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Ny Time Article Dec 14
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First the article on Happyhappyhappy a few weeks ago, and now this- NYtimes is def doing their part to get the word out, at least on what kind of baked goods we can eat! :)

For Wheat Watchers, a Chance to Indulge

By CATHERINE SAINT LOUIS

DURING the holidays, a woman cannot live on poached pears alone - even if she is allergic to wheat.

It is not known precisely how many people have trouble with wheat because food allergies are often underdiagnosed. Three million Americans also are believed to have celiac disease, a hereditary intolerance to gluten, according to a 2003 study from the Center for Celiac Research in Baltimore.

Rebecca Reilly, the author of "Gluten-Free Baking" (Simon & Schuster, 2002), scours health food shops wherever she travels to find new products she can bring home to her gluten-intolerant children. "When you're told you can't have something, then it becomes the focus," said Ms. Reilly, a chef who teaches at Torte Knox, a cooking school in Hawley, Pa. "It's like the forbidden fruit."

A decade ago, bakers who wanted gluten- and wheat-free baked goods had to hunt down rice, potato and bean flours and concoct substitutes for wheat flour. Those efforts usually resulted in cakes and cookies that were either bland, brick-hard or crumbly (baked goods can fall apart without gluten, which is a protein in wheat that gives kneaded dough its elasticity).

Gluten-Free Pantry (gluten free.com) and Pamela's Products (pamelasproducts.com) have been the standouts with the wheat-free crowd for years and are widely available. But now they have competition from hundreds of companies that make wheat- or gluten-free baked goods that are as moist and flavorful as the real thing.

I've tested many of them and found several that deserve to be singled out. Chip Rosenberg and his wife, Patsy, who has food allergies, started Cherrybrook Kitchen less than a year ago. Now the company sells mixes for chocolate cakes and sugar cookies nationwide at stores like Whole Foods and SuperTarget. Their light, crisp sugar cookies are perfect as holiday gifts or to dip in hot chocolate (cherrybrookkitchen.com).

The chocolate chunk brownies from a mix from www.123glutenfree.com are moist but not too gooey.

Those who prefer to bake from scratch can adapt conventional recipes to be made with alternative flours, like Heron Foods's versatile Organic Bread and Cake mix, which made delicious cakes that reliably rose and also browned well (www.jollygrub.com/OnLineStore). And Bob's Red Mill's flour blend from garbanzo and fava beans makes delicious cakes, if a bit hearty (www.bobsredmill.com).

But it helps to understand the advantages and disadvantages of the many flours now available.

A good place to start is Bette Hagman's book "The Gluten-Free Gourmet Makes Dessert" (Henry Holt and Co., 2002).

The book is like a decoder ring, clarifying why some cakes don't rise and others are too bland. Using xanthan gum, she explains, can keep gluten-free cakes from crumbling. Rice flour tends to be drier than bean flours, so it helps to add a little more fat. Tapioca flour can lessen the grittiness of rice flours. To overcome the fact that many gluten-free flours have less protein than wheat flour does, protein can be added in the form of eggs, milk, buttermilk or unflavored gelatin.

Learning to bake without wheat and gluten is a bit like learning another language. There is a steep curve at first, but once you understand how the elements combine, you no longer need to think through each step.

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rock on! thnx stefi

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Double ditto :D

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Thanks Stef!!! I owe you an e-mail to schedule or GTG don't I. I'm gonna log onto my e-mail now and do that : )

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I have that cookbook mentioned (Gluten Free baking by R. Reilly) and love it!

Nice to see more recognition of Celiacs!!!!

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anytime guys!... i actually owe the thank you to my mom who excitedly called me this AM to tell me about it...I love how excited other people i know get lately when they see things about gluten or celiacs in the news!!! :D

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LOL!! I second that. I've had so many people send me that WSJ article from last week. It really makes you feel loved : )

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Yes, thanks for posting the information, I would have never known otherwise! All this recent publicity is great!

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    • This board is quite old but I'm hoping someone can continue on this topic. I am 61 years old and in all my life and doctors' visits, I have never had a western doctor ask me if I have a family history of celiac or suggest a gluten free diet. In all honesty, I have only started having what could be considered "gluten sensitive" symptoms within the past 2 years - chronic, unexplained bouts of diarrhea, mainly. Although bloodwork has shown in the past 2 years I now have high cholesterol, blood sugar, blood pressure and a bone density scan showed osteopenia. My PCP put me on meds for everything, of course. I recently began seeing a naturopath - and when I was running down my health history and list of symptoms she immediately asked about the family history of celiac. My father was positively diagnosed, through biopsy, with celiac sprue about 25 years ago, when nobody talked about gluten sensitivity. Anyway, she had me do the full panel testing at Enterolab. I have one celiac gene and a gene that indicates neurological manifestations of gluten sensitivity (I have long been plagued with panic attacks and depression). I also showed extremely high (215 units, below 10 is normal) for fecal anti-gliadin and varying high results for dairy, eggs and soy. My fat malabsorption stool test also tested high (431 units and normal is less than 300). The interpretation from Enterolab and my naturopath both strongly advised I eliminate gluten from my diet for the rest of my life. Naturopath said after a year or two I may be able to try introducing limited dairy, eggs and soy back; but not until the glutin response is completely under control. I am really struggling with this. Everyone I've talked to (including adult children, spouse, other family members, friends) is skeptical about me making such a radical change in my (our) diets based on these results. They seem to view gluten sensitivity as a "fad" and think I am going off the deep end. "Get a second opinion" - or "talk to your PCP about it". I've read enough to know that my PCP will not be of much help. And since I really only had one irritating symptom that could be related to gluten sensitivity, it's not like my life will be radically improved by going gluten free. I guess I could choose to ignore the test results - for now. I'm trying to view going gluten, dairy, egg and soy free as preventative and something that will contribute to a healthier life as I age. But it's so hard ... especially when the people who mean the most to me think I'm over-reacting and kind of cuckoo. Can anyone help me out here? I feel so alone ...  
    • Hello everybody, I'm new to the forum but am so happy to have found somewhere where people living with coeliac can share their thoughts! I've only been gluten-free for two weeks.  About three days in, I started experiencing awful heartburn which hasnt let up and I'm wondering if anyone else had this after giving up gluten? It wasn't a typical symptom for me before so feeling very uncomfortable.  I am not due to see my gastro consultant again until December and my GP (who was about as helpful as a chocolate teapot!) just gave me lansoprazole (its a PPI) which isnt even touching it.  Just wondering if giving up gluten is unmasking other symptoms or if this is a normal or common withdrawal effect?  I feel like burping/belching could help but its something I've never been able to physically do. Im in my early 30s so hoping its not another thing... Any advice would be appreciated A
    • O sorry. Negative biopsy. But this was months ago but i have no energy. My teeth are rotting i feel sick all the time. And i was told by someone who has celiac that it can also be difficult to have a diagnosis cause you would have to eat 6 pieces of bread for 6 weeks in order to get a proper diagnosis. And i just know that something is up
    • Susan Nash - this is interesting. Do you know anyone who has had success with supplements?  My doctor has just said to me that she has noticed a lot of celiac ladies have thinner hair in later life.  Obviously, that is just her observation. But I am going to ask for some vitamin and mineral testing so I can supplement any shortfall in case that is a problem.  I also am iron anemic which I'm sure isn't helping.   I have also read it is important that people who are worried about hair loss make sure they are eating enough protein.
    • Previous studies have indicated an increase in celiac disease rates in the United States, but these studies have been done on narrow populations, and did not produce results that are nationally representative. View the full article
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