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Traveling To France & Germany


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28 replies to this topic

#16 germanguy

 
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Posted 27 February 2006 - 04:56 PM

Hey there,

I am form Germany and I recommend the website of the 'German Celiac Society'!
http://www.dzg-online.de/ <-- click on the english button!!!

Those ppl are really nice and they can provide you with additional information!

If you have further specific questions you can also ask ME! ;)
Have fun in Germany and our beloved neighbor France! :D
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#17 tanyad

 
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Posted 01 March 2006 - 10:05 AM

Hey there,

I am form Germany and I recommend the website of the 'German Celiac Society'!
http://www.dzg-online.de/ <-- click on the english button!!!

Those ppl are really nice and they can provide you with additional information!

If you have further specific questions you can also ask ME! ;)
Have fun in Germany and our beloved neighbor France! :D



Hello German Guy-
Thank you. I have already contacted them. They seem very nice, but did not offer a lot of information.

Can I eat bratwurst while in Germany? Is it gluten free? I love it and eat here in the U.S.!! Could you tell me specific foods that I would find in Germany that are always safe? I have been told by a couple of people that eating gluten free in Germany will be tough... I will only be there for 3 days.

Any suggestions would be great! THANK YOU!
Tanya in Chicago
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#18 DonnaD

 
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Posted 01 March 2006 - 12:47 PM

I used the french version from

http://www.celiactra...rant-cards.html

2 weeks ago and they worked well. I printed out several and used them when necessary. I don't know how accurate the German ones are as we don't speak German, perhaps Ursula could comment?

Donna
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#19 germanguy

 
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Posted 01 March 2006 - 04:52 PM

Hey Tanya,

the german version from www.celicatravel.com/restaurant-cards.html is fine and should be helpful.

I am sorry, but I would not recommend Bratwurst. Eventhough there are gluten-free Bratwursts, I wouldn't eat it in a Restaurant. The Problem with Bratwursts is, that the spices and aromas used in it could be contaminated with gluten... the risk is just too high. :(

If you tell me the cities you will stay in, I can try to find restaurants with special gluten-free meals!

Safe, besides all of the basic things (like natural yoghurt, rice, potatoes, natural meet and so on) are also many kinds of german choclate (which by the way taste better than the american ones ;), and have saved my life a couple of times while travelling). There are also a places called 'Reformhaus' in almost any major city, which offer gluten-free products!

By the way, since November 2005 there is a new law in Germany (and France by the way, since this is a EU law) which forces every manufacturer of foods to declare any gluten containing ingredients on the package.
The problem is that you need to know the german and french names for all the crops containing gluten.

Greetings
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#20 Ursa Major

 
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Posted 01 March 2006 - 10:07 PM

I used the french version from

http://www.celiactra...rant-cards.html

2 weeks ago and they worked well. I printed out several and used them when necessary. I don't know how accurate the German ones are as we don't speak German, perhaps Ursula could comment?

Donna



I checked out the above mentioned German cards, and there is a serious typo in them, making them useless at this time. I contacted the people responsible for the site, and hope that they'll correct it very quickly. The cards state that you have a 'Lutenunvertraeglichkeit' instead of 'Glutenunvertraeglichkeit'. Easy to correct, but you really can't print them out as is right now.

The above mentioned cards list the names of all the crops containing gluten. They are Roggen (rye), Weizen (wheat) Gerste (barley), Hafer (oats). I don't know what triticale is in German.

The problem with the new law is, that Germans don't believe that wheat germ oil and wheat starch contain gluten, even though they appear to make extra sensitive people sick. I've found that the people in one forum are adamant that I am wrong, and that the people who claim that these items are a problem must have issues with other things, and might not even be celiacs. I take exception to that myself.
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I am a German citizen, married to a Canadian 29 years, four daughters, one son, seven granddaughters and four grandsons, with one more grandchild on the way in July 2009.

Intolerant to all lectins (including gluten), nightshades (potatoes, tomatoes, peppers, eggplant) and salicylates.

Asperger Syndrome, Tourette Syndrome, Addison's disease (adrenal insufficiency), hypothyroidism, fatigue syndrome, asthma

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#21 germanguy

 
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Posted 02 March 2006 - 05:03 AM

Ursula you are right. The 'G' in Glutenunverträglichkeit is missing, though gluten is written correctly in the following passage!

The german and the english word 'triticale' are the same! At least that's what wikipedia.de is saying! ;)

a little OFF TOPIC:
Regarding the new law, starch derived from wheat has to be declared (for example: Stärke[Weizen])!
Also every possible trace of wheat due to cross contamination during the production process has to be declared (for example: Spuren: Weizen)!

So in my oppinion the law is actually a good thing which makes celiac living safer! :P
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#22 aikiducky

 
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Posted 02 March 2006 - 05:36 AM

The only problems with the new law are glucose syrup (which can be from wheat, and doesn't have to be declared, and maltodextrin (ditto, AFAIK). So if you look at a package, and the food doesn't list wheat, rye or barley as allergens, and doesn't contain glucose syrup, you can assume it's safe. I've had no problems with shopping so far with the new labelling laws at least. If you're not supersensitive, the glucose syrup might not even give you symptoms - since it's only for a short holiday...?

So basically, if you know what wheat, barley and rye are in german & french, shopping at supermarkets shoudn't be too difficult. After all you're used to reading labels already. ;)

Pauliina
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#23 Ursa Major

 
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Posted 02 March 2006 - 05:48 PM

Ursula you are right. The 'G' in Glutenunverträglichkeit is missing, though gluten is written correctly in the following passage!

The german and the english word 'triticale' are the same! At least that's what wikipedia.de is saying! ;)

a little OFF TOPIC:
Regarding the new law, starch derived from wheat has to be declared (for example: Stärke[Weizen])!
Also every possible trace of wheat due to cross contamination during the production process has to be declared (for example: Spuren: Weizen)!

So in my oppinion the law is actually a good thing which makes celiac living safer! :P


Okay, since I haven't actually lived in Germany for 27 years, and haven't been back since being diagnosed with Celiac disease, my knowledge is hearsay, while yours is firsthand. And what you're saying makes me feel better, because it is definitely good that wheat starch has to be listed, as well as possible cross contamination. That way people can make up their own mind if they want to take the risk.

And Pauliina, it is good to know what to look out for, as I guess there are pitfall in every law. As long as Celiacs know that those things aren't safe, they can watch out for them. I just wished all people with Celiac disease would do their own research instead of the info they get from their doctor, which is usually very little.

My second oldest daughter's mother-in-law has Celiac disease as well (so, their children have a very high chance of getting it, since it comes from both sides). But she will eat cake or other things containing gluten sometimes as a treat, thinking it will do no harm. Before I knew I had celiac disease, I'd bake a cake with different kinds of flour (oat, buckwheat, millet, rye, and some whole wheat flour), and she would eat it, thinking that 'just a little wheat' wouldn't hurt her. It never sounded right to me, but I didn't know anything about the subject. Now I know that she is harming herself.

When she heard I have celiac disease as well, she sent me an e-mail, letting me know that she'd be there if I needed advice. By then I knew more about it than she had learned in years (she knows how to use e-mail, but I think that's pretty much all she uses the Internet for). How can I tell her that her advice is useless to me, if she doesn't know that cheating is not an option? I don't want to make her feel bad.
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I am a German citizen, married to a Canadian 29 years, four daughters, one son, seven granddaughters and four grandsons, with one more grandchild on the way in July 2009.

Intolerant to all lectins (including gluten), nightshades (potatoes, tomatoes, peppers, eggplant) and salicylates.

Asperger Syndrome, Tourette Syndrome, Addison's disease (adrenal insufficiency), hypothyroidism, fatigue syndrome, asthma

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#24 tanyad

 
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Posted 07 March 2006 - 02:23 PM

Hey Tanya,

the german version from www.celicatravel.com/restaurant-cards.html is fine and should be helpful.

I am sorry, but I would not recommend Bratwurst. Eventhough there are gluten-free Bratwursts, I wouldn't eat it in a Restaurant. The Problem with Bratwursts is, that the spices and aromas used in it could be contaminated with gluten... the risk is just too high. :(

If you tell me the cities you will stay in, I can try to find restaurants with special gluten-free meals!

Safe, besides all of the basic things (like natural yoghurt, rice, potatoes, natural meet and so on) are also many kinds of german choclate (which by the way taste better than the american ones ;), and have saved my life a couple of times while travelling). There are also a places called 'Reformhaus' in almost any major city, which offer gluten-free products!

By the way, since November 2005 there is a new law in Germany (and France by the way, since this is a EU law) which forces every manufacturer of foods to declare any gluten containing ingredients on the package.
The problem is that you need to know the german and french names for all the crops containing gluten.

Greetings


Thanks again...
The plan keeps changing but the latest is that we will be staying possibly in Bingen and Cologne (Koln) and we may spend a few hours in Koblenz and Mannheim... and not necessarily in that order!

If you have restaurant suggestions or stores (like the reformous-health stores)... I would be all ears!
Tanya in Chicago
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#25 jgoings

 
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Posted 07 March 2006 - 04:29 PM

I just got back from a trip to Germany. My advice for the in-flight meal is to request gluten free, but take your own food just in case. The meal I got from Northwest included crackers?!?! and some very nasty looking terrine. The fish and rice were fine, if incredibly dry.

In Germany I searched out the "Bio" section in the regular grocery store - it's green and pretty easy to find. I got a few staples there to keep me going. Be careful with tortilla chips in the regular snack aisle - all the ones I found contained wheat. I'm pretty sure with my almost non-existent German I was getting glutened in restaurants - either that or I picked up a traveler's bug.

I had only been diagnosed for about a week before the trip, so my gluten-detection skills are still developing! I may be moving there, though, so either my German or my gluten finding will improve - hopefully both.

Good luck!


Janet
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#26 NicoleAJ

 
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Posted 12 April 2006 - 05:14 PM

I found this link, which I think is really helpful--its just like our lists of foods we can eat and cannot eat, except its in french, so if you see the forbidden things (in the right column) on menus or product labels, then you'll know to steer clear of them.

http://www.maladieco.../rsgregime3.htm

I'm going to Paris next month, so if anyone sees any good info that's not already listed on the boards, please let me know.
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#27 NicoleAJ

 
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Posted 12 April 2006 - 05:27 PM

Also, my French is pretty bad so I had some difficulty finding it again, but here are some stores in France that sell gluten free products.

http://www.maladieco...rsgacheter3.htm
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#28 twinkle-toez

 
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Posted 10 July 2012 - 10:48 AM

I don't mean to butt into a conversation, but I just wanted to clarify...

What makes bratwurst potentially unsafe to eat in a restaurant is the spices in it? So the actual inside is completely meat and no gluten filler?

I too am going to be backpacking through berlin for a couple of days and am a celiac with very limited german skills (introductory german from about 8 years ago).

So far I've read that currywurst should be okay, and now have your recommendation of German chocolate. I REALY want to try traditional german foods while in Germany... But I don't want to be ill, especially while traveling...

Any suggestions on 'traditional' dishes (other than currywurst, pork knuckle, chocolate)...

Thank you!!!! (Danke)
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#29 lovegrov

 
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Posted 10 July 2012 - 11:03 AM

Twinkle, please be aware that anything you've read in this thread is now 6 years old. You might want to start a new thread.

richard
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