since they seem to be Napa wineries or European wineries.

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You never mentioned flavorings.  Always check the label if flavor is added to wine/grain alcohol.  The straight product is gluten free.

 

Colleen

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I haven't had any bad reactions to wine.

 

Unless of course I forget when to quit!  :P 

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A note about the flavored wines - I have never found any gluten added to the few I have seen. I am not very fond of them so I don't usually drink them. A wine cooler is usually not wine - it is a malt beverage- so it contains gluten.

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Wine is gluten free.  Wine spritzer drinks may not be. 

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Wines are known for causing reactions, though gluten is not the problem. Many of them contain so many ingredients that it would be impossible to guess what was causing a reaction when no ingredients are listed.

Here is a link to an article that talks about why vintners don't list ingredients. And grapes are often a crop that is doused heavily in pesticides and herbicides so if you react, it might even be to a residue of something toxic left on the grapes themselves. When I buy wine, I buy organic. But you might also have luck by going to a local winery near you where you can ask them about their ingredients. I also presume that the more commercial the process, the more likely the ingredients lists were determined in a lab rather than just being good, old-fashioned wine making.

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/06/05/dining/the-big-question-whats-in-wine.html?_r=0

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Here is a link to an article that talks about why vintners don't list ingredients. And grapes are often a crop that is doused heavily in pesticides and herbicides so if you react, it might even be to a residue of something toxic left on the grapes themselves

How about buying a good quality wine and drink it and stop worrying about what may or may not be lurking in it, courtesy of all those evil wine makers out to get us?  :blink:

 

 

 

                                                                                                                                                                                                             -LTES-

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Here is a link to an article that talks about why vintners don't list ingredients. And grapes are often a crop that is doused heavily in pesticides and herbicides so if you react, it might even be to a residue of something toxic left on the grapes themselves. When I buy wine, I buy organic. But you might also have luck by going to a local winery near you where you can ask them about their ingredients. I also presume that the more commercial the process, the more likely the ingredients lists were determined in a lab rather than just being good, old-fashioned wine making.

 

 

Thanks for the linked article, Naturechick.  It's totally correct in it's premise that we normally consider wine 'unprocessed' and elemental.  For those of us in the world who are trying to be mindful of what we are putting into our bodies aside from just gluten (and mindful of what effect massive production/agricultural processes are doing to the ecosystems), it's a great starting off article to investigate it further. Organic wine - I'll have to look harder for it.

 

Thanks! :)

Kamma

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Hi everyone,

Sheesh! I'm so sorry I took so long to reply . I've been gluten free since 2006, so it's not that. I'm positive I've had a gluten reaction from wine, it's just that ... after being gluten free for so long, I really know what a gluten reaction feels like. It took me a long time to believe it was true and not something else but I don't react to sulfites, grapes or pesticides. Furthermore, I don't react to yellowtail wine, bearfoot wine (but I don't like it!) and Mission Hill wine that was made in the stainless steel containers.

I react very badly to less ppm than anyone I know. I don't react to certified gluten free products but I've reacted to products that simply say "gluten free" on the label a bunch! I know there are a ton of celiacs out there that don't react to any wines whatsoever but it just seems I'm significantly more sensitive than average :(

Just was looking for anyone who is super sensitive that could expand my wine options?

And I did want to say thank you to everyone that answered and tried to help!

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Ive been gluten-free for 4 years.. although I never worried about cross contamination until recently. (Not sure if im allergic or celiac). Recently ive become VERY sensitive. . And I react to wine..you can remove gluten (wine made in barrels or its fining process can intro a cross contamination. .removed to me is still contaminated..now).. im trying desperately to find a "safe list" for me so I can dine out without frustration)... if you are super sensitive like me its the equivalent of taking a bun off your burger and calling it gluten-free...not everyone can do that..:-)

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Hi Sara and Welcome to the Forum.

 

Just a note to future readers of this thread.  No Celiac can safely take a burger off of a bun and eat it, super-sensitive or not.  

 

As for wines, I will let others SS's answer you.

 

Again, Welcome.

 

Colleen

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Here's an interesting one my husband came across in a Southwest travel magazine:

 

http://www.freywine.com/

 

This is the quote from their website: 

 

Frey Organic Wines are Vegan and Gluten Free: No Animal or Gluten-Based Fining Agents Used What are Fining Agents?

Since ancient times, fining agents have been added to a barrel or tank of wine to help clarify and stabilize the wine. They drift through the wine, pick up solid matter, and eventually sink to the bottom of the container. Common fining agents include hydrolyzed wheat gluten isolate, pea protein isolate, casein (milk protein), gelatin, egg whites, fish glue, and natural bentonite clay. Once the fining agent settles at the bottom, the clarified wine is siphoned off the top, leaving behind the residue, which is discarded. Although no trace of these products is found in the bottled wine, some consumers may object to their use. At Frey Vineyards we use only bentonite, a natural earth clay, as the fining agent for our white wines. (Frey red wines are not fined).

 

I will be looking for this wine in my area. I usually worry more about casein with wine fining, but this is safe on all accounts.

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If you look up "fining wine", a google search will lead you to many websites from Wiki to wine magazines to wine makers who list potentiial fining agents. Not a single one of them mentions wheat.

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This study looks at wine that is fined with wheat: http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/jf104490z?journalCode=jafcau, so the concept does exist.

 

I agree that wheat is not a common fining agent, and not something for most celiacs to worry about. This Wine Spectator article states this. It also discusses the practice of sealing barrels with wheat paste, which does happen and actually is what gives me pause with red wine from oak barrels:   http://www.winespectator.com/webfeature/show/id/48789

 

For the most sensitive among us, it's nice to have a link to a vineyard who you don't have to chase down to question their winemaking techniques.

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If you read the articles again you will see that the first article says wheat has been PROPOSED as a fining agent. After running their test they decided it would not be a GOOD proposal.

 

The second article says wheat is very rarely used anymore and that wines from those small percentage of wineries who still use it, the wine tests to less than 10 PPM and in most cases, 5 PPM. In order to be labeled gluten-free in this country, (even certified gluten-free foods) any food or drink items must test to 20PPM or less. That would mean there is the POTENTIAL for ANY gluten-free item you buy in the store to have more PPM than any wine you might buy.

 

So if you feel you might react to 10 PPM or less, you should probably avoid all gluten-free foods on the chance that they might have more. It would be best to just stick to whole foods if you are that sensitive.

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