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Hair Dye Products


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#16 ravenwoodglass

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Posted 10 July 2006 - 07:05 AM

The henna reacts with the metallic dyes to form new and stunning colors, like deep blue-green.

And it can't be filxed, you have to grow it out.



I might have liked that in my younger days. <_< :D Thanks for letting us know what happens I always wondered.

I am wondering about hair products because I have had a ton of hair loss over the past couple of years and believe it is related to malnutrition- I have been gluten free for a couple of months and it seems like I am not losing as much hair but am wondering if I should also change my hair care products and stop highlighting my hair. Does anyone know the mechanism for hairloss in celiac?


I believe it is associated with the autoimmune action that the gluten causes. I used to think it was from malnutrition but even a minor glutening will case me to loose hair for a couple of weeks and my DH will get alopecia or circular clumps of hair loss from even a small amount. I up my B vitamins when this occurs but don't know if it really helps or if just time gluten-free does.
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Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying
"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)


celiac 49 years - Misdiagnosed for 45
Blood tested and repeatedly negative
Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002
Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis
All bold resoved or went into remission with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002
Some residual nerve damage remains as of 2006- this has continued to resolve after eliminating soy in 2007

Mother died of celiac related cancer at 56
Twin brother died as a result of autoimmune liver destruction at age 15

Children 2 with Ulcers, GERD, Depression, , 1 with DH, 1 with severe growth stunting (male adult 5 feet)both finally diagnosed Celiac through blood testing and 1 with endo 6 months after Mom


Positive to Soy and Casien also Aug 2007

Gluten Sensitivity Gene Test Aug 2007
HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

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#17 danalolly

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Posted 03 December 2012 - 08:50 AM

I was diagnosed two years ago with celiac. I have been dying my hair for years. I have really been having terrible skin issues in the past 6 months, very oitchy skin, eveywhere, open sores on scalp. i found out my hair products had gluten. I was tested for DH and i do not have.
the gluten is affecting me topically s i went all gluten-free with all skin care. It has only beed 3 days but I am seeing quick results.
I need to dye my hair, and i am nervous
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#18 kareng

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Posted 03 December 2012 - 09:03 AM

I was diagnosed two years ago with celiac. I have been dying my hair for years. I have really been having terrible skin issues in the past 6 months, very oitchy skin, eveywhere, open sores on scalp. i found out my hair products had gluten. I was tested for DH and i do not have.
the gluten is affecting me topically s i went all gluten-free with all skin care. It has only beed 3 days but I am seeing quick results.
I need to dye my hair, and i am nervous


Just to let you know - all the posts on this thread are over 6 years old. Any product information should be double checked. Many products may have changed ingredients in that ampount of time.
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#19 Gemini

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Posted 03 December 2012 - 11:16 AM

What happens if someone with celiac uses hair dye/shampoos/conditioners with gluten? I have been gluten free for a few months but haven't altered my hair regimen.


Nothing....unless you have an additional allergy to wheat/gluten and it causes a topical reaction. Topical reactions from hair dye are from contact allergies, not a celiac response.
Even if you did ingest some hair dye, you would have more to worry about than a Celiac reaction....hair dye should never, ever be ingested! Since hair dye is rinsed very well after application and the hair is usually washed twice, there will not be any left in the hair afterwards. There shouldn't be or irritation could happen.

I am a very sensitive Celiac, have been coloring my hair for 25 years and never have had a problem. I do not have topical allergies, though.
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#20 Alwayssomething

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Posted 03 December 2012 - 11:58 AM

Dermatitis herpetiformis (DH) is not a skin allergy. Rather, DH is a chronic, extremely itchy rash consisting of papules and vesicles. Although it is often confused with skin allergies, it is actually associated with Celiac Disease (celiac disease), a sensitivity of the intestine to gluten foods in the diet. celiac disease is also not a foold allergy, but rather a disease of the intestines.

This was taken directly from the Asthma and Allergy Foundations webpage and is the same answer I reiceived when I went to the dermatologist for my DH. If you are having a skin reaction to Gluten, it is possible it is an allergy, but if it is blistery and itchey and confirmed to be DH then it is not an allergy it is a reaction to the gluten and you must eliminate it not only in your diet but in your topicial products as well. I wish it was an allergy, then I could just pop a Claritin or Zyrtec or one of those other fancy allergies meds and get on with my day.

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#21 ravenwoodglass

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Posted 03 December 2012 - 12:08 PM

I was diagnosed two years ago with celiac. I have been dying my hair for years. I have really been having terrible skin issues in the past 6 months, very oitchy skin, eveywhere, open sores on scalp. i found out my hair products had gluten. I was tested for DH and i do not have.
the gluten is affecting me topically s i went all gluten-free with all skin care. It has only beed 3 days but I am seeing quick results.
I need to dye my hair, and i am nervous


You should not dye your hair with any products when you have lesions on your scalp. Once your scalp heals then perhaps try Garnier or the Herbatint products. The Herbatint used to come with a packet of conditioner that contains wheat so do read the label and don't use it if it hasn't changed formulas. I think Loreal products are still gluten free but do check the label to be sure.
  • 0
Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying
"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)


celiac 49 years - Misdiagnosed for 45
Blood tested and repeatedly negative
Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002
Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis
All bold resoved or went into remission with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002
Some residual nerve damage remains as of 2006- this has continued to resolve after eliminating soy in 2007

Mother died of celiac related cancer at 56
Twin brother died as a result of autoimmune liver destruction at age 15

Children 2 with Ulcers, GERD, Depression, , 1 with DH, 1 with severe growth stunting (male adult 5 feet)both finally diagnosed Celiac through blood testing and 1 with endo 6 months after Mom


Positive to Soy and Casien also Aug 2007

Gluten Sensitivity Gene Test Aug 2007
HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

#22 Gemini

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Posted 03 December 2012 - 01:42 PM

Dermatitis herpetiformis (DH) is not a skin allergy. Rather, DH is a chronic, extremely itchy rash consisting of papules and vesicles. Although it is often confused with skin allergies, it is actually associated with Celiac Disease (celiac disease), a sensitivity of the intestine to gluten foods in the diet. celiac disease is also not a foold allergy, but rather a disease of the intestines.

This was taken directly from the Asthma and Allergy Foundations webpage and is the same answer I reiceived when I went to the dermatologist for my DH. If you are having a skin reaction to Gluten, it is possible it is an allergy, but if it is blistery and itchey and confirmed to be DH then it is not an allergy it is a reaction to the gluten and you must eliminate it not only in your diet but in your topicial products as well. I wish it was an allergy, then I could just pop a Claritin or Zyrtec or one of those other fancy allergies meds and get on with my day.


DH is caused by ingestion of gluten.....that is correct. But you would not be ingesting hair dye. It would poison you and make you very sick. You cannot develop DH from skin contact with gluten. Read up on it in any good Celiac information/medical book. Surprising, yes, but you have to ingest gluten into your gut to cause a DH outbreak. Anything else is a topical skin allergy.

The other clarification with the above statement is that Celiac is an autoimmune disease, which targets the small intestine. I don't agree that it is a disease of the intestines. Without the autoimmune response, you would not have a problem with your intestinal tract.
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#23 K10

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Posted 03 December 2012 - 08:46 PM

Just thought I would chime in on this (very) old post since its been bumped so much today. I use wella demi perm (can be purchased at Sally Beauty Supply) and Feria conditioner afterwards.

I too had to switch to gluten-free cosmetics/shampoo (which resolved some of my hair loss and all the scalp sores) and have not had trouble with this colour. As far as I know Wella and Feria are still gluten-free
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#24 ajnemajrje

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Posted 20 December 2012 - 05:27 PM

I had the same issues and everytime I picked up a hairdye that I liked, it had wheat or oats in it :(

I am using nice and easy right now because the Loreal brand that has the colours I like is not gluten-free and the Loreal brand I can use, I dont like any of the colours. I wish they at least had the same colour selection. :(
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#25 AnniesVision

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Posted 04 November 2013 - 03:10 PM

Hello to everyone. It is so wonderful to have this format to share important information collectively.
I am surprised at how many Celiacs are not concerned about gluten contact on your skin. Our skin absorbs whatever sits on it (within reason) which is why many medication are given topically.
I am very gluten sensitive so perhaps that is why I have had to learn to be so very cautious. When I was relatively new at this, I dyed my hair at home without giving it a second thought. Because I had been gluten free for a couple if years, I had an awful reaction to the gluten containing hair product that I used. I sat there for 40 minutes with wheat protein sitting on my scalp. About a week later, my head itched like I had ants biting me. I had no skin sores at all, just itching. Within a month, I developed a rash down my back that scanned over like chicken pox. It took months for it to go away. However, the worst part was it threw my body into an autoimmune response. My lymph nodes ached, arthritis flared, systemic yeast was relentless, fatigue, depression and irritability was back. It took almost 6 months to get my body back to feeling healthy again.
You never know what can cause you to become really ill or have a serious reaction. Gluten shut my pituitary gland down. It is nothing to play with or take lightly.
I have a no gluten policy because I must in order to feel healthy. We all know what a pain it can be and also the extra expense. But having had 6 months of feeling as ill as I had while on gluten, I learned my lesson hard.
Nothing touches my body unless I am certain it is gluten free. This even includes laundry soap. It is not worth it. Gluten can shut your adrenal glands down and can wreck your immune system and cause chronic depression and cancer. We all need to be careful...always.
It is good to see (from reading the threads) that there are some gluten free hair dyes out there. I also like to make a quick call to the manufacturer to make certain the information is current. I keep a list on my phone of what I CAN have. If it is not on the list, it doesn't belong in me.
I hope all of you that are new to this will realize that your skin will absorb gluten. Be careful with your bodies. We only get one..
Blessings to all and thank you for all if the wonderful info I have gathered from this site.
Katy
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#26 kareng

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Posted 04 November 2013 - 03:30 PM

Hello to everyone. It is so wonderful to have this format to share important information collectively.
I am surprised at how many Celiacs are not concerned about gluten contact on your skin. Our skin absorbs whatever sits on it (within reason) which is why many medication are given topically.
I am very gluten sensitive so perhaps that is why I have had to learn to be so very cautious. When I was relatively new at this, I dyed my hair at home without giving it a second thought. Because I had been gluten free for a couple if years, I had an awful reaction to the gluten containing hair product that I used. I sat there for 40 minutes with wheat protein sitting on my scalp. About a week later, my head itched like I had ants biting me. I had no skin sores at all, just itching. Within a month, I developed a rash down my back that scanned over like chicken pox. It took months for it to go away. However, the worst part was it threw my body into an autoimmune response. My lymph nodes ached, arthritis flared, systemic yeast was relentless, fatigue, depression and irritability was back. It took almost 6 months to get my body back to feeling healthy again.
You never know what can cause you to become really ill or have a serious reaction. Gluten shut my pituitary gland down. It is nothing to play with or take lightly.
I have a no gluten policy because I must in order to feel healthy. We all know what a pain it can be and also the extra expense. But having had 6 months of feeling as ill as I had while on gluten, I learned my lesson hard.
Nothing touches my body unless I am certain it is gluten free. This even includes laundry soap. It is not worth it. Gluten can shut your adrenal glands down and can wreck your immune system and cause chronic depression and cancer. We all need to be careful...always.
It is good to see (from reading the threads) that there are some gluten free hair dyes out there. I also like to make a quick call to the manufacturer to make certain the information is current. I keep a list on my phone of what I CAN have. If it is not on the list, it doesn't belong in me.
I hope all of you that are new to this will realize that your skin will absorb gluten. Be careful with your bodies. We only get one..
Blessings to all and thank you for all if the wonderful info I have gathered from this site.
Katy

Gluten is too big to be absorbed through the skin. The medications that are absorbed are specially made to be small enough and have special additives that allow them to pass through to the blood stream. Gluten must be in the intestines to cause us to make the antibodies that cause damage.


http://www.curecelia...smetic-products


"What ingredients should I avoid in cosmetic products?
Gluten is only toxic to celiac patients and patients with dermatitis herpetiformis (DH) if ingested. Because gluten cannot be absorbed through the skin, the use of cosmetic and shampoos containing gluten has not been shown to be detrimental to patients with celiac disease or DH. However, we do recommend gluten-free lip products, hand lotions and other products that may end up near the mouth. And, in the case of children, a gluten-free shampoo would be wise."
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