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Do I Have To Buy New Pots?


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#1 mrsfish_94

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Posted 10 April 2004 - 09:23 PM

I have read that I need to be careful of gluten residue, so does that mean I have to replace all my cookwear? Or will a good washing do? I know I will have to replace my toaster. I have also read that I should not bake gluten items in a bread maker and then use it for gluten-free baked goods. Does anyone have advise?

Also, does anyone recommend any specific brand of bread maker? What should I look for?

mrsfish
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Mrsfish_94
4 yr. old Daughter with peanut, dairy allergy & Dermatitis Herpetiformis (not formally diagnosed)
1 yr old Son with egg allergy

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#2 Cherbear

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Posted 12 April 2004 - 11:38 AM

Hi I was diagnosed two weeks ago and I had the same question. My sister-in-laws mom is celiac and has had it for many years. She told me to be sure and bleach my bread pan for my bread machine and any other pans I have used to cook or bake gluten containing foods. She recommended that I have separate pans for gluten-free baking and cooking. She also recommended using glass baking dishes. Cast iron must be replaced. She said as the food cooks it gets cooked into the pans and can cause contamination. Hope this helps.
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#3 gf4life

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Posted 12 April 2004 - 08:03 PM

Anything stainless steel or glass should be okay, as long as it is washed throughly and a dishwasher is good for this since it generally uses a much higher temp water than we can stand with sink washing.

Teflon and plastic utensils will absorb some of the gluten and then release the particles the next time you cook, so those need to be replaced and kept gluten free. I have different colored ones so my husband (who is not gluten-free) knows which ones are his and the strickly gluten-free pans are for me and the kids. Same with the cooking utensils. His are blue and mine are black. I also keep them separate when washing the dishes. His gluten dishes are washed first, then the water is changed in the sink and I wash my gluten-free dishes.

Cherbear is right about the cast iron, too. Same goes for stoneware bakeware.

It is not as bad as it seems. Just be patient with yourself. And before you replace your bread machine, try some recipes without one. Most gluten-free breads come out better when cooked in the oven. They are not like gluten breads that need a lot of kneeding and rising. They can usually be mixed by hand, set for one rising and then baked. Most machines don't have a setting for this and take much longer than it would take to do it the old fashioned way in the oven! :) Give it a try. You could use the money to buy more gluten-free foods, instead of a new machine.

God bless,
Mariann
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~West Coast-Central California~

Mariann, gluten intolerant and mother of 3 gluten intolerant children

#4 debmidge

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Posted 13 April 2004 - 02:10 AM

Hi All

The Breadman breadmachine (can run from $80-99 depending on store and sale) can be programed to mix, knead once and rise once. (Not all bread machines can be programmed like this. )Then you have to stop the machine before it begins the baking cycle. This is because the regular white bread setting doesn't bake at 375, it stops at 350 - (I use gluten free pantry bread mix & it calls for oven temp of 375). So, I stop the machine after the rise of the bread and then set machine on Bake Only at 375 for the 47 minutes it takes.

I like to use my bread machine because I do not have room in my kitchen for a Kitchen-Aid which everyone seems to like the best for mixing the gluten-free flours. I live in a tiny apartment and just about have room in my kitchen for my mixing bowls, etc. I keep the bread machine & use it in the living room. It makes a nice centerpiece! We are so cramped that we keep the extra baking supplies in the linen closet.

I also think that in Summertime, the small Breadman will not overheat my apartment like putting on the oven would. That's another problem as in summer my apartment gets very hot without the oven on. (I am on second floor).

Take care, Debbie 4/13/04
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Husband has Celiac Disease and
Husband misdiagnosed for 27 yrs -
The misdiagnosis was: IBS or colitis
Mis-diagnosed from 1977 to 2003 by various gastros including one of the largest,
most prestigious medical groups in northern NJ which constantly advertises themselves as
being the "best." This GI told him it was "all in his head."
Serious Depressive state ensued
Finally Diagnosed with celiac disease in 2003
Other food sensitivities: almost all fruits, vegetables, spices, eggs, nuts, yeast, fried foods, roughage, soy.
Needs to gain back at least 25 lbs. of the 40 lbs pounds he lost - lost a great amout of body fat and muscle
Developed neuropathy in 2005
Now has lymphadema 2006
It is my opinion that his subsequent disorders could have been avoided had he been diagnosed sooner by any of the dozen or so doctors he saw between 1977 to 2003

#5 ryebaby0

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Posted 15 April 2004 - 07:34 AM

Early on, when everything was so overwhelming, when I baked on cookie sheets I just used parchment paper and so when I was done, I could throw the paper away.
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Mom/wife to celiacs dx 12/03 and 12/04


Success is never final and failure never fatal. It's courage that counts -George Tilton

#6 gf4life

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Posted 15 April 2004 - 08:43 AM

Ryebaby, That is a good alternative, especially if you cannot afford to replace bakeware. Another thing is to line your cake pans with foil. This should keep the gluten particles from getting to the gluten-free foods.

God bless,
Mariann
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~West Coast-Central California~

Mariann, gluten intolerant and mother of 3 gluten intolerant children

#7 KAthyB

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Posted 18 April 2004 - 04:16 PM

I just wanted to say that I use one set of pots, pans, plastic spatulas etc. all in good condition for gluten-free and not gluten-free cooking and after 8 weeks on the gluten-free diet my daughters TTG went from very high positive to completely normal. I keep a separate counter for gluten-free food prep, also butter dish and toaster. I think if there was contamination the blood test would not have come out normal, would it? I do use my dishwasher for almost everything and keep a very clean kitchen.
Kathy
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#8 mrsfish_94

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Posted 19 April 2004 - 07:21 AM

Thank you everyone for the info! I was really worried about having to puchase new cookwear. I just purchase a good set ($$$) and did not want to throw them away. Thank you for the advise on bread making and makers. I am really not sure how to handle it in my house. My kitchen is small and almost no counter space. But I will figure it out. I will however get a new toaster and wooden mixing spoons. Thank you so much... again!!!! This web site is a God send!

Mrsfish
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Mrsfish_94
4 yr. old Daughter with peanut, dairy allergy & Dermatitis Herpetiformis (not formally diagnosed)
1 yr old Son with egg allergy


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