Get email alerts Get E-mail Alerts Sponsor: Sponsor:

Ads by Google:

   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE email alerts

Ruby Tuesdays

5 posts in this topic

Hi! I wanted to let everyone know about Ruby Tuesdays. In our town, we don't have too many restaurants to choose from. I refuse to never eat out again...although I love to cook/bake, it's nice to be able to go out to eat.

I realized that with the small offering of places to eat here, I would have to take action to make sure I could A. eat out again, and B. do so safely.

With that in mind, I paid a visit to our local RTuesdays nearly a year ago and asked to speak to the Mgr. I explained about my condition and allergies (I have other food allergies as well) and told him that I would grace their doorstep several times a month if he could help me determine which foods were gluten-free and safe for me to eat.

He was *VERY* helpful and spent a good long time bringing actual labels from products so I could see for myself what I could/could not eat.

Based on what he showed me, I found the following items safe and I've not had any reaction from eating them...

(note: at our local restaurant, the chicken breasts come unmarinated..yours may be different)

Crispy Chicken Club sandwich w/bacon, swiss cheese, and mayo

-- order this with the GRILLED chicken breast. I HATE mayo so I checked and their honey mustard sauce is AOK!

Buffalo & Blue w/buffalo sauce, Mont Jack cheese, mayo

-- again, order this with GRILLED breast. Very tasty!

Burgers -- just hold the bun, watch the dressings..I've not checked ALL of them, not sure on BBQ

Grilled chicken dishes.....plain w/no sauce and no seasoning

veggies - hold the seasoning (not sure about it)

mashed spuds are ok

DO NOT eat any dipping anything from appetizer menu. ALL contain gluten. This includes the con queso dip, spinach dip and other dips. Total bummer!

Anyway, I normally just get the chicken club and bring in my own bun. With the bacon and cheese and honey mustard, it's quite good!

HTH :-)


Share this post

Link to post
Share on other sites

Ads by Google:

Glad to hear about Ruby Tuesdays. We have them here and I always wanted to try them. Thanks for the info! :D


Share this post

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thats great to me. The Ruby Tuesday's near me wasn't too helpful at all. They told me they couldn't guarantee anything was gluten-free! :(


Share this post

Link to post
Share on other sites

I personally would not go by this list, because each restaurant prepares their dishes in different ways. In different states they have different food prep regulations etc. If you really wish to eat will have to sit down with the manager like webgyrl did...and go over each and every item. This will allow you to be more safe and lessen your chances of getting something that is bad.

Even if you do this, you risk the chance of getting a manager who has no idea what you are talking about, and just says "yep that's gluten free" :angry:

Good luck!!

-Jessica :rolleyes:


Share this post

Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree! I really lucked out here as the Mgr just started and was more than willing to help.

Now, we also have a Chili's here. They have a corn tortilla appetizer with chicken and such. I asked the Mgr, the cook, and the waiter (him 4 times) about the ingredients. Was given the all-clear. So, like a boob, I ordered and ate it.

We went to WMart right after and about 10 minutes after we hit the store, I was violently ill. I didn't think I would make it to the bathroom. I have to admit, it must have looked pretty funny to see a grown woman running flat-out through the store. lol.

Anyway, when we got home I called the restaurant and got that idiot mgr on the phone. I told him about my reaction and asked him how that could be since he *assured* me it was safe. He went through the ingredient listing and said it was clean. It contained soy sauce so I asked him if it said anything next to the soy sauce in parantheses. does. :angry: WHEAT.

I really went off on him...I'll not be eating there ever again. In the end it's my fault for not being absolutely certain myself. I did tell him he needs to read ALL the ingredients when a customer has allergies or issues.

But back to topic at hand...don't go by my list. Check it for yourself to be certain :-)


Share this post

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
    • Total Posts
  • Topics

  • Posts

    • Yes, there are other grains that have gluten but they don't have the TYPE of gluten that affects celiacs. Celaics can not have the gluten in wheat, barley, & rye. Corn has gluten but it is not the kind of gluten we react to. I actually use corn gluten in my garden as it prevents weed seeds from sprouting. LOL! Hey, it works great! Read these: Gluten is the name for the protein in grains. All grains contain protein that is theoretically gluten but people with celiac disease and most other gluten allergies only react to the form of gluten found in wheat (including spelt, kamut, triticale and all varieties of wheat), barley, and rye. From:   I've run across another gluten urban legend that needs to be dispelled: the idea that people with celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity actually react to gluten in all grains, not just wheat, barley, rye and sometimes oats. This just isn't true, despite what you might have heard or read. People who react to the gluten protein found in wheat, barley and rye don't automatically need to avoid rice, corn, millet, sorghum and other grains. From:   There are some unsavory sites out there in internet land that will tell you celiacs cross react to all grains. They generally have something to sell, a book, a video, some vitamins or other things. They use scare tactics to sell what they are selling. These claims simply are not true. If they were, then all the people on this site who have gotten well while not eating wheat, barley & rye but continuing to eat rice, quinoa, corn & so forth would not have gotten well; they would be dead by now & there would be no "old timers" on this site because they would have eventually died from eating grains other than wheat, barley & rye. Celiacs can develop sensitivities to other foods, even foods like cabbage or lettuce or potatoes or even rice or maybe only brown rice but that does not mean they are reacting b/c of gluten in those things. You may be doing great since eliminating rice from your diet and that is wonderful that you figured out that it affects you but that does not mean the rice contains the kind of protein that celiacs can not tolerate.  
    • Working a modifying a recipe to be both Vegan and Grain free. I am a bit low on funds right now and can not test it. Feed back is welcome and if you do it perhaps  get me a grams breakdown for duplication. 1 cup almond flour
      ½ cup unsweetened shredded coconut
      1 teaspoons cinnamon
      1 teaspoons apple pie spice
      1 teaspoon baking soda
      ½ teaspoon salt
      ¾ cup unsweetened applesauce
      ½ cup almond butter
      ½ cup Maple/Agave
      2 Tablespoons soft coconut oil
      2 Tablespoons Ground Flax Seed combined with 5 table spoons water whisked and set aside
      1 medium apple, diced small (about 1¼ cups)
      1 cup chopped pecans
      ¼ cup flax seeds

      Preheat oven to 350° F and grease a 9 x 13 inch baking pan.
      In a mixing bowl, whisk together the almond flour, coconut, cinnamon, baking soda, and salt.
      Add the applesauce, almond butter, honey, coconut oil, and ground flax mixture. Beat with a mixer until everything is incorporated.
      Stir in the diced apple, pecans, and flax seeds.
      Spread the batter in the prepared pan and bake for 25min
    • Sorry - didnt realize you couldnt see it. Talked about all grains having gluten.  
    • We can't see the video carle.  The site is banned from celiac com for spamming. Not having seen it, I'd guess they are selling something?
    • Sorry Doit, Ok, I think I see what you are talking about.  The serum IgA test?  The serum IgA is to verify if your body does make IgA antibodies.  Not all of us make that particular antibody type.  you do make IgA antibodies though, and your reading is fairly high.  the way I understand it, the serum IgA is not specific to celiac disease.  It does indicate a level of antibody activity though.  So perhaps you are fighting an infection or something?  Or it is celiac and for some reason your blood levels of antibodies are not high enough to detect right now. The below info on serum IgA is from Quest Labs. ******************************************************************** Test Highlight IgA, Serum    Clinical Use Diagnose IgA deficiencies Determine etiology of recurrent infections Diagnose infection Diagnose inflammation Diagnose IgA monoclonal gammopathy Clinical Background IgA is the first line of defense for the majority of infections at mucosal surfaces and consists of 2 subclasses. IgA1 is the dominant subclass, accounting for 80% to 90% of total serum IgA and greater than half of the IgA in secretions such as milk, saliva, and tears. IgA2, on the other hand, is more concentrated in secretions than in blood. IgA2 is more resistant to proteolytic cleavage and may be more functionally active than IgA1. IgA deficiency is the most prevalent isotype deficiency, occurring in 1/400 to 1/700 individuals. Many patients with IgA deficiency are asymptomatic, while others may develop allergic disease, repeated sinopulmonary or gastroenterologic infections, and/or autoimmune disease. Individuals with complete absence of IgA (<5 mg/dL) may develop autoantibodies to IgA after blood or intravenous immunoglobulin infusions and may experience anaphylaxis on repeat exposure. Elevated serum IgA levels are associated with infection, inflammation, or IgA monoclonal gammopathy. Method In this nephelometric method, anti-human IgA binds to IgA in the patient sample, forming an insoluble complex. The amount of light scattered by this insoluble complex is proportional to the concentration of IgA present in the sample.   ********************************************************************
  • Upcoming Events

  • Blog Entries

  • Recent Status Updates

  • Who's Online (See full list)

  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
    • Most Online

    Newest Member