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Would Anything In Here Cause A Reaction?
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19 posts in this topic

Hey all...a little over a month ago I made bread from Against All Grain.  I was really excited to try it because I've been missing bread.  Got all the ingredients...made it.  It was decent.  Wouldn't want it for a turkey sandwich, but toasted with preserves it was good.  

 

I ate a few slices over a couple of days and then started not feeling well.  Froze the remainder.  I felt bad for a few weeks...went back to the chicken and rice type thing, added a food or 2 a day, kept a food journal.  Things were improving.  Saw the bread in the freezer last week and really wanted some.  Had 2 slices over 2 days and started feeling bad again.  

 

Started going over things with my husband and he said isn't that the bread you had been eating the last time you started feeling bad?  Yep.

 

So...does anything in here stand out as causing issues?  I will say that I have eggs, honey, baking soda and sea salt other times without any issues.

 

Ingredients:

 

Cashew Butter

Eggs

Honey

Apple Cider Vinegar

Almond Milk

Coconut Flour (I used Bob's Red Mill)

Baking Soda 

Sea Salt

 

 

Thanks!

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Maybe the eggs? I think you told me on another post you were newly diagnosed? sorry, I can't remember? I am... I had to cut out dairy and eggs. I don't know if it's permanent yet.

I'm sure someone else will have ideas...

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Maybe the eggs? I think you told me on another post you were newly diagnosed? sorry, I can't remember? I am... I had to cut out dairy and eggs. I don't know if it's permanent yet.

I'm sure someone else will have ideas...

I eat eggs on their own and in other things without issues though. I don't know...It's constantly frustrating. Feels like I get one thing figured out and something else happens.
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Is the flour processed in a gluten-free facility? (not familiar with Bob's Red Mill)

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Hi Iceland.

 

You may not get much help with this.  None of the ingredients would bother me but may bother someone else.  The way to find out it to eat one single ingredient and see if you have a problem...Test them all.

 

Good luck.

 

Colleen

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Is the flour processed in a gluten-free facility? (not familiar with Bob's Red Mill)

It says Gluten Free...but who the heck knows?

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Sounds like a very " rich" bread. Maybe its a bit too fatty?

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Hi Iceland.

 

You may not get much help with this.  None of the ingredients would bother me but may bother someone else.  The way to find out it to eat one single ingredient and see if you have a problem...Test them all.

 

Good luck.

 

Colleen

I kind of figured....just wondering if anyone would pop up and say , "I always feel bad when I eat coconut flour."  Or something like that.   :)

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Sounds like a very " rich" bread. Maybe its a bit too fatty?

Interesting...hadn't thought of that part...although when I was making it I was like 4 eggs?  1 cup of cashew butter?  Maybe it is the fat.  Thanks

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Yeah, I have found that I do not handle fatty things very well just yet. If I eat something high in fat I get pain, bloating, gas and diarrhea. Some celiacs just don't process fat well for quite sometime after going gluten-free, hopefully it will improve over time.

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Yeah, I have found that I do not handle fatty things very well just yet. If I eat something high in fat I get pain, bloating, gas and diarrhea. Some celiacs just don't process fat well for quite sometime after going gluten-free, hopefully it will improve over time.

Ok, it's definitely a possibility.  The rest of the time I don't really eat a lot of fat.  Thanks for the responses!

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Bobs red mill is pretty good with their gluten free stuff, but they do sell some gluten-free and non gluten-free versions of the same items, so it is possible to pick up the wrong one by accident.

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Bobs red mill is pretty good with their gluten free stuff, but they do sell some gluten-free and non gluten-free versions of the same items, so it is possible to pick up the wrong one by accident.

You're right. I did check mine and it says gluten free.
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Yeah, I have found that I do not handle fatty things very well just yet. If I eat something high in fat I get pain, bloating, gas and diarrhea. Some celiacs just don't process fat well for quite sometime after going gluten-free, hopefully it will improve over time.

Reading your signature...saw the gallbladder thing and it made think. I had mine out on February 12th...and now I remember being told that getting that out caused some people to have more difficulty with fats. I'm really kind of thinking it's that. So glad I posted this.
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If it were me, I would bet the almond milk or cashew butter because I am allergic to tree nuts, plus nuts are hard to digest in general with intestinal damage. Coconut makes me sick starting with nausea and ingestion and continuing on! I have tested coconut milk, organic oil, coconut frozen dessert and just plain old coconut and it makes me sick. I can tolerate coconut oil that is refined and probably has no nutritional value other than calories.

I do not have a gallbladder and my diet is more than 50% fat to control my blood sugar and I do well. You can develop intolerances at any time. That is my two cents!

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Reading your signature...saw the gallbladder thing and it made think. I had mine out on February 12th...and now I remember being told that getting that out caused some people to have more difficulty with fats. I'm really kind of thinking it's that. So glad I posted this.

Yes, not having a gallbladder can compound that problem. In any case, my GI doc says that it should improve over time, I just have the double whammy of having Celiac Disease and no gallbladder, both things that can make processing fat difficult.

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If it were me, I would bet the almond milk or cashew butter because I am allergic to tree nuts, plus nuts are hard to digest in general with intestinal damage. Coconut makes me sick starting with nausea and ingestion and continuing on! I have tested coconut milk, organic oil, coconut frozen dessert and just plain old coconut and it makes me sick. I can tolerate coconut oil that is refined and probably has no nutritional value other than calories.

I do not have a gallbladder and my diet is more than 50% fat to control my blood sugar and I do well. You can develop intolerances at any time. That is my two cents!

I drink coconut water every day without issues and eat almonds without any problem so I'm thinking no...but who knows.
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Knowing symptoms more in depth than "not feeling well" would really help in coming up with ideas for possible problems. For instance, diarrhea or cramping would be more likely to be one thing and constipation another.

If I had to find reasons to suspect ingredients in that bread, I'd consider:

1. Honey is high in fructose. Fructose is a common food intolerance and after going gluten-free, many people realize they have reactions to foods they didn't notice before. And fructose intolerance is more an issue of volume and being balanced out with glucose and proteins in the meals, rather than just ingredients. So you could react to an ingredient that is high in fructose in one meal but not another. If you suspect fructose is a problem for you, you might be reacting to fructans as well so something else to research.

2. Fat overload from the nuts. The gallbladder, pancreas, and lymphatic system all play a part in digesting fats, and all of them are on gluten's list of favorite organs to attack. Difficulty digesting fats could be a temporary problem if you're early in the gluten-free process and haven't had time to heal. Or it could be something to continue to keep an eye on long term. If fat were the problem I'd expect some noticeable signs in the toilet as well, such as undigested oils floating on the surface after bowel movements. I know, looking at your stool doesn't sound like fun, but it can really help with figuring out digestive problems.

3. Of course the flour or salt could be cross contaminated in the facility where they are processed. I have a couple of powdered spices that I suspect gluten me a tiny bit, but salt has never been one of them, and I would expect Bob's to do a good job in their facility. Those two would not be high on my suspect list.

4. What about the baking pans themselves? Do they have a non-stick coating? Were they in use before going gluten-free? If they aren't new since going gluten-free, I'd suspect them as being a potential source of gluten. Were you using the oven to make other foods that contained gluten right before or while you baked your bread? Or did you put your coconut flour into a container or used a scoop of some sort that used to be used for wheat flour?

Otherwise, others have already covered the other things that come to mind. Sometimes, you just never know.

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Knowing symptoms more in depth than "not feeling well" would really help in coming up with ideas for possible problems. For instance, diarrhea or cramping would be more likely to be one thing and constipation another.

If I had to find reasons to suspect ingredients in that bread, I'd consider:

1. Honey is high in fructose. Fructose is a common food intolerance and after going gluten-free, many people realize they have reactions to foods they didn't notice before. And fructose intolerance is more an issue of volume and being balanced out with glucose and proteins in the meals, rather than just ingredients. So you could react to an ingredient that is high in fructose in one meal but not another. If you suspect fructose is a problem for you, you might be reacting to fructans as well so something else to research.

2. Fat overload from the nuts. The gallbladder, pancreas, and lymphatic system all play a part in digesting fats, and all of them are on gluten's list of favorite organs to attack. Difficulty digesting fats could be a temporary problem if you're early in the gluten-free process and haven't had time to heal. Or it could be something to continue to keep an eye on long term. If fat were the problem I'd expect some noticeable signs in the toilet as well, such as undigested oils floating on the surface after bowel movements. I know, looking at your stool doesn't sound like fun, but it can really help with figuring out digestive problems.

3. Of course the flour or salt could be cross contaminated in the facility where they are processed. I have a couple of powdered spices that I suspect gluten me a tiny bit, but salt has never been one of them, and I would expect Bob's to do a good job in their facility. Those two would not be high on my suspect list.

4. What about the baking pans themselves? Do they have a non-stick coating? Were they in use before going gluten-free? If they aren't new since going gluten-free, I'd suspect them as being a potential source of gluten. Were you using the oven to make other foods that contained gluten right before or while you baked your bread? Or did you put your coconut flour into a container or used a scoop of some sort that used to be used for wheat flour?

Otherwise, others have already covered the other things that come to mind. Sometimes, you just never know.

I'm sorry I left that out. My primary symptoms were GIVEN related...mostly lots of D.

As I said in my post, I have honey other times without issues.

I do think fat may be the issue.

My baking pan is not non-stick and per the recipe I lined it with parchment paper. I threw out all my flours when I was diagnosed and thoroughly cleaned. The only flours I own and use are gluten free.

Thanks

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