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celiac disease Is Big Time News!


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69 replies to this topic

#61 skbird

 
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Posted 22 February 2006 - 10:34 AM

On the one hand, I am intrigued to see Celiac in the news, but I am disappointed to see it linked with a lawsuit, such as this. There are too many questions involved. Sure, McDonalds had a "gluten free" list published and fries were on that list. Who knows when they added the wheat/dairy parts in. Europe, for example, allows wheat starch in foods called gluten free, and since we still don't technically have a rule to follow in the US, I would think that would right there end the case.

Europe also allows a much higher occurance of gluten to be present in food, isn't it 200 ppm? Wheras Canada (I think, going by memory here) allows 20 or 40 ppm? And the US has no rule, yet? I wonder how many ppm of gluten, if any can be found in these fries? I have to agree, it is just as likely to be cross-contamination.

This might not be fair for me to say as I don't eat fries anyway (intolerant to nightshades) but I can't help thinking if someone is really as sick as the little girl in the lawsuit, why was she being fed McDonalds anyway? I can appreciate cost issues (fast food is often cheap) and people not being thoroughly educated about food/nutrition, but I am concerned about the ramifications of this case as well.

I am sorry for their suffering, and others on this list and beyond who have been sick from McDonalds fries. Maybe the good to come of this will be people making the decision to not rely on cheaply made, non-nutritive foods such as these and pursue healthier avenues of eating.

I know that's what my repeated bad food experiences eating out have done for me, and they've made me a better person. Several people in my office now get excited when I bring home made stuff in, they don't care if it's gluten free, they just enjoy the taste. And that's a good thing.

Stephanie
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Diagnosed by food challenge, 10/04
Gluten-free since 10/04
Gluten-sensitive genes: HLA-DQ 1,3 (Subtype 6,9)
Interstitial Cystitis, 7/07
Fibromyalgia, 6/11

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#62 tiredofdoctors!!!

 
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Posted 22 February 2006 - 10:41 AM

I think you're right. I was talking with a friend of mine last night -- she's an Occupational Therapist -- the first words out of her mouth were "First, if the fries made her child sick, why did she keep taking her there? Second -- if she continued to allow her child to get sick, knowing that each visit made her sick, why isn't Child Protective Services involved?" Hmmmm....
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Lynne

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#63 Rusla

 
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Posted 22 February 2006 - 10:50 AM

The parents should be charged with child endangerment or attempted murder, maybe even Munchausens by Proxy. They kept taking her there and feeding her greasy non nutritious food that made her sick.

Now, as the McD site says their fries "May contain Wheat or Dairy derivatives." That should be enough to make anyone with wheat and dairy problems stand clear.

As Broncobux said the cross contamination issue is probably even bigger.

I remember last year before my dx I did a rare foray to McD's for a hash brown. I saw them not only cook fries, hash-browns but the breaded fish sandwich all in the same fryer.So I would even debate the segregated fryer theory also.
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Rusla

Asthma-1969
wheat/ dairy allergies, lactose/casein intolerance-1980
Multiple food, environmental allergies
allergic to all antibiotics except sulpha
Rheumitoid arthritis,Migraine headaches,TMJ- 1975
fibromyalgia-1995
egg allergy-1997
msg allergy,gall bladder surgery-1972
Skin Biopsy positive DH-Dec.1 2005, confirmed celiac disease
gluten-free totally since Nov. 28, 2005
Hashimoto's Hypothyroidism- 2005
Pernicious Anemia 1999 (still anemic on and off.)
Osteoporosis Aug. 2006


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#64 jerseyangel

 
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Posted 22 February 2006 - 11:04 AM

Yea--where those parents are concerned, gluten aside, why would they take a child to eat somewhere over and over, all the while suspecting that it was making them sick? I just don't get that. And given the fact that the child is a Celiac, it's all the more ridiculous.
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Patti


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#65 kelliac

 
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Posted 22 February 2006 - 11:49 AM

If you read these posts with an open mind I'm sure you can see that we are ALL concerned about others. We are concerned for everyone who is Celiac, or anyone who needs to be on a gluten free diet, we are concerned for those who will someday need to be on this diet, we are concerned for this family's little girl who will grow up and want more choices. Who are these people initiating lawsuits thinking about? Certainly not us. They are not concerned about the consequences of their actions. They see $$$.

I've tried to read all the posts regarding this subject so if I missed something, please don't jump all over me.
I don't know the details of this young child's lawsuit, however, I sympathize with him/her and what he/she faces in court. The lawsuit is good in that it makes people ACCOUNTABLE. People should not claim items are "gluten free" and "safe" for celiacs unless they know for certain they are.
Can't tell you how many times I've picked up an item labeled gluten-free, only to eat it, get sick, and then actually look at the ingredients and find vinegar (which I personally react to--distilled white in particular) or oats (which I understand is questionable) or spelt, etc. And yes, I've learned my lesson not to trust the gluten-free label and instead I read, read, read everything. It is difficult enough finding food safe to eat, but to trust companies who state that an item is gluten free when they know that it isn't, it is immoral at the very least, someday it may be illegal.
If the family is truly suing for monetary awards because of financial difficulties, then that is, of course, not good for celiac disease. Perhaps they should donate all proceeds to celiac research. Does any one know specifics of these suits? If they are just seeking medical expenses and not outrageous sums for "pain and suffering," then what is wrong with that?
On a personal note, having just made a trip to Florida in January, I worried about eating on the road, finding safe foods in restaurants, and taking enough snacks for the hotel rooms. I did my research on this site, online, and on the phone with restaurants. Since I don't normally eat at McDonald's, I looked up gluten free/ dairy free items on their site knowing that there would always be a McD's available at many exits on I-95 should I need a safety fast food choice. It said hashbrowns and scrambled eggs were gluten-free/DF, and I tried them on my second morning of travel. I got sick. Couldn't figure it out. I was so careful. I was scared to eat anything else for most of the trip. I became really, really picky and questioned everything at every restaurant. Was I extreme? I got sick while traveling, away from my comfortable home, stuck in a car for 1000's of miles, and seeking bathrooms. It was not fun. Having heard about the McDonald's lie about gluten free fries/oil problem, I can only wonder if. . .
In conclusion, I try to walk in another person's shoes before I judge them and their motives. Unless you are the person being affected and getting sick, can you really appreciate someone else's pain? Just my two cents.
  • 0
gluten-free since 5/03, dx w/positive bx 5/03, neg. labs 7/03
DQB1,1 (subtype 6,6).
Hashimotos/Graves thyroiditis (ablated), osteoporosis, and too many more to mention.
casein free/dairy free 11/05, since positive enterolab casein test

#66 penguin

 
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Posted 22 February 2006 - 12:04 PM

For the upteenth time....

They legally did nothing wrong.

I don't really think it's an ethics case, either. It's not like the report came out in the post one day that some former employee of McD's suppliers ratted them out for lying. The volunteered the information. And they volunteered it poorly, I suspect they'll be getting a new PR firm.

They don't even have to comply with the new law, it doesn't apply to restaurants, only those that sell prepackaged foods, like in grocery stores.

And they tested the fries immediately after changing their ingredients, and it still came up gluten free.

What you put in your mouth is your responsibility. There is risk in drinking alcohol for anyone, are you going to sue bacardi because you had a hangover the next day? Or because you're an alocholic and your liver is shot?

Also, I have yet to see a gluten-free product that lists oats as an ingredient. When a product says wheat free but doesn't say gluten free, it's usually spelt or oats.


I'm sorry you get sick from those things, but plenty of people get sick from places like McD's and they have no intolerances. There's just a lot of grease and other things that are bad for you that tend to make people sick.

Having gluten free options out is a privilege. Don't ruin it for the rest of us.

EDIT: I made it sound like I was their lawyer. I'm irked at how it was handled, but I don't think they had malicious intent. If they had, they would have hid it for as long as possible. McD's has never agreed with me, so I try not to eat there. I just hate how people are making this into a big money grabbing opportunity.
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Alright, don't worry even if things end up a bit too heavy
We'll all float on, alright
Well we'll float on good news is on the way...

#67 VegasCeliacBuckeye

 
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Posted 22 February 2006 - 12:24 PM

Lawsuit = Less Places for us to eat


Its pretty simple...

Owners of restaurants will run for the hills rather than provide a gluten-free menu if they think they will be sued.

This lawsuit does nothing for our cause....absolutely nothing

In theory, it may make people accountable, but in reality all it does is prevent restaurants from offering gluten free food.

Nobody wants to be sued...

Also, McD's did not "lie" -- they were recently exonerated by the Doctor in Nebraska who tested the oil (it was found to have no allergens)

Cross-contamination will make you sick more often than not...

For long trips, pack a cooler with 10-15 gluten-free sandwiches, plenty of snacks, plenty of pop/gatorade.

Lastly, we are all Celiacs, we know what it is like to be "glutened" -- you don't see us suing anyone.

I think your heart is in the right place, but these lawsuits will/could have a "chilling" effect on restaurants throughout the country and their willingness to offer gluten-free items -- hence, if the family is willing to sacrifice that for their lawsuit, then who is really being selfish???
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#68 kelliac

 
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Posted 22 February 2006 - 01:26 PM

For the upteenth time....

They legally did nothing wrong.

I don't really think it's an ethics case, either. . . . Having gluten free options out is a privilege. Don't ruin it for the rest of us.

Not a lawyer, but misrepresentation or false claims sounds legally wrong to me.
  • 0
gluten-free since 5/03, dx w/positive bx 5/03, neg. labs 7/03
DQB1,1 (subtype 6,6).
Hashimotos/Graves thyroiditis (ablated), osteoporosis, and too many more to mention.
casein free/dairy free 11/05, since positive enterolab casein test

#69 Rusla

 
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Posted 22 February 2006 - 02:04 PM

McD did not show malice and intent to be misleading. They went by what they were told by the manufacturer of the product, they are not the manufacturer. They are loosely called a restaurant. These lawsuits will only cause problems for all of us in the future. If any restuarant does have a gluten-free menu get prepared to have to sign waivers before eating if these people win.

I am leaving for Jamaica in one week, I know for a fact that the person who booked all of the flights did NOT tell Air Canada about my dietary needs. So, I will bring fruit with me on the plane to eat on the trip. This way I won't be sick because of airplane food. Let's face it airplane food will make most people sick, especially on Air Canada.
  • 0
Rusla

Asthma-1969
wheat/ dairy allergies, lactose/casein intolerance-1980
Multiple food, environmental allergies
allergic to all antibiotics except sulpha
Rheumitoid arthritis,Migraine headaches,TMJ- 1975
fibromyalgia-1995
egg allergy-1997
msg allergy,gall bladder surgery-1972
Skin Biopsy positive DH-Dec.1 2005, confirmed celiac disease
gluten-free totally since Nov. 28, 2005
Hashimoto's Hypothyroidism- 2005
Pernicious Anemia 1999 (still anemic on and off.)
Osteoporosis Aug. 2006


Creative people need maids.

#70 penguin

 
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Posted 22 February 2006 - 02:04 PM

Not a lawyer, but misrepresentation or false claims sounds legally wrong to me.



To have false claims, you have to know that your claims are false. To misrepresent something, you have to actually misrepresent it.

They volunteered the information, they were not *exposed*

Also, there are no FDA regluations regarding gluten-free labelling, so companies go by the Codex standard. As has already been said, they were exonerated by lab tests showing the fries are gluten-free. Therefore, they made no false claims to begin with.

Knowing lab practices, I'm sure they took several samples from several different batches. Labs, especially academic labs, nearly always do more than one sample of anything.

Any lawsuit is going to be a joke, legally. But it will scare the bejeezus out of other chains.
  • 0
Alright, don't worry even if things end up a bit too heavy
We'll all float on, alright
Well we'll float on good news is on the way...




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