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Wine ... Gluten Free?

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#16 kareng

 
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Posted 29 June 2014 - 12:29 PM

Here is the problem with wine. Wine is fermented with yeast. Ingesting yeast and sugar increases growth of Candida, which has been proven to have a surface protein identical to gliadin, as noted in my last post. Therefore, increasing intestinal growth of Candida can cause the same results as ingesting gluten.
"The configurations of the amino acids that make up Hwp-1 protein are very similar to the proteins α-gliadin and γ-gliadin found in gluten (wheat, barley, rye) products."
http://www.yeastinfe...s/#.U7B1HbFBkpo


I am not sure that is actually true, but, I don't have a problem with candida, so I will drink wine if I like. I haven't seen any evidence that Candida causes us to mount the same immune system reaction as gluten does.


http://www.curecelia...ning-ingredient


Once again.... If you think you have a problem with a food, for whatever reason, don't eat or drink it.
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#17 user001

 
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Posted 29 June 2014 - 12:53 PM

Vineyard trips make for a great day trip! Usually a bring your own picnic type thing here in nj and sit out on the farm and sip wine a eat. Bonus- it's totally normal to ask questions about how the wine is made.


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Beef and pork free due to intolerance since 2005, Gluten free since March 2014, Coffee free due to a developed intolerance June 2014, Egg free due to a developed intolerance August 2014
Misdiagnosed since 2000 with chronic fatigue syndrome, major depression and anxiety disorder.
Requested doc test for Celiac disease in April 2014.
Blood test positive for  Celiac disease May 2014.

Celiac Dx confirmed via small intestine biopsy 6/26/14
Fatigue,.depression, anxiety, daily headaches, and a laundry list of other symptoms have diminished slowly since I stopped eating gluten.

Who knows how much longer I would have suffered if I continued to rely on doctors to think of testing me for celiac disease.

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#18 abqmalenurse

 
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Posted 29 June 2014 - 03:18 PM

I'm just passing information along. Anyone can have an opposing view or ignore it if they choose. I wasn't passing anything along which has not been verified by scientific research. If something causes no problem for you, then don't avoid it.


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137 IQ

Nurse for 20 years, abdomino/thoracic, cardiac, ICU, CCU, ER, neuro/neurosurgery, hospice, infectious disease.

Certified chef, auto/diesel/turbine mechanic, freelance writer.

Gluten free since 2006.

Hobbies-blogging, cooking, photography, gardening (giant crops frequently), developing gardening methods for arid environments, experimenting with alternative electrical generation methods, solar design.


#19 psawyer

 
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Posted 29 June 2014 - 08:50 PM

All of the major recognized celiac support experts and associations list wine as safe. It unlikely that they are all wrong, but make your own decision. I know what mine is: I consider wine safe, without hesitation.
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#20 abqmalenurse

 
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Posted 29 June 2014 - 09:48 PM

I enjoy wine, myself. And gluten free beer and occasional distilled alcohol. I am not trying to tell anyone to avoid alcohol. (Though personally I prefer sweet white wine or dark beer.) Even used to brew my own beer and came up with a couple of good gluten free recipes after learning of my own Celiac condition. I am mentioning what scientific evidence has very recently shown.

 

It has not been that long since virtually nothing was understood about Celiac disease. The knowledge base has expanded very rapidly since I learned of my own condition in 2006 and continues to change and evolve daily. None of us with this condition can state that what was stated yesterday remains true today. It was only recently that Celiac became classified as an auto-immune disorder. So ercent that most medical professionals are not aware of the changed classification unless they have personally encountered a patient or personal acquaintance who has informed them of the change. I had to explain the change to my personal physician in Feb this year.

 

There is a known link between Celiac and a predisposition to Candidiasis. This is well documented.

 

Knowing the things which cause yeast to proliferate in the intestinal tract, coupled with the similarity between Candida and gliadin, it is no great stretch to link Candida, fermented beverages and Celiac symptoms and damage. If a person continues having Cleiac symptoms in spite of a strict gluten free diet, Candida sould be suspected.

 

If I had any end statement to make, it would ultimately be that disilled alcohol has a higher chance of safety than non-distilled alcoholic beverages. Even safer if low in sugar. Distilling kills yeast and the lower the sugar content, the less one feeds existing yeast. Wine is gluten free but definitely not free of yeast. So if one has no problem with Candida proliferation, then by all means enjoy your wine!


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137 IQ

Nurse for 20 years, abdomino/thoracic, cardiac, ICU, CCU, ER, neuro/neurosurgery, hospice, infectious disease.

Certified chef, auto/diesel/turbine mechanic, freelance writer.

Gluten free since 2006.

Hobbies-blogging, cooking, photography, gardening (giant crops frequently), developing gardening methods for arid environments, experimenting with alternative electrical generation methods, solar design.


#21 Pegleg84

 
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Posted 04 July 2014 - 09:16 AM

Wine (unless it's flavoured cooler crud) is gluten free. However, some people have problems with wine due to sulphites or alcohol.

It sounds more likely that you are still rooting out all the gluten in your diet. Your gut is still inflamed and can't handle the wine (and other alcohols too, likely) because of that. You're going to need a few months to allow yourself to heal enough first. A glass might be ok right now, but more than that could cause problems. Same with things like coffee, sodas, etc etc. Anything acidic and known to be an irritant. This has nothing to do with there being gluten in it or not; you gluten-damaged body just can't handle it right now.

 

Go through your cupboards, get rid of anything that could cause cross-contamination, eat lots of basic whole foods (veggies, meat, etc), avoid processed stuff (sugar subtitutes also not a good idea) and be patient.

 

Also, warning: as you heal you might find all you need is one glass. Then you'll actually be absorbing the alcohol and it can hit you harder than you're used to. Takes a while to get your tolerance back up to half-a-bottle level.

 

Of course, once you've gotten all the gluten out for a few months and are still having problems, then you can look at other possibilities: sulphite intolerance is a common one.

 

In the meantime, be patient... and have a glass on me.


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~ Be a light unto yourself. ~ - The Buddha

- Gluten-free since March 2009 (not officially diagnosed, but most likely Celiac). Symptoms have greatly improved or disappeared since.
- Soy intolerant. Dairy free (likely casein intolerant). Problems with eggs, quinoa, brown rice

- mild gastritis seen on endoscopy Oct 2012. Not sure if healed or not.
- Family members with Celiac: Mother, sister, aunt on mother's side, aunt and uncle on father's side, more being diagnosed every year.






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