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Why Does The Dang Bread Fall After Coming Out Of Oven?
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22 posts in this topic

Ah, so frustrated! I was a great baker pre gluten-free...Now, not too great on yeast breads etc. My dad is such a sweetie :) Great cook, trying to work out some new recipes on some of our old favs. He figured out gluten-free sweet rolls for Christmas and they were great. Now we are working on Dill Bread...or even a basic yeast bread recipe which we could convert to Dill. His problem and mine when baking is the same... The dough rises, but then post baking, falls. Why does that happen? He has been using Authentics flour mix but I have tried mixing my own...no difference. Anyone have any ideas? I would like to take pride in baked breads again ! Thanks, ya'll rock :)

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Jen--a thought--would it help to bake at a lower temp. for a longer time? I know what you mean about being a good baker before gluten-free. Over the holidays, I felt like I had to learn all over again. Your Dad sounds great :)

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Is that a sign that the bread rose too quickly leaving large air pockets?

Hez (who is not a good gluten-free baker, had lots of bad luck)

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I remember my pre-gluten free baking bread - if it was too moist, it would fall in the center. I know my glutne free breads feel very dry when I mix it up but I use the candidia mix so no yeast and so it rises while cooking, not before.

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I believe the answer is the mixture is too moist also. While you are still experimenting, try cooling the loaf on its side. It seems a little more appealing to eat.

L

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I just baked bread today and it didn't fall. I have had more bread baking disasters in the past 10 years than I want to admit, but I've learned quite a few things from all my mistakes.

Baking at a lower temperature for a longer time is very good advice. The "dough" has to be moist. It really is more like batter. This doesn't seem right if you're used to baking with "real" flour, but it will not work if it's too dry. This is where gluten-free baking radically differs. When I have tried making the bread dough feel like regular bread, it always falls. It goes into the loaf pan like quick bread and you'll think it won't work, but it does. Also, I've discovered that gluten-free yeast bread doesn't work without eggs, no matter what I try. (Bummer for me, since I shouldn't eat eggs, but I can manage one slice.)

Jen - have you tried the Gluten Free Pantry Country French Bread and Pizza Mix? I tried it last week for the first time and everyone loved it. I made it in a regular loaf pan in the oven. I'll bet you could toy around with it and convert it to dill bread.

Today I decided to try my own recipe, based on the ingredients in the mix and came up with a more grainy type bread. Here's what I did:

2 Cups Bette Hagman's all-purpose flour (I mixed this myself using br. rice flour)

1/4 C Montina Flour

1/2 C Bob's Red Mill gluten-free All Purpose Flour

1/2 C Tapioca Starch

3-1/2 tsp Xanthan gum

Mix flours together well, making sure xanthan gum is well-mixed.

2-1/2 tsp. Active Dry Yeast

1-3/4 C Warm water

1 tsp. Apple cider vinegar

1 Tbs. Honey

1 tsp. Salt

Dissolve the yeast in water, add vinegar, honey and salt. Let stand 5 minutes. Then add:

1/3 C Oil

2 Eggs, lightly beaten

Mix the liquid ingredients into the dry ingredients. It should be the consistency of a quick bread. Stir hard or use a mixer with dough setting for 2 minutes. Scrape into a greased 9 x 5 loaf pan. Let rise in a warm place for about 40 minutes or just until dough rises to the top of the pan. Bake at 350 for 40-45 minutes. It should be golden brown and hollow-sounding when tapped. Immediately turn out onto cooling rack.

My 10 year old son loved it and finally is not complaining about taking a gluten-free sandwich to school tomorrow. My younger son ate 2 pieces and asked for a third. I still think it's not as good as homemade wheat bread that I remember baking, but it's the best bread I've had for 10 years.

Good luck and happy baking! How sweet of your dad to bake with you! How's his psoriasis?

Liz

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My loaves came out flat topped if I used too much water. Reduce liquid is my guess. I noticed that even an extra tablespoon or 2 of water made the bread flat.

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jenvan---could you post your dad's sweet roll recipe?

christine

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Ooops - you are right about the liquid in my loaf bread, it is pretty moist. I was thinking about my pizza dough which is dry.

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I heard the rice flour cooks slower, so I definately agree with turning down the temp. and cooking longer.

I just switched to a pampered chef stone ware bread pan and it seems to be more to my liking. Crispy crust.

L.

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Hey all! Thanks for the input! I'm sending it on to my dad to see what happens.

Liz-I do have a bag of that mix at home, I need to try it! Hmmm...maybe tonight is the night? Thanks for asking about my dad. He is the same, I have been sending him multiple article, saying the gluten-free diet is worth a try, whether his biopsy came back negative or not. (He has not had antibody testing yet).

Christine-I will get his recipe and post. They were really good. I vaccum packed the leftovers and froze--so hopefully I can enjoy again!

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Hi... this is my very first post on these boards, although I have been a lurker since Christmas time.

My dd is allergic to wheat and I have gotten LOTS of great info here.

I wanted to comment on the bread that I learned from an allergy board - and it seems to be true. For some reason, gluten-free bread doesn't seem to turn out as well in regular loaf pans, but will work in smaller pans.

I have had 2 successes with making bread and baking in muffin tins.. I have made Carol Fenster's banana bread and her sandwich bread (yeast added in). I just adjusted the times.

Due to her allergies, I also cannot use eggs so I sub 1 1/2T canola oil, 1 1/2T water and 1 tsp. baking powder mixed together for each egg needed.

Her website is www.savorypalate.com

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Due to her allergies, I also cannot use eggs so I sub 1 1/2T canola oil, 1 1/2T water and 1 tsp. baking powder mixed together for each egg needed.

Can you get yeast breads to turn out well with the egg substitute? Quick breads always work out great, but I just can't seem to get yeast breads to work right. I laugh sometimes when I try a new type of gluten-free, dairy-free, soy-free, egg-free bread costing $5+ a loaf and it's worse than what I make myself. Apparently I'm not the only one who struggles with this. It's discouraging, because I've been getting great results with bread made with eggs (for my son).

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Liz,

The only yeast bread that I have had success w/is the Carol Fenster sandwich bread made as muffins so far. I have thrown out EVERY thing I've ever tried in a loaf pan though... then I read about the smaller pans working better. I have read every bread label in the store and she can't have any of them due to the additional allergies.

Today I am making my 3rd batch of that bread for her.

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Liz,

I have read every bread label in the store and she can't have any of them due to the additional allergies.

Cheri,

I just read your whole signature. I can't imagine how hard it would be to cook and bake without rice. I can't have most of the same things your daughter is allergic to, so I know how hard it can be to bake. I have a recipe somewhere for cookies made with arrowroot flour. Would you be interested in the recipe? Also, have you looked into Chebe bread mix? It's all tapioca flour and there are directions for making it without eggs on their website. I haven't tried the mix, but I tried making it from scratch and it was at least edible. My boys loved them (they bake in muffin tins) and ate over half the batch between the two of them.

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Liz ~

Thanks.. it's nice to run into someone that understands the additional stuff too!! I would *love* a tried and true recipe w/o those things!! I haven't baked w/arrowroot yet.

I read your signature too... have you tried any margarines? - we use Crystal Farms for Carleigh's butter and baking.

I got the MOST awesome sugar cookie recipe on here before the holidays.. it might have been you that posted it. I used a sorghum/tapioca/potato starch blend, subbed for eggs, subbed for milk w/potato milk and they were THE BEST. I should go find that thread and thank that person!

I think I have looked @ the Chebe bread mix and made it for her awhile ago. She hadn't gotten the "wheat taste" out of her mind so she didn't like it much then. I also wasn't avoiding rice then either since we hadn't gotten the blood testing back. I should try that again..

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I said I would post my dad's sweet roll recipe...he actually used this one below for it. It was good... Go here to see dough recipe: http://www.celiac.com/st_prod.html?p_prodid=931 and this for cinnamon/sweet roll: http://www.celiac.com/st_prod.html?p_prodi...-09106465894.3e

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Liz ~

Thanks.. it's nice to run into someone that understands the additional stuff too!! I would *love* a tried and true recipe w/o those things!! I haven't baked w/arrowroot yet.

I read your signature too... have you tried any margarines? - we use Crystal Farms for Carleigh's butter and baking.

Cheri,

I hope she can eat almonds. Here's the recipe. (BTW-2 of my kids liked them, 2 didn't, I thought they were okay.)

Almond Cookies

1-1/2 C Almonds

1/2 C Butter or Coconut oil (softened)

1 C Arrowroot

1/2 C Brown sugar

1/2 tsp Salt

1 tsp vanilla

1 tsp almond extract

18-20 whole almonds

Place almonds in food procesor and process until finely ground. Mix all ingredients in a food processor, process until well blended. Form dough into walnut-sized balls and place on greased cookie sheet. Press an almond into each. Bake at 300 for 17-20 minutes. After 5 minutes in the oven, press cookies down lightly with a fork. Let cool completely before removing from cookie sheet. Store tightly covered in refrigerator.

Here's another one from the same book. I haven't tried it yet.

Ginger Snaps

1-1/2 C Almonds

1/2 C Butter or Coconut oil (softened)

1 C Arrowroot

1/2 C Brown sugar (or Sucanat)

1 Tbs water

1-1/2 tsp ground ginger

1 tsp cinnamon

1/4 tsp nutmeg

1/4 tsp gr. cloves

1/2 tsp salt

Place almonds in food procesor and process until finely ground. Mix all ingredients in a food processor, process until well blended. Form dough into walnut-sized balls and place on greased cookie sheet. Bake at 300 for 17-20 minutes. After 5 minutes in the oven, press cookies down lightly with a fork. Let cool completely before removing from cookie sheet. Store in airtight container in refrigerator.

I haven't heard of Crystal Farms margarine. Where do you get it? I haven't found one yet without soy and I react worse to soy than to small amounts of butter. Coconut oil also works in some recipes.

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yum, think i'll try those almond cookies!

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I said I would post my dad's sweet roll recipe...he actually used this one below for it. It was good... Go here to see dough recipe: http://www.celiac.com/st_prod.html?p_prodid=931 and this for cinnamon/sweet roll: http://www.celiac.com/st_prod.html?p_prodi...-09106465894.3e

Jen... Thanks for Posting this Recipe here! I printed it off & would like to try it... I'm sure alot of the other folks would too~ Thanks much! :)

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Hi Liz ~ thanks for taking the time to type those out... they sound great and I'm sure others will love them too! Unfortunately, we avoid almonds on principal b/c of the peanut allergy it's too risky w/ x contamination and her #s are very high for it.

Jen ~ thanks for those links...I may play w/it too to see if I can get it to come out for my dd.

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let me know how it goes for you ladies if you try it. one catch...make them up close to serving time (not a day or two in advance). they do dry out sooner than regular rolls. but like i said, they tasted great and had good texture too.

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