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#16 neff_terence

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Posted 06 May 2004 - 09:48 AM

I wanted to add one more peice of information that I left out of my previous post/ short novel. I often see posts on this sight regarding depression. I can relate to where individuals are coming from. When I first developed the problem (3 yrs ago) I was going through serious issues in my personal life along with the gluten problem. There are a few things I want to point out that I think relate to the gluten free diet and overall well being.

1) If you have been recently diagnosed with the celiac disease and are just now trying to get on track, you have to take in to account the current condition of your body. You are probably malnourished and lacking many of the essential vitamens and minerals that allow your body and brain to function properly. Also, you are obviously experiencing terrible side effects from ingesting gluten. If you are feeling depressed, I stongly feel that there is a light at the end of the tunnel. Once I began to get my diet under control, things started to really brighten up. I became focused, energetic, and happy for the first time in years. This is due in large part to my body functioning properly which in essence effects everything you do. Give it some time. You will become a strong independent individual when you have control of your diet.

2) If your health condition permits, try to work out. Working out in combination with the proper gluten free diet will help revitalize your body. It will help bring the lacking nutrients to the appropriate malnurished sights and speed recovery. There are also scientific studies that prove that working out combats depression. I typically lift weights and jog about 4-5x a week. You don't have to kill yourself. Even if you jog or walk fast 3x a week you will notice results. I think the two most important keys to working out are consistency and determination. These are two words that you will become very familiar with when fighting your gluten problem.
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#17 neff_terence

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Posted 06 May 2004 - 10:30 AM

Richard,
You have a good point. In a lot of ways I think you have to fine tune your diet and find out what works best for you. My assumptions and opinions aren't based on any facts that I can substantiate without question, but my personal experience with these products.

Take care,
Terence
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#18 jaimek

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Posted 06 May 2004 - 11:46 AM

Neff- I have been gluten-free for about 3 months now and am still in and out of depression. Do you know how long it too you to realize there is a light at the end of the tunnel and you felt better emotionally? I also exercise 4-5 times a week. I would love to know when I am going to get out of this rut that I seem to be stuck in.
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#19 neff_terence

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Posted 09 May 2004 - 05:26 PM

Jaimek,
As I'm sure your aware, our bodies and circumstances are different. Therefore, to give you an accurate response would be a long shot at best. But to be completely honest, it took me 8-12 months to regain my balance so to speak. A large part of my recovery can be attributed to this website. I began visiting celiac.com around 2 months ago and have made substantial progress since. I have also made changes in my lifestyle to reflect more health concious behavior. For example, I put a lot of time into figuring out what foods I should consume for optimal living.
When I was depressed, I tried as much as possible to gravitate toward the things I enjoy. For me it is music, art, and architecture. You have to remain as persevering and optimistic as possible. When you do start to make a turn for the better, I think you will become a more poised and strong individual as a result of the experience.

Keep fighting,
Terence
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