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Deducting Food From Taxes


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26 replies to this topic

#16 tarnalberry

 
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Posted 27 February 2004 - 08:44 AM

That's my boat too. I don't skimp on getting gluten-free breads, but still don't spend nearly enough to get to 7.5% of my budget in medical expenses. (Maybe it's having good insurance, maybe I'm just too healthy? :-) Or too cheap? ;-) )
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Tiffany aka "Have I Mentioned Chocolate Lately?"
Inconclusive Blood Tests, Positive Dietary Results, No Endoscopy
G.F. - September 2003; C.F. - July 2004
Hiker, Yoga Teacher, Engineer, Painter, Be-er of Me
Bellevue, WA

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#17 lovegrov

 
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Posted 27 February 2004 - 09:09 AM

I'm not as healthy as I need to be but my insurance, while sometimes a pain in the rear, covers a lot. When I got sick and was hospitalized for 11 days with what was finally discovered to be celiac, my total bills came to nearly $40,000. I paid about $300 out of pocket. I have to wonder whether a person without insurance would have just died.
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#18 Guest_aramgard_*

 
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Posted 27 February 2004 - 02:19 PM

Try being a person on a retirement income and medicare with an HMO. My Celiac was discovered 50 years after my first symptoms. Now I have a really lowered immune system and need antibiotics and allergy medications a lot. The new medications are out of the question. Last year for one episode of sinus imfections complicated with ear infections it took nearly $700 just for the medications. Now I have another sinus infection complicated with ear infections. My doctor is trying to work with me on generic medications. So I guess I am now a second class citizen, only allowed the old medications because the new ones are not covered by my HMO. Our country's medical system really needs revamping. I can just imagine how someone just on medicare must feel with no medication reimbursement. Yipes do we need a revamp of our entire health care system. Shirley
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#19 tammy

 
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Posted 08 March 2004 - 04:43 PM

Hi Mariann,

I have the same question. My diagnosis came from Enterolab and too boot, my gene test revealed that I do not have the exact genes for celiac. However, I still must adhere to a gluten-free/CF lifestyle.
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#20 deweyhughie

 
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Posted 10 March 2004 - 07:04 PM

Tammy,

This is fascinating! You had the (very expensive) genetic testing done and you do NOT have the gene? Yet the Enterolab test said you have Celiac?

I have often questioned the validity of the Enterolab test. If my understanding of your post is correct, then the only conclusion I can draw is the Enterolab test is totally unreliable! All current medical research in Celiac says that if you do not have the gene, you CANNOT have Celiac Disease! Period!

As to the validity of the Enterolab diagnosis for tax purposes, even discounting the above, I would not want to have to try to make THAT case to an auditor! I'm no tax specialist, but I would bet that the diagnosis has to come from a gastroenterologist in order to be deductible.
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Best wishes,
Dewey
Marion, IA

#21 Guest_jhmom_*

 
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Posted 10 March 2004 - 07:36 PM

From my understanding you do not have to specify what your deductions are for, you add it to your health deductions and of course keep all receipts proving the extra cost (that's what I did).

Do not include your doctors letter, your receipts or your schedule showing how you computed your deduction for gluten-free foods. Save these documents which should be submitted only in the event you are audited by IRS or your state's taxing authority.



I used Enterolab and was diagnosed with gluten sensitivity and trust them COMPLETELY!! I think a lot of people including myself use the term "Celiac" because you don't get that dumb founded look from people when explaining what is wrong with you. But BOTH are treated the same way, a strict adherence to a gluten-free diet for life. I am not sure Tammy but did Dr. Fine say you have the actual disease or just gluten sensitivty???
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#22 gf4life

 
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Posted 10 March 2004 - 07:57 PM

You can be gluten intolerant/sensitive without being Celiac. It is possible to have an intolerance to gluten and not have either of the main genes they know causes it. There is still a lot of research to be done and there may be more genetic factors involved than they have found. If you are developing antibodies against gluten, then you can't eat it. Period.

As for the tax deduction. I didn't come close to the 7.5% threshhold, so it wouldn't matter anyhow. I have good insurance, and although they won't always authorize an expensive test if there is a cheaper one they can do, they have paid close to $100,000 over the past three years for all of my families medical expenses. My husband takes medication for an illness (that he will have for the rest of his life) that costs $1000 a month. If he goes off the medication he has to have a blood test done monthly (right now it is every 2-4 months depending on the doctor and the medication) that has to be sent to UC Davis (in CA) and is also very expensive. Even with that and all the tests the rest of us have done we just don't have enough expenses. That includes all medical copays for doctors and ER visits, dental bills, medication copays, eye exams, glasses & contacts, and the Enterolab tests (if I want to take the chance) and I only made one online order of gluten-free foods, and didn't keep track of other gluten-free foods I bought at the store or what the cost difference was, but it wasn't much. I imagine a whole years worth wouldn't even come close next year either, even for the whole family.

I live in California, and this year we were hit with a users tax. Anything we buy from out of state via mail, phone or internet, and weren't charged sales tax for (and is legally taxable, so this excludes food, thank God!) we have to pay our local sales tax on those items, and the amount is deducted from our state tax return or added to what we owe! Is that just insane. But because we are "using" the product in California we have to pay "users" tax. Is it like this in other states or are we just lucky? :huh: It took me a while to find all my receipts for those things I bought. But since most of them were from the internet I had all my e-mail receipts saved. It cost me $46.00, I could have bought a lot of gluten-free food for $46.00...

God bless,
Mariann
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~West Coast-Central California~

Mariann, gluten intolerant and mother of 3 gluten intolerant children

#23 gf4life

 
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Posted 10 March 2004 - 08:03 PM

Oh and on the Federal Tax form it says under medical expenses "lab tests ordered by your doctor". The Enterolab tests were NOT ordered by my doctor and I am still not sure if they would be legal to deduct, so I am not even going to try next year with my kids tests that I just ordered last month. (I am really paranoid about breaking ANY laws. I don't even go over the speed limit when I drive. It makes my husband nuts, since he generally drives at least 10 miles over the limit.)

Mariann
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~West Coast-Central California~

Mariann, gluten intolerant and mother of 3 gluten intolerant children

#24 Suzn14806

 
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Posted 11 March 2004 - 12:38 AM

Is the FSA an option if I am self-employed? I am guessing if this is an arrangement with an employer that it is not. Although I do have a very nice employer now. ;)
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#25 deweyhughie

 
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Posted 11 March 2004 - 02:21 PM

Sorry, Suzn, I'm almost positive it is not. I had my local IRS office send me all the information relative to cafeteria plans (FSA is a cafeteria plan) and the medical deductions rules about 6 months ago. After reading through all this, I seem to remember it specifically said that cafeteria plans are only available to employees. I guess you could always incorporate and hire yourself! I suspect the paperwork involved in administering an FSA would outweigh the tax benefits.

Mariann, great point about the sensitivity/intolerance. I guess Tammy never specified she was diagnosed with Celiac.
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Best wishes,
Dewey
Marion, IA

#26 ChrissyInNH

 
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Posted 05 April 2004 - 09:41 AM

Hi!

I am a self-dignosed celiac, and so is my 2 year-old son. I am having trouble getting diagnosed officially. I had the blood test and it came up just a hair below positive. My doc then dismissed it and said there was no need to do a biopsy. I believe I do suffer from celiac disease and the reason my test was negative was because I am on Plaquenil for (possible) lupus and autoimmune issues, and it reduces my antibody counts. So, I've fallen through the cracks yet again. :(

Since that happened I decided to take matters into my own hands and put my son and I on a gluten-free diet. The changes in our health are nothing short of amazing! I know I am onto something here.

My question is - if I get tested by Enterolab and get a positive test, is that enough to warrant deducting food from my taxes? What are the rules on this? What about seeing a naturopath? There is apparently a great doc that specializes in celiac disease just an hour away from me in Nashua, NH.

The way I see it - nobody would willingly subject themselves to this diet if they didn't have to. I really feel it is imperative that my son and I remain gluten-free for the rest of our lives. So, why is it so hard to get a diagnosis? My son and I have most of the symptoms, autism runs in my family, I have autoimmune diseases, my grandfather died of colon cancer and my aunt currently has it.

Thanks so much for your input! :)
Christine
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Christine
Gluten-free since 2/2004 for gluten intolerance (celiac negative)
Mom to two gluten-free, soy free, low casein boys

IgG test currently showing intolerance to: casein/dairy, egg, sugar cane, yeast, white potato, coffee, amaranth, blueberry, garlic, kidney beans, sesame, whey, banana, pineapple, pinto beans, radish. Have removed these from diet on 10/28/07.

Not showing intolerance to gluten, wheat, barley, rye, soy, rice, oats or corn at this time, but still totally gluten-free for now.

#27 ChrissyInNH

 
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Posted 07 April 2004 - 04:55 PM

Never mind the above. My post got pinned into this conversation and I had no idea! Now I have the answers. Thanks!

Christine
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Christine
Gluten-free since 2/2004 for gluten intolerance (celiac negative)
Mom to two gluten-free, soy free, low casein boys

IgG test currently showing intolerance to: casein/dairy, egg, sugar cane, yeast, white potato, coffee, amaranth, blueberry, garlic, kidney beans, sesame, whey, banana, pineapple, pinto beans, radish. Have removed these from diet on 10/28/07.

Not showing intolerance to gluten, wheat, barley, rye, soy, rice, oats or corn at this time, but still totally gluten-free for now.




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