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Vinegar?
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I seem to react to vinegar, almost every time, and strongly. Could this be a gluten reaction?

I also seem to react to alchohol made from grain and rice dream milk.

Just wondering if is just a sensitivity to vinegar or if I am actually damaging myself.

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P.S - I know malt vinegar is bad news - I'm talking about when it just says plain 'ol vinegar on the label.

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Julie--Rice Dream contains gluten. I believe it's from barley used in the production. I know most, but not all vinegars are ok, gluten wise. Malt and apple cider FLAVORED being the exceptions. I use apple cider vinegar with no problems. Could it be the acid you react to?

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Yeah, It could very likely be the acid. I mentioned Rice Dream because I have read that they believe the distilling process gets out the barley, but that it has been found at .002% I think in some samples. So I guess I am skeptical of the idea that the distillation process in any case can actually remove all gluten.

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Julie-It seems from my reading on this board, there are a "select" bunch :D of Celiacs who cannot tolerate distilled alcohols and vinegars. Most people can. However, some vinegars are not made from wheat---I'm pretty sure Heinz vinegar is made from corn?

I just looked it up on the Heinz page:

Heinz Ketchup does not contain any gluten (the distilled vinegar used is from corn sources). Also, Wine Vinegar, Distilled White Vinegar and Apple Cider Vinegar are gluten-free. Please note that Heinz Organic Ketchup and Apple Cider Flavored Vinegar are not gluten-free.

So, it might be the type/source of vinegar you are using, or a non-gluten related issue? Those are my two conclusions.

Hope you figure it out, girl!

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I cannot tolerate any vinegar, even rice vinegar (I made my own mayo and mustard trying to find a way around my problems and that didn't help either), and I cannot tolerate any grain alchohls.

My problem is yeast though, I think. There is yeast in the vinegar process - I read that in one of my many early searches - on a candida site. I am guessing, that is the problem with the alchohl too. I can have tequilla which is not made from grain and potato vodka, in small amounts.

I know I cannot have yeast, not even ripe fruit - same reaction as wine and vinegar. The last time I had a yeast bread, I passed out for 4 hours and was groggy for days - in addition to the tummy problems.

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Gasp - Yes! When I have one too many cherries or blueberries I get stomach cramps and run to the BR. Cherries are the worst though for me. Probably over 5 and I am done for.

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Rice Dream milk does have barley or malt in it although it is not on the package. I suggest going to their website as they list each item and what it

contains.

http://www.imaginefoods.com/

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If you're reacting to all distilled vinegars or "vinegar," then it's not gluten. Very, very, very, very few vinegars are made from wheat.

richard

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I agree with Richard. I thought vinegars were made without gluten -- I was under the impression that the only ones which were questionable were "Malt Vinegar" (obviously) and "Balsalmic Vinegar". . . . Lynne

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I agree with Richard. I thought vinegars were made without gluten -- I was under the impression that the only ones which were questionable were "Malt Vinegar" (obviously) and "Balsalmic Vinegar". . . . Lynne

balsamic vinegar is only questionable if it's not real balsamic and has added ingredients. balsamic vinegar is made like grapes, in a process very similar to wine making. it doesn't come from a grain.

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Thanks for the heads up on that . . . I didn't know that! I love Balsamic vinegar, too -- you've made me really happy! :) . . . Lynne

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Heinz apple cider vinegar is not gluten-free according to their website. I have found many vinegars that are not really gluten-free so make sure you hit the corporate websites prior to using vinegars. I havent found a apple cider vinegar yet that was gluten-free in the standard store.

Deborah

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Heinz apple cider vinegar IS gluten-free -- it's the apple cider FLAVORED vinegar that isn't gluten-free. There'sa big difference; the flavored vinegar isn't really made with apple cider. Real apple cider vinegar is without exception gluten-free, even in the standard store. I've never found one that isn't gluten-free. If you have found real apple cider vinegars that aren't gluten-free please tell us which ones.

richard

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Heinz apple cider vinegar is not gluten-free according to their website. I have found many vinegars that are not really gluten-free so make sure you hit the corporate websites prior to using vinegars. I havent found a apple cider vinegar yet that was gluten-free in the standard store.

Deborah

FWIW, I recently read some info concerning vinegar. Just did a search and found the Web site that published the info: http://www.nowheat.com/grfx/nowheat/primer/iheard.htm

"In the United States, almost all distilled vinegar comes from corn, not wheat. In the rare instances where wheat is the original source of the distilled alcohol that gets fermented into vinegar, the distillation process will remove all appreciable amounts of gluten (gliaden, peptide chains). A "mother" is added to the distilled alcohol to begin the process of fermentation, but research and interviews with industry experts (including the provider of vinegar to Heinz) indicate that gluten-containing ingredients are not used in this "mother" -- so distilled vinegar is safe. Please note that most vinegar listed on ingredients list is not distilled vinegar."

"If food manufactured in the United States has vinegar listed as an ingredient, where just the word "vinegar" appears between commas (for example, "Ingredients: water, vinegar, tomato paste)" the FDA's Compliance Policy Guide for Vinegar requires that the vinegar must be apple cider vinegar. So if you see just "vinegar" listed as an ingredient (not "malt vinegar" or any other modification), the vinegar is apple cider vinegar."

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Now THAT is good know. I have never liked apples - perhaps they are my problem. Strange thing is that like baked apples and applesauce. But usually apple juice makes me feel a little unhappy, and I hate apples raw. Good to know it is not gluten though. As long as there is no damage occuring, I can deal.

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I seem to react to vinegar, almost every time, and strongly. Could this be a gluten reaction?

I also seem to react to alchohol made from grain and rice dream milk.

Just wondering if is just a sensitivity to vinegar or if I am actually damaging myself.

trust your body!

:)

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No matter what your friend told you, if the grain vinegar is made from something other than wheat (almost no distilled vinegar is made from wheat), there is absolutely no way there can be gluten in it. You might react to it in some fashion but it is NOT a gluten reaction because there is no gluten. Take Heinz white or distilled vinegar for instance. It's made from corn (which, by the way, is a grain). There's no wheat, rye, barley or oats anywhere in the process. Your body might not like the vinegar but whatever is happening, it's NOT because of gluten.

The same is true with some alcohols. Smirnoff vodka is made from corn. No wheat, rye, barley or oats. So if you react to Smirnoff, it's most definitely not because of gluten.

If you've decided not to eat anything at all with vinegar in it, that's your choice, but it most certainly is not a gluten issue. I don't know of a single mayo, ketchup or mustard made with vinegar from wheat.

I'm not saying you don't react in some way and I'm not saying that others don't have trouble with some distilled products, but please, please don't confuse people by telling them that all grain vinegars and alcohols have or could have gluten. It's simply not true.

richard

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No matter what your friend told you, if the grain vinegar is made from something other than wheat (almost no distilled vinegar is made from wheat), there is absolutely no way there can be gluten in it. You might react to it in some fashion but it is NOT a gluten reaction because there is no gluten. Take Heinz white or distilled vinegar for instance. It's made from corn (which, by the way, is a grain). There's no wheat, rye, barley or oats anywhere in the process. Your body might not like the vinegar but whatever is happening, it's NOT because of gluten.

The same is true with some alcohols. Smirnoff vodka is made from corn. No wheat, rye, barley or oats. So if you react to Smirnoff, it's most definitely not because of gluten.

If you've decided not to eat anything at all with vinegar in it, that's your choice, but it most certainly is not a gluten issue. I don't know of a single mayo, ketchup or mustard made with vinegar from wheat.

I'm not saying you don't react in some way and I'm not saying that others don't have trouble with some distilled products, but please, please don't confuse people by telling them that all grain vinegars and alcohols have or could have gluten. It's simply not true.

richard

dear richard,

thanks for the info.

i'll pull my comments re: vinegar and liquor until i get some more definitive info.

thanks!

paula

:)

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The same is true with some alcohols. Smirnoff vodka is made from corn. No wheat, rye, barley or oats. So if you react to Smirnoff, it's most definitely not because of gluten.

I couldn't find any info on Smirnoff's site re: their ingredients. But on Stoli's site they had this under "ingredients":

"Historically, vodka has been made from whtaever agricultural crop is most abundant and cheap, but modern vodka is made principally from various grains, most often corn, rye, and wheat. Rye is common in eastern European vodkas whereas most western vodkas are produced from wheat."

Yes, corn is a grain, but if "grain alcohol" could mean corn, rye, or wheat (but most commonly wheat), I'm not taking chances, I have had bad reactions to grain vodkas.

Richard, do you have definitive info that Smirnoff *only* uses corn? I'd love to add it to the list of OK vodkas, especially since bars tend to carry it.

[other OK vodkas: Lukosawa (inexpensive Polish potato vodka), Chopin (expensive Polish potato vodka), and Ciroq (French vodka from grapes).]

:)

paula

ps - maybe there is some labelling standard for "grain" in regard to alcohol? there was one weird vodka I saw once, can't remember the name, but it said on it that it was a "corn" liquor. this kind of confusion is what has me reluctant to trust the vagueness of the vinegar labels...

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I just found out from the Heinz website that it is flavored apple cider vinegar that has gluten. However, the site says that its white vinegar and regular apple cider vinegar, which aren't flavored, are gluten free. Hope this helps.

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I cannot tolerate any vinegar, even rice vinegar (I made my own mayo and mustard trying to find a way around my problems and that didn't help either), and I cannot tolerate any grain alchohls.

My problem is yeast though, I think. There is yeast in the vinegar process - I read that in one of my many early searches - on a candida site. I am guessing, that is the problem with the alchohl too. I can have tequilla which is not made from grain and potato vodka, in small amounts.

I know I cannot have yeast, not even ripe fruit - same reaction as wine and vinegar. The last time I had a yeast bread, I passed out for 4 hours and was groggy for days - in addition to the tummy problems.

Interesting! if you don't mind me asking how did you find out you had an issue with yeast?

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This topic is more than six years old. Most of the participants are no longer active. kabowman was last in in 2009.

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This topic is more than six years old. Most of the participants are no longer active. kabowman was last in in 2009.

Thanks. I figured I wasn't going to get a response.

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