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"help--holiday Horrors" (continued)


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20 replies to this topic

#16 coveowner

 
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Posted 28 January 2004 - 09:02 PM

Why shouldn't you have turkey and dressing? I make my own dressing using gluten-free corn meal and gluten-free flour mix to make the cornbread (with eggs, onion powder, soda, gluten-free baking powder and buttermilk. Then use the cornbread with chopped celery, chopped onions, eggs and broth to make the dressing. I used to add mushroom soup to my dressing but can't anymore (unless I make it myself) because bought soup has wheat flour in it.!!!!.

As the old saying goes, "there's more than one way to skin a cat"!!!!!! Hope no one's an offended catlover, Ha!!

Rose
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#17 Guest_shar4_*

 
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Posted 29 January 2004 - 09:44 AM

Hi All,

My husband is an avid Emeril Fan, and during the holidays, when I was at work he went online and found stuffing recipes that were gluten free. Very different from what I had always had, they were wild rice and mushrooms, instead of bread based, but it was wonderful, only 3 weeks into the gluten free thing, to be able to eat with the rest of the family.

I guess I'm an odd duck, because I refuse to see this as a disease, I look at it as an incovenience at times, but something I can deal with. To me, (I realize I'm probably certifiably nuts) disease implies illness, and since going gluten-free, I don't feel ill, the way that I used to.

Thanks for listening.

Sharon :D
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#18 seeking_wholeness

 
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Posted 29 January 2004 - 11:46 AM

Sharon,

You're not the only one who's certifiable, then, because I agree with you! I see celiac disease as a genetic DIFFERENCE that results in gluten simply not being FOOD for us. (And I don't know this for sure, but I would bet that there are other plants out there that are classified as "inedible" because they produce similarly toxic reactions--but in EVERYONE, not just a "strange" minority.) Unfortunately, we weren't taken into account when convenience foods were designed, but that does not make us DISEASED! We only get diseased when we persist in eating gluten in spite of the consequences.

I'm glad to hear that you enjoyed rice-based stuffing during the holidays. I've switched to rice stuffings/pilafs as well, and find them quite good (and also a good way to get me to eat brown rice, which I am reluctant to eat in other guises).

I hope you're doing well!
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Sarah
gluten-free since November 1, 2003

#19 judy04

 
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Posted 29 January 2004 - 09:48 PM

I just wanted to ask SARAH how she has learned so much in such a short period of time, I'm impressed! I too have been gluten-free since 11/03 and I'm still struggling along
with some sickness, however I did recently stopped all dairy and tomatoes, but I am feeling better than I was a year ago..I have been an RN all my life, but this has really thrown me,but, I am learning more every day,...judy
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judy


gluten-free since 11/03, neg biopsy, IGA elevated

#20 seeking_wholeness

 
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Posted 30 January 2004 - 09:36 AM

Judy,

I have always been fascinated by medicine, and I accumulate medical knowledge without really trying. When I was a small child, I would ask my mother to read to me from A Sigh of Relief, a kid-oriented, oversized first-aid book with large print and large illustrations for every step. (I still have the book, too!) I remember reading most often about choking (the Heimlich manuever), frostbite, fever, and pressure points for controlling bleeding. I never had to use my knowledge, but it was nice to have it! When I was a little older, I read the AMA's Family Medical Guide cover to cover, including parts that I wasn't emotionally ready to cope with yet (and unfortunately, my mother didn't know how to deal with my worries, so I ended up internalizing them until I was old enough to revisit them and work through them on my own). I find it interesting that one of the articles I returned to over and over was the one on celiac disease, even though I had only atypical symptoms that weren't even mentioned in the book!

After I graduated from college, I took a job as a medical abstractor for a health services research agency. I got to read about all sorts of medical devices (and, of course, I couldn't resist reading articles about everything else, as well!). At about the same time, I discovered the Blood Type Diet, which made perfect sense to me and opened my eyes to the validity of at least SOME alternative medicine. Then I had my two kids, who both had food sensitivities as infants, and got used to modifying my diet for their sake--and that's how I discovered that we all have celiac disease! Once I figured this out, I (predictably!) spent the next several days online, updating my knowledge about the condition. I have to say, I learned the most from the people right here on this board! (Thanks, everyone!)

Well, that's the long answer to your question. Now you can see my insanity in its full glory! I hope my accumulated knowledge is useful to you and others, and I hope you continue to learn and feel better each day!
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Sarah
gluten-free since November 1, 2003

#21 EmilyP2004

 
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Posted 14 February 2004 - 05:53 AM

Hi,
The holiday season definately poses challenges and at times I've definately felt alienated at times.  At several work events I've felt alienated by not being able to partipate in the cookies or meal.  I try to bring gluten-free cookies so I can eat when others are eating.  Filititi, don't feel bad about complaining here, I feel the same way often and it is nice to hear someone say it.  There is something very lonely about not eating when everyone else is.

For dealing with the holiday meals I asked ahead of time what the menu was and then prepared an alternative for every gluten containing item.  I was preparing and freezing food for several evenings ahead of time, but I definately appreciated having a delicious gluten-free alternative during the meals.  I felt less alienated than when I just made a gluten-free maindish for a previous event.  I also brought gluten-free cookies and other treats.  What are some ways that you guys deal being gluten-free at holiday or other gatherings?  I enjoy the new things I learn from people on this board.

About iron, it is possible to maintain one's iron levels and be a vegetarian and gluten-free.  I eat lots of high iron vegetarian foods--dried apricots, spinach, pumpkin seeds, almonds, flax, etc.  I'm not saying it is the only way to go, but it can work.  There are some awesome dietians/nutritionists out there who can help. 

Best Wishes!

‘About iron, it is possible to maintain one's iron levels and be a vegetarian and gluten-free. I eat lots of high iron vegetarian foods--dried apricots, spinach, pumpkin seeds, almonds, flax, etc‘.

*****************************************************************************

Yes, it is quite possible to be vegetarian & gluten-free.

You are eating good sources of iron- any dried fruit is excellent as is watercress, cocoa powder and even red wine - and remember Vitamin C helps the body absorb iron so citrus fruit or juice with veggie iron is recommended.

I was an ovo-lacto-vegetarian for many years before being diagnosed with celiac disease & saw no reason to stop my vegetarian diet after diagnosis since it covers all the required food groups.

I eat non-gluten grains, fruit and vegetables, organic milk & milk products and free-range eggs but no meat, no fish & obviously no gluten.

In fact, it was helpful being veggie and then coeliac since I was already used to checking ingredients .

If you still feel tired all the time after being diagnosed with celiac disease & going gluten-free you may need short-term prescription high-strength iron supplements from a doctor if you are low in iron.

This is because the coeliac condition means we do not absorb nutrients properly if we are eating gluten (the food is rushed through the digestive system as the body attempts to get rid of the ‘poison’ - with this rush some of the nutrients are lost).

Without strong prescription iron tablets on a GFD you will take a very long time to make up the missing iron.- whatever your diet.

By the time we are diagnosed with celiac disease some of the nutrient deficits can be huge & you may need other supplements - eg calcium - as well, to make up quickly the nutrients you lack.

So, see your family doctor is my advice & ask if you need blood test to check iron (also possibly Vitamin B & calcium, too).

At first I needed very strong prescription iron supplements from my GP (I’m in UK) for a while to make up my lack of iron but my dietitian says after 3 years gluten-free I now am very healthy & have a good vegetarian gluten-free diet covering all the necessary nutrients.

I feel great so obviously the gluten-free veggie diet works for me.
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