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Why Does The Dang Bread Fall After Coming Out Of Oven?


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21 replies to this topic

#1 jenvan

 
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    Lynne took this picture! :)

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Posted 24 January 2006 - 11:44 AM

Ah, so frustrated! I was a great baker pre gluten-free...Now, not too great on yeast breads etc. My dad is such a sweetie :) Great cook, trying to work out some new recipes on some of our old favs. He figured out gluten-free sweet rolls for Christmas and they were great. Now we are working on Dill Bread...or even a basic yeast bread recipe which we could convert to Dill. His problem and mine when baking is the same... The dough rises, but then post baking, falls. Why does that happen? He has been using Authentics flour mix but I have tried mixing my own...no difference. Anyone have any ideas? I would like to take pride in baked breads again ! Thanks, ya'll rock :)
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Jen
Indianapolis, IN

gluten-free since Feb 2005
dairy-free

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#2 jerseyangel

 
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Posted 24 January 2006 - 11:51 AM

Jen--a thought--would it help to bake at a lower temp. for a longer time? I know what you mean about being a good baker before gluten-free. Over the holidays, I felt like I had to learn all over again. Your Dad sounds great :)
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#3 hez

 
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Posted 24 January 2006 - 12:31 PM

Is that a sign that the bread rose too quickly leaving large air pockets?

Hez (who is not a good gluten-free baker, had lots of bad luck)
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#4 kabowman

 
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Posted 24 January 2006 - 01:00 PM

I remember my pre-gluten free baking bread - if it was too moist, it would fall in the center. I know my glutne free breads feel very dry when I mix it up but I use the candidia mix so no yeast and so it rises while cooking, not before.
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-Kate
gluten-free since July 2004

Other Intolerances:
Strawberries and Banannas (2007)
Nitrates (April 2006)
Yeast (which includes all vinegar so no condiments) (Oct. 2004)
Peanuts (Nov. 2004)
Soy (Oct. 2004)
Almonds (Sept. 2004)
Corn (Sept. 2004)
Lactose/Casein (1999)

#5 mommida

 
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Posted 24 January 2006 - 01:05 PM

I believe the answer is the mixture is too moist also. While you are still experimenting, try cooling the loaf on its side. It seems a little more appealing to eat.
L
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#6 lonewolf

 
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Posted 24 January 2006 - 10:28 PM

I just baked bread today and it didn't fall. I have had more bread baking disasters in the past 10 years than I want to admit, but I've learned quite a few things from all my mistakes.

Baking at a lower temperature for a longer time is very good advice. The "dough" has to be moist. It really is more like batter. This doesn't seem right if you're used to baking with "real" flour, but it will not work if it's too dry. This is where gluten-free baking radically differs. When I have tried making the bread dough feel like regular bread, it always falls. It goes into the loaf pan like quick bread and you'll think it won't work, but it does. Also, I've discovered that gluten-free yeast bread doesn't work without eggs, no matter what I try. (Bummer for me, since I shouldn't eat eggs, but I can manage one slice.)


Jen - have you tried the Gluten Free Pantry Country French Bread and Pizza Mix? I tried it last week for the first time and everyone loved it. I made it in a regular loaf pan in the oven. I'll bet you could toy around with it and convert it to dill bread.

Today I decided to try my own recipe, based on the ingredients in the mix and came up with a more grainy type bread. Here's what I did:

2 Cups Bette Hagman's all-purpose flour (I mixed this myself using br. rice flour)
1/4 C Montina Flour
1/2 C Bob's Red Mill gluten-free All Purpose Flour
1/2 C Tapioca Starch
3-1/2 tsp Xanthan gum

Mix flours together well, making sure xanthan gum is well-mixed.

2-1/2 tsp. Active Dry Yeast
1-3/4 C Warm water
1 tsp. Apple cider vinegar
1 Tbs. Honey
1 tsp. Salt

Dissolve the yeast in water, add vinegar, honey and salt. Let stand 5 minutes. Then add:

1/3 C Oil
2 Eggs, lightly beaten

Mix the liquid ingredients into the dry ingredients. It should be the consistency of a quick bread. Stir hard or use a mixer with dough setting for 2 minutes. Scrape into a greased 9 x 5 loaf pan. Let rise in a warm place for about 40 minutes or just until dough rises to the top of the pan. Bake at 350 for 40-45 minutes. It should be golden brown and hollow-sounding when tapped. Immediately turn out onto cooling rack.

My 10 year old son loved it and finally is not complaining about taking a gluten-free sandwich to school tomorrow. My younger son ate 2 pieces and asked for a third. I still think it's not as good as homemade wheat bread that I remember baking, but it's the best bread I've had for 10 years.

Good luck and happy baking! How sweet of your dad to bake with you! How's his psoriasis?

Liz
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Liz

Started Specific Carbohydrate Diet on 8-16-09 because son was diagnosed with Ulcerative Colitis and want to give him moral support.

Diagnosed with Minimal Change Nephrotic Syndrome in 2003. Discovered that going completely gluten-free put me in remission.

I would have despaired unless I had believed that I would see the goodness of the Lord in the land of the living. Psalms 27:13

#7 debmidge

 
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Posted 25 January 2006 - 02:32 AM

My loaves came out flat topped if I used too much water. Reduce liquid is my guess. I noticed that even an extra tablespoon or 2 of water made the bread flat.
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Husband misdiagnosed for 27 yrs -
The misdiagnosis was: IBS or colitis
Mis-diagnosed from 1977 to 2003 by various gastros including one of the largest,
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being the "best." This GI told him it was "all in his head."
Serious Depressive state ensued
Finally Diagnosed with celiac disease in 2003
Other food sensitivities: almost all fruits, vegetables, spices, eggs, nuts, yeast, fried foods, roughage, soy.
Needs to gain back at least 25 lbs. of the 40 lbs pounds he lost - lost a great amout of body fat and muscle
Developed neuropathy in 2005
Now has lymphadema 2006
It is my opinion that his subsequent disorders could have been avoided had he been diagnosed sooner by any of the dozen or so doctors he saw between 1977 to 2003

#8 chrissy

 
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Posted 25 January 2006 - 06:11 AM

jenvan---could you post your dad's sweet roll recipe?
christine
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Christine

15 year old twins with celiac, diagnosed dec. 2005
11 year old daughter with celiac diagnosed dec 2005
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#9 kabowman

 
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Posted 25 January 2006 - 06:41 AM

Ooops - you are right about the liquid in my loaf bread, it is pretty moist. I was thinking about my pizza dough which is dry.
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-Kate
gluten-free since July 2004

Other Intolerances:
Strawberries and Banannas (2007)
Nitrates (April 2006)
Yeast (which includes all vinegar so no condiments) (Oct. 2004)
Peanuts (Nov. 2004)
Soy (Oct. 2004)
Almonds (Sept. 2004)
Corn (Sept. 2004)
Lactose/Casein (1999)

#10 mommida

 
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Posted 25 January 2006 - 06:47 AM

I heard the rice flour cooks slower, so I definately agree with turning down the temp. and cooking longer.
I just switched to a pampered chef stone ware bread pan and it seems to be more to my liking. Crispy crust.
L.
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Michigan

#11 jenvan

 
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    Lynne took this picture! :)

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Posted 25 January 2006 - 09:34 AM

Hey all! Thanks for the input! I'm sending it on to my dad to see what happens.

Liz-I do have a bag of that mix at home, I need to try it! Hmmm...maybe tonight is the night? Thanks for asking about my dad. He is the same, I have been sending him multiple article, saying the gluten-free diet is worth a try, whether his biopsy came back negative or not. (He has not had antibody testing yet).

Christine-I will get his recipe and post. They were really good. I vaccum packed the leftovers and froze--so hopefully I can enjoy again!
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~~~~~~~
Jen
Indianapolis, IN

gluten-free since Feb 2005
dairy-free

#12 Cheri A

 
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Posted 28 January 2006 - 12:21 PM

Hi... this is my very first post on these boards, although I have been a lurker since Christmas time.
My dd is allergic to wheat and I have gotten LOTS of great info here.

I wanted to comment on the bread that I learned from an allergy board - and it seems to be true. For some reason, gluten-free bread doesn't seem to turn out as well in regular loaf pans, but will work in smaller pans.

I have had 2 successes with making bread and baking in muffin tins.. I have made Carol Fenster's banana bread and her sandwich bread (yeast added in). I just adjusted the times.

Due to her allergies, I also cannot use eggs so I sub 1 1/2T canola oil, 1 1/2T water and 1 tsp. baking powder mixed together for each egg needed.

Her website is www.savorypalate.com
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Mom of:
Carleigh~ 10 years old, allergic to wheat, milk, peanuts, strawberries, and many EAs. She is currently soy-light and egg-light ~ celiac testing inconclusive by allergist.
Gluten-Free since 10/05 She's a gymnast. : )

Nick ~ 13 years old with no known allergies.

#13 lonewolf

 
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Posted 29 January 2006 - 12:58 AM

Due to her allergies, I also cannot use eggs so I sub 1 1/2T canola oil, 1 1/2T water and 1 tsp. baking powder mixed together for each egg needed.


Can you get yeast breads to turn out well with the egg substitute? Quick breads always work out great, but I just can't seem to get yeast breads to work right. I laugh sometimes when I try a new type of gluten-free, dairy-free, soy-free, egg-free bread costing $5+ a loaf and it's worse than what I make myself. Apparently I'm not the only one who struggles with this. It's discouraging, because I've been getting great results with bread made with eggs (for my son).
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Liz

Started Specific Carbohydrate Diet on 8-16-09 because son was diagnosed with Ulcerative Colitis and want to give him moral support.

Diagnosed with Minimal Change Nephrotic Syndrome in 2003. Discovered that going completely gluten-free put me in remission.

I would have despaired unless I had believed that I would see the goodness of the Lord in the land of the living. Psalms 27:13

#14 Cheri A

 
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Posted 29 January 2006 - 08:08 AM

Liz,
The only yeast bread that I have had success w/is the Carol Fenster sandwich bread made as muffins so far. I have thrown out EVERY thing I've ever tried in a loaf pan though... then I read about the smaller pans working better. I have read every bread label in the store and she can't have any of them due to the additional allergies.

Today I am making my 3rd batch of that bread for her.
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Mom of:
Carleigh~ 10 years old, allergic to wheat, milk, peanuts, strawberries, and many EAs. She is currently soy-light and egg-light ~ celiac testing inconclusive by allergist.
Gluten-Free since 10/05 She's a gymnast. : )

Nick ~ 13 years old with no known allergies.

#15 lonewolf

 
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Posted 29 January 2006 - 01:42 PM

Liz,
I have read every bread label in the store and she can't have any of them due to the additional allergies.


Cheri,
I just read your whole signature. I can't imagine how hard it would be to cook and bake without rice. I can't have most of the same things your daughter is allergic to, so I know how hard it can be to bake. I have a recipe somewhere for cookies made with arrowroot flour. Would you be interested in the recipe? Also, have you looked into Chebe bread mix? It's all tapioca flour and there are directions for making it without eggs on their website. I haven't tried the mix, but I tried making it from scratch and it was at least edible. My boys loved them (they bake in muffin tins) and ate over half the batch between the two of them.
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Liz

Started Specific Carbohydrate Diet on 8-16-09 because son was diagnosed with Ulcerative Colitis and want to give him moral support.

Diagnosed with Minimal Change Nephrotic Syndrome in 2003. Discovered that going completely gluten-free put me in remission.

I would have despaired unless I had believed that I would see the goodness of the Lord in the land of the living. Psalms 27:13




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