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Gluten-Free Eggs

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#16 IrishHeart

 
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Posted 04 August 2014 - 12:53 PM

Let's just cut to the chase here. Eggs from chickens or meat from animals....all gluten free.

 

University of Chicago Celiac Disease Research Center

 

 

Should someone with celiac disease worry about eating grain-fed meat?

Grain-fed animal by-products (eggs, meat, etc.) do not have to be avoided for people on a gluten-free diet. Regardless of what an animal eats, the meat from it is gluten-free.

 

 

 

and for the record....I AM a "sensitive" sort...I will react to low CC and trace gluten, I eat eggs. I am fine. 


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#17 MJ_S

 
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Posted 04 August 2014 - 01:39 PM

there is no scientific evidence that shows gluten passes into the egg when fed to the hen

 

Yes, and Jane Anderson explains very well why there is a lack of formal research on this (I included the relevant paragraphs below). I'm also not convinced that the entire gluten protein is inside the egg, rather some broken-down metabolite that some of our bodies are reacting to. Which may be especially pertinent to those suffering from NCGS (as the OP is), since there's so little that's known about that disorder. Per Dr. Fasano, patients with NCGS often report far greater levels of sensitivity than celiacs.

 

http://celiacdisease...Gluten-Free.htm

"Can Gluten-Eating Chickens Produce Gluten-Containing Eggs?

Now, as I said earlier, a few people who are quite sensitive to trace gluten have reported glutenings(i.e., gluten reactions) when they eat eggs from chickens that eat mainly wheat and barley. These same people are fine when they eat eggs they obtain from farmers who don't feed their chickens gluten grains.

Now, this may seem pretty far-fetched, but there's actually a bit of scientific evidence that indicates it may be possible for proteins or protein fragments to pass from chicken feed into the eggs themselves (gluten is a protein).

An Ohio State University graduate student experimented with feeding chickens a diet high in soy protein to see if he could influence the amount of soy isoflavones (a component of soy protein) in those chickens' eggs. He found that he could: chickens fed the high-soy diet routinely produced eggs higher in isoflavones. (You can read the thesis here)

Now, obviously this experiment did not involve gluten grains. However, it's not too much of a stretch to imagine that it's possible for gluten-eating chickens to produce eggs that contain a tiny bit of gluten protein (or, more likely, gluten protein fragments).

If these eggs did have gluten in them, it would be a very small amount — likely far below even 1 part per million (for comparison, foods are generally considered "gluten-free" if they contain fewer than 20 parts per million of gluten, or are less than 0.0001% gluten). Commercially available tests for gluten in foods can't reliably detect gluten below around 3 parts per million, so it's impossible to say how much gluten, if any, actually is in these eggs.

But yes, some people are sensitive to gluten at those levels, and they've reported seeing their symptoms resolve when they drop eggs from gluten-fed chickens. They've been able to eat eggs again by sourcing them directly from farmers who don't feed their chickens gluten grains.

I should point out that there's a growing number of small farmers who advertise soy-free eggs for people who are sensitive to soy proteins. It honestly wouldn't surprise me to see gluten-free eggs advertised in the same way over the next few years."


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#18 beth01

 
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Posted 04 August 2014 - 02:36 PM

Let's for sanity sake of all future celiacs that read this thread, agree to disagree.

 

99.9 percent of celiacs should, and I say "should" be able to eat eggs with no problem. They aren't a gluten containing item.  A very small percentage of people might react to what is fed to the chickens.  THIS IS RARE.  I don't want to have a bunch of newbies running around like chickens with their heads cut off trying to find farmers that don't feed their chickens wheat, you are safe to buy eggs from the grocery store.  Some might not be able to eat egg just because of the effect they have on one's stomach, they tend to cause bloating, gas and diarrhea.  Some can have them baked or cooked into a recipe, and others just can't eat eggs at all.  If they don't bother you, egg away.  If they do, don't eat them or find a balance of what you can handle. But please don't discount them based on a thesis study done on SOY protein not GLUTEN.


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Diagnosed April 7th 2014

#19 notme!

 
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Posted 04 August 2014 - 02:40 PM

Partially digested food and eggs come out of the same "highway".

sort of.  but not.  i understand what you mean, but the egg is already formed by the time they get to the 'exit' 

 

annnnd, just because this needs to be said:

 

guess what????  

chicken butt!!!   :D

 

(sorry lololz)  


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#20 MJ_S

 
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Posted 04 August 2014 - 02:59 PM

Beth, OP posted her question to the super sensitive forum. Not the newbie forum. None of this applies to newbies. That's why there's a sticky at the top of this forum with a big giant DISCLAIMER.  I NEVER would have posted my reply outside of this forum. I thought I was clear with that in my original reply, as well as telling her that she should just try eggs.

 

This is an ongoing problem with the super-sensitive forum. There's a reason this forum exists; there has to be one place where super-sensitives can discuss their experiences without fearing attack (so far that's not the case). I do not post anywhere else on this board. People need to be sensitive to the fact that super-sensitives will post their experiences here and not apologize for it. If I were not super-sensitive, I would simply not read this forum.


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#21 IrishHeart

 
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Posted 04 August 2014 - 03:21 PM

Beth, OP posted her question to the super sensitive forum. Not the newbie forum. None of this applies to newbies. That's why there's a sticky at the top of this forum with a big giant DISCLAIMER.  I NEVER would have posted my reply outside of this forum. I thought I was clear with that in my original reply, as well as telling her that she should just try eggs.

 

This is an ongoing problem with the super-sensitive forum. There's a reason this forum exists; there has to be one place where super-sensitives can discuss their experiences without fearing attack (so far that's not the case). I do not post anywhere else on this board. People need to be sensitive to the fact that super-sensitives will post their experiences here and not apologize for it. If I were not super-sensitive, I would simply not read this forum.

 

 

This is a celiac forum with a sub section for "super sensitives". 

 

i am a sensitive celiac...meaning I do react horribly to trace gluten. I am discussing this with you. 

 

But here is one simple fact: there is no gluten in eggs, period. Sorry.

 

People continue to post the 1 article that involves soy protein and Jane Anderson (the author of the article) herself says:

 

Now, obviously this experiment did not involve gluten grains. However, it's not too much of a stretch to imagine that it's possible for gluten-eating chickens to produce eggs that contain a tiny bit of gluten protein (or, more likely, gluten protein fragments).

 

yeah, sorry, but  it is a stretch.

I do not IMAGINE gluten in anything. It is or it isn't. 


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"Life is not the way it's supposed to be. It's the way it is. The way we cope with it makes the difference." Virginia Satir

"The strongest of all warriors are these two - time and patience." Leo Tolstoy

"If you want to lift yourself up, lift up someone else" Booker T. Washington

“If idiots could fly, the sky would be like an airport.”― Laura Davenport 

"Do or do not. There is no try. "-  Yoda.

"LTES"  Gem 2014

 

Misdiagnosed for 25+ years; Finally Diagnosed with Celiac  11/01/10.  Double DQ2 genes. This thing tried to kill me. I view Celiac as a fire breathing dragon --and I have run my sword right through his throat.
I. Win. bliss-smiley-emoticon.gif


#22 beth01

 
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Posted 04 August 2014 - 03:25 PM

Having been a new person on this forum recently, it is hard to navigate when doing searches.  If you search egg sensitivity every thread with those words pops up and it isn't sorted by where it is found on the forum, so yes a newbie could read this.  If you look at the forum by "new content", it also comes up.  Not everyone who looks these things up happen to notice the dates that things are discussed or what part of the forum they are found in.

 

I am not discounting anyone's sensitivities, I have my own.

 

I am also not going to apologize for writing what I did because I for one don't agree with people constantly quoting "research" or articles which really have no bearing to the original subject which then is misleading to others that read these threads later, research and articles that are based on suppositions such as the one you quoted.  This " research" has nothing to do with gluten found in eggs, it's soy.  One has nothing to do with the other and hasn't been proven to correlate. Not everyone has that thought process and while you are entitled to your opinion, I am in turn entitled to mine.


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#23 dilettantesteph

 
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Posted 05 August 2014 - 06:22 AM

Since no one has thrown out the technical terms here yet, here is a good page that explains things so we can all be familiar with the process:  http://www.afn.org/~poultry/egghen.htm  ----DONT CLICK IF YOU DO NOT WANT TO SEE CHICKEN BUTT PICTURES--------

 

From picture 1 to picture 2 where the egg is laid, a new hole appears.  That seems strange to me, but I have an appointment and can't research it now.  Anyone?


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#24 kareng

 
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Posted 05 August 2014 - 06:28 AM

From picture 1 to picture 2 where the egg is laid, a new hole appears.  That seems strange to me, but I have an appointment and can't research it now.  Anyone?


It's not a new hole. It explains that some " membrane" or wall gets compressed down and covers the other pipe as the egg passes by.

Now. I know nothing about chickens but I trust that Laura has found us some correct info. Perhaps you can find some more anatomically detailed drawings or photos that would ease your mind?

But really - eggs are washed and the shells can be washed at home before cracking if you(a general "you" not directed at Steph specifically)  would like.  Or just don't eat them if you all have an issue with them.  Maybe try quail or duck eggs?


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#25 dilettantesteph

 
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Posted 05 August 2014 - 10:21 AM

Thanks Kareng, I guess the diagram was missing the mutual oriface that both of those passageways went through.  I thought it was illustrating a new hole being created as the egg was coming out.  I guess I like my pictures to be more scientifically complete.


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#26 dilettantesteph

 
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Posted 06 August 2014 - 06:13 AM

I can't find a better diagram.  It concerns me that the information comes from someone's blog, is a drawing and doesn't appear to have any backing.  A search of the author's name did not turn up any credentials.

 

I did find this from the USDA: http://www.fsis.usda...6X8BA0y58g!!/#3

 

It says: "Bacteria can be on the outside of a shell egg. That's because the egg exits the hen's body through the same passageway as feces is excreted. That's why eggs are required to be washed at the processing plant. All USDA graded eggs and most large volume processors follow the washing step with a sanitizing rinse at the processing plant. It is also possible for eggs to become infected by Salmonella Enteritidis fecal contamination through the pores of the shells after they're laid."

 

That is why you aren't supposed to eat raw eggs.


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#27 Gemini

 
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Posted 06 August 2014 - 08:50 AM

WOW!  This is one dead horse people continue to beat....... :rolleyes:

 

As for not eating raw eggs........I am not giving up gluten-free cookie dough! :ph34r:


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#28 kareng

 
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Posted 06 August 2014 - 09:06 AM

I can't find a better diagram.  It concerns me that the information comes from someone's blog, is a drawing and doesn't appear to have any backing.  A search of the author's name did not turn up any credentials.

 

I did find this from the USDA: http://www.fsis.usda...6X8BA0y58g!!/#3

 

It says: "Bacteria can be on the outside of a shell egg. That's because the egg exits the hen's body through the same passageway as feces is excreted. That's why eggs are required to be washed at the processing plant. All USDA graded eggs and most large volume processors follow the washing step with a sanitizing rinse at the processing plant. It is also possible for eggs to become infected by Salmonella Enteritidis fecal contamination through the pores of the shells after they're laid."

 

That is why you aren't supposed to eat raw eggs.

 

 

Ok.....  but the question was gluten inside an egg....    This link does say that the eggs are washed on the outside.

 

which leads me back to - eat them or don't - for whatever reason. 

 

 

To me, this appears to be the "Extra Super  Sensitive" answer - If you are seriously worried about the eggs but want them anyway - you have to grow your own or find someone to do it for you to your specifications.


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#29 Shell156

 
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Posted 06 August 2014 - 11:33 AM

Hmmm... This is interesting. I don't react to any eggs but I just wanted to offer support for MJ_S and dilettantesteph.

I understand that we don't want to scare people into eating absolutely nothing, but both of their experiences sound valid to me. While we don't want to post random information on the internet , stories from thoughtful people are paramount to learning. Narratives are so important especially here since not all research has been done!

I appreciate scientific research and use it a ton. However just because their experience has not been proven by science does not mean it's not true.

I think what they are trying to say is please eat eggs, but if you find react, try a gluten free feed egg source . If you do not react to eggs fed gluten free feed, then you can continue to enjoy eggs. Hurrah !!

I'm a big fan of being mindful and paying attention to what makes you feel best :)
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#30 dilettantesteph

 
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Posted 06 August 2014 - 02:34 PM

I think what they are trying to say is please eat eggs, but if you find react, try a gluten free feed egg source . If you do not react to eggs fed gluten free feed, then you can continue to enjoy eggs. Hurrah !!
 

 

Thank you for understanding the point that I was trying to make.  Thank you for restating it in a way that might make sense to others.  I find eggs a valuable addition to my diet.


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