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Two mornings in a row I have gotten terrible stomach pains and watery diahrea within 30 minutes of eating 6 pieces of celery with a little Jif peanut butter on them. That is the only thing I had to eat on each day before this occurred. What's the deal? I thought peanut butter was ok. And I'm sure it can't be the celery, can it? Can I please get some advise from my experienced friends on this site. Thank you very much.

Jen

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Jen,

I don't know what caused it, but I've had the same thing. I had some Carl Buddig ham and then celery with some generic (cub foods) peanut butter. Another time, I had a can of fruit (small can), and some Honey Nut PB (Skippy) on a plain, salt-free rice cake and also had to hurry to the bathroom. With the ham, I also had stomach pains, as though I'd gotten into milk :(.

I, too, would appreciate knowing what's up with this!

-Kel

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If you have a problem with soy, then peanuts are a no-no. Peanuts and soy beans are related. Try eliminating the peanuts entirely.

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thank you. but i haven't had a prooblem with soy before. hmmm... how do i know? and also, is peanut butter considered dairy?

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Peanut butter is not dairy. Maybe whatever stage of healing your body is at is the real culprit. This could be a temporary sensitivity. I read somewhere that sometimes the roughage irritates the intestines during the healing process, so that could also be it.

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JEN,

Does anyone else in your house eat gluten? If so, does that peanut butter jar belong to YOU ONLY? If some regular bread crumbs happen to have gotten into the jar, that would cause you to react. Peanut butter, butter, jelly, mustard, mayonnaise...these are prime suspects for cross-contamination if there are gluten-eaters in the house. Just a thought, and I hope it helps!

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Jen,

Thinking about it around Christmas time I made some celery with cheese and mayo and I know everything I used was gluten-free and I had some terrible cramps, etc.. I am thinking it may have been the celery, maybe it's just harder for you to digest!?!?!?!? Not sure but I thought I would share my experience....

I hope you are feeling better :)

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Celery is one of the more difficult veggies to digest because of the cellulose (the stringy stuff) and I think maybe that if you are still in the recovery stage of the gluten-free diet, it may cause you some problems.

But I also agree with Sarah that it could be a cross contamination issue if you share the same peanut butter or even use the same utensils as a non gluten free roomate or spouse.

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Jen,

Don't know when you were diagnosed but if it was recent, you might want to just try cutting way back on anything high fat for a while... difficulty with nuts was something I had increasing problems with before going gluten-free (those pb+j sandwiches were sure making me ill) and I am just now (months later) able to eat a couple of nuts once every few days without getting queasy (same goes for other high fat foods). So my suggestion would be to take it slow and stay low fat for a bit.

Just a thought, Heather

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Thought you might like one more opinion. When I was diagnosed w/ celiac disease, I was having a very hard time with any of the hydrogenized oils. I still try to avoid them. They are in alot of the processed peanut butters to keep the elements from separating. I now buy the natural peanut butters and do not have a problem with them at all, although I do have to stir them up before I use them. :P

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