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Deadly Dairy?
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14 posts in this topic

This is a small article I found on ceilac.com about milk:

"Dietary Proteins in Human Milk"

"Proteins ingested by mother can appear in the breast milk. There is well known disease in breast fed babies called eosinophilic colitis, which causes eosinophilic infiltration in the large intestine of the babies and clinically presents as rectal bleeding. The therapy is very simple: the mother stops ingesting cow milk and cow milk products and the babies do not have bleeding and they are completely well. Based on this clinical syndrome, the same possibility exists for the presence of gluten peptides in Human milk. Studies on this have been done by Dr. Reichelt."

What about the possibility of gluten peptides in cow

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Since cows have four chambers in their stomachs, I'm betting that their digestive process would eliminate gluten from milk. However, I do know that if a milk cow eats onion plants, the milk will taste like onions. I also know that sometimes cows are put out to graze in harvested wheat fields. I don't know how common that practice is, though.

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Dessa,

I found this by searching celiac.com:

"AB- In two comparative groups of 50 children with cow milk proteins and 45 children with gluten intolerance retrospective analysis of initial symptoms was carried out. The initial symptoms of intolerance included: vomiting, loss of appetite, recurrent diarrhea, and weight gain disorders. These symptoms closely correlated with the type of nutrition (mixed, artificial) and the duration of exposition to harmful component of the food. The symptoms appeared within first days after birth with peak intensity in 6-8 weeks of life in the group with cow milk proteins intolerance. The symptoms of intolerance were most frequent in children of group II in 7-12 months of life. To prevent food intolerance in Polish children, it is recommended to feed them naturally as long as possible and to introduce flour and 4 basic grains late (after the 6th months of life)."

I

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If I am understanding that piece correctly, the intolerance to the milk proteins happened quickly, but the gluten needed time to do its damage. Maybe that is why not all of us have the diarrhea and so many cannot get positive biopsies: something has happened in their lives (in my case it was poverty!) to stop them from eating gluten for a while and thus slowing the damage. I wonder why the milk reactions happened so much faster.

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Dessa,

Not being a doctor, I'm not sure, but could it be the peptonized gluten proteins just get into the bloodstream faster in the number one study group?

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Does it account for children who have bottles supplemented in their diet? Or are they all exclusively breast fed?

I am convinced that the gluten gets through. I noticed a seriously marked change in my own son when I went gluten-free for two months. Now I went back on gluten after he was 6 months old and he seems ok with it now but it has not been introduced directly in his diet till just yesterday in the form of a teething biscut. We will see what results.

But man if the green colour from the spinach I eat gets through..

LOL

Denise

PS Its good to know someone has studied this at least all us mothers don't have any back up so far till now.

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Hi Denise,

The little article simply does not go into that kind of detail. The general Google searches I

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Thomas, When my problems with cow milk persisted, I tried to use goat milk and have had great success. Evidently, I am digesting the proteins in the goat milk, but cow milk does not digest properly. I don't have a clue as to why. But anytime I eat cereal or add creamer to my coffee and it isn't goat milk I get really sick. My cousin also has a problem with cow milk and my grandson. Shirley

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Shirley, I have a quick question for you. You said you have issues with milk, do you have issues with cheese? I am suspecting ( not conclusively yet) that I seem to have problems if I drink milk, and yet I can I have cheese everyday, and have not noticed a problem with that. Does that even make sense?

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Shirley,

I thought you might find this interesting about Redwood Hill Farm goat dairy:

"At this time Redwood Hill Farm products are not certified organic, but we are working towards that goal. The main stumbling block is that we cannot purchase all of the feed that the goats eat certified organic. The grain fed to animals is mostly grown in the midwest. Since we are a smaller, family farm we buy the grain from our feed mill. At this time they do not bring in organic feed and we are working with them with that goal in mind. We feed grain that is vegetarian and does not contain preservatives or other unnatural additives. 70% of the goats' diet is hay. We feed alfalfa hay and either bean or oat hay to give the goats variety. We can find some organic hay. Since goats are browsers (like deer) rather than grazers (like sheep or cows), our long term goal is to grow tree crops organically and harvest them for the goats to eat. We use no pesticide or insecticides on our farm and instead use traps and beneficial insects for fly control."

Maybe since the goats are "browsers," they do not eat the same things as cows.

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Thomas, ever since you posed this question I have been very curious to find some answers. I have been researching, and finally came up with something I found very intersting. It's not conclusive b/c it does not discuss the issues with gluten protiens in the milk, but it does seem as though gluten is a normal part of ingestion. Curious to see what you all might see in this.....

Feed Grains for Dairy Cattle

The major grains fed to dairy cattle in the U.S. are corn, sorghum, oats, wheat and barley. Research in the late 1960s indicated that all these grains supported the same level of milk production when fed in a pelleted grain mix. However, this research was conducted with a diet consisting of 55 percent alfalfa hay (dry basis) fed to cows past peak milk yield, with low feed intake. For today's high-producing herds, on-farm observations suggest that palatability of a grain mix is usually improved when no single grain makes up more than 80 percent of the concentrate mix

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AT LEAST, ONE THING IS GOOD WITH MILK, IT'S CALLED LACTOFERRIN

http://pubs.nrc-cnrc.gc.ca/sample/o01-212.pdf

http://www.lef.org/magazine/mag2000/oct200...actoferrin.html

I HAVE REALLY BIG PROBLEM WITH MILK. I DON'T KNOW IF ITS LACTOSE, OR THE FACT THAT THIS DRINK IS FULL OF PROTEIN. ALSO BOVINE MILK CAN CONTAIN LOTS OF GOOD BACTERIA IF YOU EAT YOGURT, BUT, UNFORTUNATELY, CAN CONTAIN E COLI TO.

I DECIDED TO EAT LITTLE GOAT YOGURT. THEY SAY IT'S RESTORE INTESTINAL FLORA. BUT ALSO BECAUSE OF LACTOFERRIN.

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