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Gluten-Free Eggs

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#31 IrishHeart

 
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Posted 06 August 2014 - 02:52 PM

Hmmm... This is interesting. I don't react to any eggs but I just wanted to offer support for MJ_S and dilettantesteph.

I understand that we don't want to scare people into eating absolutely nothing, but both of their experiences sound valid to me. While we don't want to post random information on the internet , stories from thoughtful people are paramount to learning. Narratives are so important especially here since not all research has been done!

I appreciate scientific research and use it a ton. However just because their experience has not been proven by science does not mean it's not true.

I think what they are trying to say is please eat eggs, but if you find react, try a gluten free feed egg source . If you do not react to eggs fed gluten free feed, then you can continue to enjoy eggs. Hurrah !!

I'm a big fan of being mindful and paying attention to what makes you feel best :)

 

 

and I will reiterate what I said recently on another seemingly " innocent post" asking about pineapple until it became a giant bag of paranoia.

 

No one is discounting anyone's discomfort from eating eggs. Not at all! :)

 

We all recognize other food intolerances (I have some myself!) and a histamine intolerance.

 

(I could not eat eggs for YEARS)

 

We are saying it is not a gluten issue,. 

 

 

here is what I said on that thread:

Some of us gave simple answers in response. My opinion (for what that is still worth around here after all this time is....)  "probably not, hon. Maybe something else caused your discomfort."

It's pineapple. It's gluten free. I eat it. 

 

Some gave elaborate "what ifs" and other various scenarios...because, well, we may be construed as a "helpful bunch" with lots of stories to tell. LOL

 

And it's now JULY 31, and I kept watching this thread --purely out of curiosity just for this one sole 

purpose....to see if the OP ever comes back to say anything.

 

She has not returned to utter a peep.  And as happens often, by now,  she's probably thinking "I'm fine now, it was just  a bit of gastritis... and I'm sorry I asked". 

 

Just wanted to share my observations.   ^_^

 

 

 

SAME THING HAPPENED HERE.

 

NICE NEW PERSON ASKS ABOUT EGGS....PEOPLE SCARE HER OFF.....SHE HAS NOT COME BACK. :(thiS HAPPENS OFTEN!

 

AND IT BECOMES A PIT OF SPECULATION, ANXIETY AND UNNECESSARY CONCERN.

 

IT'S AN EGG. IT'S GLUTEN FREE. EAT THEM IF YOU TOLERATE THEM. BUT THERE IS NO GLUTEN BEING PASSED FROM THE CHICKEN TO THE EGG........ PERIOD.

 

not A SINGLE SCIENTIFIC SOURCE. NO CELIAC RESEARCHERS SAYING ANYTHING ALARMING ABOUT EGGS AND GLUTEN!!!

 

THIS SHOULD APPEAL TO THE SCIENTISTS IN THE 'GROUP' AND ANY OTHER REASONABLE PERSON READING THIS THREAD.

 

ps. THE CAPS ARE NOT BECAUSE I AM YELLING LOL :D 

 

IT'S TO SET THIS MESSAGE APART FROM MY PREVIOUS ONE ^_^ .

 

PEACE OUT. IH


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"Life is not the way it's supposed to be. It's the way it is. The way we cope with it makes the difference." Virginia Satir

"The strongest of all warriors are these two - time and patience." Leo Tolstoy

"If you want to lift yourself up, lift up someone else" Booker T. Washington

“If idiots could fly, the sky would be like an airport.”― Laura Davenport 

"Do or do not. There is no try. "-  Yoda.

"LTES"  Gem 2014

 

Misdiagnosed for 25+ years; Finally Diagnosed with Celiac  11/01/10.  Double DQ2 genes. This thing tried to kill me. I view Celiac as a fire breathing dragon --and I have run my sword right through his throat.
I. Win. bliss-smiley-emoticon.gif


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#32 Bear with me!

 
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Posted 06 August 2014 - 06:35 PM

I wuz tinking 'bout saying sumting 'bout eggs being gluten-free, but I chickened out. :( Maybe somebody will egg me on. Eggs work for me.
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#33 GottaSki

 
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Posted 06 August 2014 - 06:48 PM

The incredible edible egg! Recently got them back in moderation...so thankful to have them back in my safe foods. Never removed due to gluten...eggs are gluten-free and one of the best portable protein sources ever!
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-Lisa

Undiagnosed Celiac Disease ~ 43 years

3/26/09 gluten-free - dignosed celiac - blood 3/3/09, biopsy 3/26/09, double DQ2 / single DQ8 positive

10/25/13 - MCAD

Health history since celiac diagnosis became too long -- moved to the "about me" section of my profile

My children and I all have multiple copies of the genes for Celiac Disease, along with large variety of symptoms/resolution gluten-free

Current tally from me, three kids and two grands: 4 diagnosed with Celiac Disease, 2 NCGS

Get PROPERLY tested BEFORE REMOVING GLUTEN.

ALWAYS independently research health related information found on internet forums/blogs.

"LTES" a Gem :)


#34 IrishHeart

 
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Posted 07 August 2014 - 04:16 AM

I wuz tinking 'bout saying sumting 'bout eggs being gluten-free, but I chickened out. :( Maybe somebody will egg me on. Eggs work for me.

 

 

EGGsactly! beary Smart bear.


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"Life is not the way it's supposed to be. It's the way it is. The way we cope with it makes the difference." Virginia Satir

"The strongest of all warriors are these two - time and patience." Leo Tolstoy

"If you want to lift yourself up, lift up someone else" Booker T. Washington

“If idiots could fly, the sky would be like an airport.”― Laura Davenport 

"Do or do not. There is no try. "-  Yoda.

"LTES"  Gem 2014

 

Misdiagnosed for 25+ years; Finally Diagnosed with Celiac  11/01/10.  Double DQ2 genes. This thing tried to kill me. I view Celiac as a fire breathing dragon --and I have run my sword right through his throat.
I. Win. bliss-smiley-emoticon.gif


#35 dilettantesteph

 
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Posted 07 August 2014 - 06:15 AM

The OP asked this: "I've read that people who are super-sensitive like me can sometimes react to eggs if the hens were fed gluten. Have any of you found that there some truth to this?"

 

I answered with my personal experience.  I reacted to eggs.  Later I found that I can eat pasture fed eggs that don't get supplemental feed in the summer and I freeze these for the winter. 

 

Did I do something wrong?


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#36 nvsmom

 
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Posted 08 August 2014 - 04:56 PM

The OP asked this: "I've read that people who are super-sensitive like me can sometimes react to eggs if the hens were fed gluten. Have any of you found that there some truth to this?"

 

I answered with my personal experience.  I reacted to eggs.  Later I found that I can eat pasture fed eggs that don't get supplemental feed in the summer and I freeze these for the winter. 

 

Did I do something wrong?

 

I think the disagreement is coming from the fact that you were not reacting to gluten in an egg (because as far as tests can find, gluten is not there) but to the egg itself. The chicken that made that egg was eating grains (with gluten in it) and that resulted in an egg that did not agree with you, but it is not because you were reacting to gluten.  It is an intolerance to the egg from a grain fed chicken but not a gluten reaction.  It's just like the fact that I feel pain when I eat apples but it's not because my apple rolled on flour on the grocery conveyor belt or because wheat was in the compost.  KWIM?

 

So I guess technically someone who considers themselves super sensitive (although I often consider it super-reactive rather than super sensitive) could react to eggs from gluten fed chickens, but it's not a gluten reaction, just like some will react to apples or tomatoes or coffee - it's not a gluten reaction (although in the short term it feels identical to me).

 

I'm glad you found eggs that work for you.


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#37 dilettantesteph

 
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Posted 09 August 2014 - 03:22 AM

I think the disagreement is coming from the fact that you were not reacting to gluten in an egg (because as far as tests can find, gluten is not there) but to the egg itself. The chicken that made that egg was eating grains (with gluten in it) and that resulted in an egg that did not agree with you, but it is not because you were reacting to gluten.  It is an intolerance to the egg from a grain fed chicken but not a gluten reaction.  It's just like the fact that I feel pain when I eat apples but it's not because my apple rolled on flour on the grocery conveyor belt or because wheat was in the compost.  KWIM?

 

So I guess technically someone who considers themselves super sensitive (although I often consider it super-reactive rather than super sensitive) could react to eggs from gluten fed chickens, but it's not a gluten reaction, just like some will react to apples or tomatoes or coffee - it's not a gluten reaction (although in the short term it feels identical to me).

 

I'm glad you found eggs that work for you.

I don't understand how this relates to what I said.  I said "I don't know if it is the feed, or something else about the winter, like not being in the sun."  


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#38 beth01

 
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Posted 09 August 2014 - 11:49 PM

I am just explaining this from what I see out of this whole thread.  And I would like to state that I didn't pipe in until supposed research articles were brought up that had no scientific bearing as to the original subject, only someone's mapped out view of getting from point A to C but skipping B. It bothers me when people compare apples to oranges, I would never put apples in my orange chicken.  But any who, from my point of view: when some things that are proven to be scientific fact are contradicted without scientific backing and just based on personal experience only, it can be misleading to others that don't have years of diagnosed celiac experience under their belts.  Frankly if we all think about it, we all have so many quirks in our diets that any number of things can cause glutening symptoms and sometimes we aren't even looking in the right direction.  You could be blaming the apple when it could be the orange. I am four months into this and I spend so much time trying to find hidden sources of gluten when I feel ill that I totally missed the soy that made me feel like crap for two solid weeks ( can't get off the couch, sleep all day, a few trips to the doctor, sick). In my defense since I do keep a diary, I didn't buy the new product, my boyfriend did and never really looked at the sticks as I was putting it on anything I would normally put butter on, so I wasn't looking in that direction.  Thought I was doing myself a favor by staying away from butter due to a dairy issue, boy was I wrong.  Quit using the butter substitute and felt like a new person almost a day later.  We as new people have enough things to look out for than searching for hidden problems, problems that so far are proven to not be hidden or a problem. I say so far, because like I said before, I am not discounting anyone's sensitivities.  And to me from personal experience, it seems so hard to figure out in the beginning just how "sensitive" you are to a glutening ( whether it be from a crumb or eating something <20 ppm and having a reaction) because it seems almost everything bothers your stomach.  And no matter if this is under the " super sensitive" or not, anyone can read it. If anyone has a "sensitivity" that is scientifically proven to not cause a problem, someone is going to post the data that states " gluten or such is not found in wherever" just so people don't go looking for problems where they aren't. Once again, not to discount a sensitivity.  The non " super sensitive's" are not picking on those who are sensitive, just stating scientific fact.  And hey, since there is so much to be learned, it might someday be disproven.  But honestly, no matter how it is worded it makes those that try to make a point of it not being fact, sound insensitive to other's sensitivities.  It's a never ending, vicious cycle.

 

A celiac's diet is so open to interpretation in general due to the fact that it isn't just gluten we all have a problem with, there is so much more and it varies so much from person to person. The only thing we all as a whole have in common is gluten. From there we are all snowflakes, no two celiacs are the same.


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#39 dilettantesteph

 
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Posted 10 August 2014 - 07:53 AM

The only scientific  information I gave was from the USDA.


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#40 LauraTX

 
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Posted 10 August 2014 - 03:49 PM

...From there we are all snowflakes, no two celiacs are the same.

 

I am going to use this line in the future, haha :)


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#41 IrishHeart

 
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Posted 10 August 2014 - 04:18 PM

Well, we may manifest different symptoms yes.....and we may have different challenges, other AI diseases in addition to celiac (diabetes, lupus, thyroid, OA, RA, etc....or other food intolerances,  but here is the part I always wish to point out: we are all alike in this one regard:

 

A smidge of gluten sparks the autoimmune response. In ANY celiac gut. Period.

 

Why does that make us "different"? It doesn't!

 

Does that mean we are all "super sensitive" then? No. This concept means that some may react more violently with more obvious symptoms...like nausea or diarrhea, etc.........but we are ALL in the same boat. 

 

I usually have symptoms shortly after trace CC...they run the gamut from D to cramping, sweating, insomnia, hair loss, joint pain, muscle pain, foggy mind, exhaustion etc.,

but they pass in a week or so. I think I am "very sensitive" to trace gluten as a result --as does my GI doctor. 

 

However...

 

It's just that most of us don't talk incessantly about it, let it rule us, make us paranoid or wonder about things like eggs, toilet paper rolls,

books, the soil a potato is grown in or any other number of bizarre speculative ideas I read on a daily basis on a number of websites.

 

If anyone reads the research about celiac, you will see that the ingestion of gluten causes the EXACT SAME AUTOIMMUNE CASCADE in everyone.  It's not exclusive or special.


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"Life is not the way it's supposed to be. It's the way it is. The way we cope with it makes the difference." Virginia Satir

"The strongest of all warriors are these two - time and patience." Leo Tolstoy

"If you want to lift yourself up, lift up someone else" Booker T. Washington

“If idiots could fly, the sky would be like an airport.”― Laura Davenport 

"Do or do not. There is no try. "-  Yoda.

"LTES"  Gem 2014

 

Misdiagnosed for 25+ years; Finally Diagnosed with Celiac  11/01/10.  Double DQ2 genes. This thing tried to kill me. I view Celiac as a fire breathing dragon --and I have run my sword right through his throat.
I. Win. bliss-smiley-emoticon.gif


#42 Gemini

 
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Posted 10 August 2014 - 04:40 PM

Very nice post, IrishHeart, and I couldn't agree more!    :)


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#43 dilettantesteph

 
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Posted 10 August 2014 - 04:59 PM

The science does not agree with you, Irishheart:

http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/17209192

"After a baseline evaluation (t0), patients were assigned to ingest daily for 90 d a capsule containing 0, 10, or 50 mg gluten."

"One patient (challenged with 10 mg gluten) developed a clinical relapse."

The others did not.  That "smidge" of gluten did not cause a response in those patients, only in the one.

 

http://ajcn.nutritio...86/1/260.1.long

"The study by Catassi et al also implies that minor gluten contamination was not harmful to most of the patients."

"As the study by Catassi et al (1) showed, celiac disease patients respond individually to small amounts of gluten. The individual variability denotes that the treatment should be individual too."


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#44 dilettantesteph

 
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Posted 10 August 2014 - 05:39 PM

Also: http://www.fda.gov/d...h/UCM264152.pdf

Health Hazard Assessment for Gluten Exposure in Individuals with Celiac Disease:
"Available evidence suggests that many aspects of the response of those afflicted with celiac disease to a gluten challenge vary widely. "

"Because of the significant degree of individual variability in the sensitivity and responsiveness to gluten found in those with celiac disease and the apparently narrow margin in the dose level between the no and low adverse effect levels, the UFs used in the safety assessment may not be adequate. Other UFs may be warranted to provide a sufficient level of protection for gluten-sensitive individuals, especially those who are the most sensitive within thissubgroup of individuals with celiac disease,"


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#45 LauraTX

 
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Posted 10 August 2014 - 11:02 PM

The science does not agree with you, Irishheart:

http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/17209192

"After a baseline evaluation (t0), patients were assigned to ingest daily for 90 d a capsule containing 0, 10, or 50 mg gluten."

"One patient (challenged with 10 mg gluten) developed a clinical relapse."

The others did not.  That "smidge" of gluten did not cause a response in those patients, only in the one.

 

http://ajcn.nutritio...86/1/260.1.long

"The study by Catassi et al also implies that minor gluten contamination was not harmful to most of the patients."

"As the study by Catassi et al (1) showed, celiac disease patients respond individually to small amounts of gluten. The individual variability denotes that the treatment should be individual too."

 

 

Hi Steph,

While a "smidge" is not really a quantifiable/debatable amount...either way, I am having trouble understanding what you are wanting to debate.  If you would like to discuss the amount of gluten it takes to cause the autoimmune reaction, I can separate this into another post in the proper category and you may get more replies in regard to that there.


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I was diagnosed with Celiac Disease in January 2013. I also have Lupus and Common Variable Immunodeficiency(CVID) for which I am on IVIG.

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