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Hair Dye Products
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26 posts in this topic

Hello to everyone. It is so wonderful to have this format to share important information collectively.

I am surprised at how many Celiacs are not concerned about gluten contact on your skin. Our skin absorbs whatever sits on it (within reason) which is why many medication are given topically.

I am very gluten sensitive so perhaps that is why I have had to learn to be so very cautious. When I was relatively new at this, I dyed my hair at home without giving it a second thought. Because I had been gluten free for a couple if years, I had an awful reaction to the gluten containing hair product that I used. I sat there for 40 minutes with wheat protein sitting on my scalp. About a week later, my head itched like I had ants biting me. I had no skin sores at all, just itching. Within a month, I developed a rash down my back that scanned over like chicken pox. It took months for it to go away. However, the worst part was it threw my body into an autoimmune response. My lymph nodes ached, arthritis flared, systemic yeast was relentless, fatigue, depression and irritability was back. It took almost 6 months to get my body back to feeling healthy again.

You never know what can cause you to become really ill or have a serious reaction. Gluten shut my pituitary gland down. It is nothing to play with or take lightly.

I have a no gluten policy because I must in order to feel healthy. We all know what a pain it can be and also the extra expense. But having had 6 months of feeling as ill as I had while on gluten, I learned my lesson hard.

Nothing touches my body unless I am certain it is gluten free. This even includes laundry soap. It is not worth it. Gluten can shut your adrenal glands down and can wreck your immune system and cause chronic depression and cancer. We all need to be careful...always.

It is good to see (from reading the threads) that there are some gluten free hair dyes out there. I also like to make a quick call to the manufacturer to make certain the information is current. I keep a list on my phone of what I CAN have. If it is not on the list, it doesn't belong in me.

I hope all of you that are new to this will realize that your skin will absorb gluten. Be careful with your bodies. We only get one..

Blessings to all and thank you for all if the wonderful info I have gathered from this site.

Katy

Gluten is too big to be absorbed through the skin. The medications that are absorbed are specially made to be small enough and have special additives that allow them to pass through to the blood stream. Gluten must be in the intestines to cause us to make the antibodies that cause damage.

http://www.cureceliacdisease.org/archives/faq/what-ingredients-should-i-avoid-in-cosmetic-products

"What ingredients should I avoid in cosmetic products?

Gluten is only toxic to celiac patients and patients with dermatitis herpetiformis (DH) if ingested. Because gluten cannot be absorbed through the skin, the use of cosmetic and shampoos containing gluten has not been shown to be detrimental to patients with celiac disease or DH. However, we do recommend gluten-free lip products, hand lotions and other products that may end up near the mouth. And, in the case of children, a gluten-free shampoo would be wise."

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