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Rich Chocolate Ovaltine?


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10 replies to this topic

#1 penguin

 
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Posted 18 February 2006 - 05:48 PM

I'm finding some conflicting information about our friend Ovaltine...

I know the malt and chocolate malt are obviously a no, but what about the Rich Chocolate flavor? I thought I saw somewhere it was gluten-free... :huh:

I thought it would be good for getting extra vitamins, since I have a lot of trouble taking vitamins. Also, it's my ultimate comfort drink since that's what my mom gave me when I couldn't sleep :(

That and it's yummy :lol:

Here are the ingredients:

sugar, cocoa processed with alkali, whey (milk), salt, carrgeenan, mono and diglycerides, artificial flavor, colored with yellow 6, red 40, and blue 1

Vitamins and minerals: magnesium oxide, dicalcium phosphate, high chromium yeast, ascorbic acid, ferric orthophosphate, vitamin E acetate, copper glutonate, zinc sulfate, niacinamide, vitamin A palmitate, calcium pantothenate, pryidoxine hydrochloride, thiamine hydrochloride, biotin

Anyone know anything about it? Much appreciated :)
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#2 nettiebeads

 
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Posted 18 February 2006 - 06:23 PM

Looks safe. Does the label contain the universal disclaimer "processed in a facility that also processes wheat products?"
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#3 penguin

 
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Posted 18 February 2006 - 06:31 PM

Looks safe. Does the label contain the universal disclaimer "processed in a facility that also processes wheat products?"



Nope, Ovaltine is very shelf stable and not that popular so it'll probably take a while to get their inventory cleared out enough to have an allergy statement on there <_<

No allergy statement at all, but I looked at the malt ones to compare labeling, and they had parentheses around things like whey (milk) and malt (barley), so maybe they label that way, too?
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#4 penguin

 
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Posted 21 February 2006 - 07:58 AM

In case anyone cares...

I called Ovaltine and they verified that the Milk Chocolate flavor is gluten-free.

It was on the Delphi list, but it hadn't been verified since 2002 so I thought I'd check. :)
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#5 salexski

 
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Posted 06 March 2009 - 01:18 PM

Nestle now owns Ovaltine and there is a new package design to the Rich Chocolate flavor, at least where I buy it (Maryland). They have added a statement below the ingredients that states that Ovaltine is manufactured on shared equipment with soy and wheat. I called March 3rd and spoke to a representative to find out when this change went into effect. He didn't give me a date but it was part of the Nestle "take over."
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#6 hermitgirl

 
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Posted 07 March 2009 - 07:33 PM

They added the universal disclaimer late last year. I had noticed it shortly after being diagnosed. I really noticed it after I got sick shorly after having some, so not sure if Nestle has taken over the physical manufacturing part yet, to make sure everything is clean and all that. Now I use the Kroger Brand sugar free instant breakfast. Kroger has always had the policy of marking everything clearly, and does not contain that disclaimer. Though it does contain soy and dairy.
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#7 larry mac

 
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Posted 07 March 2009 - 09:57 PM

I've been using it for over two years now. I switched from the regular malted Ovalteen, which I had used for decades, to the non-malted kind, when I got diagnosed. Never once have I had a reaction, nor did it impair my quick recovery. I'd be willing to bet they've always been made on shared lines. Makes perfect sense. Two products, almost identical ingredients. They're not trying to claim the one is gluten-free.

I like it cause it dissolves so readily. Plus it taste good. It's good stuff.

best regards, lm
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#8 abrowning

 
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Posted 24 June 2009 - 10:12 AM

I emailed customer service on Ovaltine's website yesterday and received the following response from them:

"Thank you for contacting us. Your comments regarding OvaltineŽ Rich Chocolate are very important to us regarding your gluten concerns. Yes Ovaltine contains barley malt extract and/or is made on equipment that also processes wheat.

In regards to your inquiry, there are eight major food allergens, including milk, eggs, peanuts, tree nuts (such as walnuts and almonds), soy, wheat, fish and shellfish. Labeling regulation requires that all ingredients added to products be listed in the ingredient statement. For these eight major allergens, Nestlé ensures that they are labeled, regardless of the amount or whether a supplier may have added it to their ingredient. It is the responsibility of Nestlé to ensure that these ingredients are properly labeled by their common or usual name in the ingredient statement.

We want to help our consumers avoid inadvertent ingestion of their specific allergens of concern by accurately informing them about the product ingredients and by following Good Manufacturing Practices in our factories. All factories using a critical allergen as an ingredient must take all reasonable precautions to avoid cross-contact of products that do not normally contain these allergens and products that do not carry a specific mention in the ingredient statement. These precautionary measures include efficient cleaning of production lines and equipment and strict separation of materials that may contain critical allergens. If an allergen does not appear on the ingredient statement, then it has not been added to the product and the likelihood of cross-contamination contact is so extremely low that the risk is insignificant."
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#9 fruhead

 
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Posted 27 October 2009 - 04:52 AM

10.27.09
8:44 a.m.

I just called Ovaltine and the rep said that because it is processed in a facility that also processes wheat, there is no guarantee of it being gluten free due to the possibility of cross contamination. I also found Ovaltine to be a "comfort" drink and had it before bedtime for extra nutrition. Alas, no more. (Sniff!)

I started getting sick again in the past few weeks, I guess around the same time I had the "newly packaged" Ovaltine. It's frustrating when I think I'm doing all the right things and I'm still getting slammed from a mysterious source. I had to call Ovaltine this moring for peace of mind. I'm glad I now know to avoid it.

Now I'm on the hunt for a new, nutritious chocolate mix before bedtime. Any suggestions?

Thanks!
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#10 StacyA

 
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Posted 01 November 2009 - 02:09 PM

What about Carnation Instant Breakfast powder? I used to use Ovalteen every day in my coffee, and I switched to Carnation when I went gluten-free. (However I'm still in the early stages of gluten-free, so I may not yet be able to recognize getting glutened) This is from the Carnation website, and there have been prior posts about it: "For our Powders, the only variety containing gluten is Classic Chocolate Malt, which has wheat flour and barley extracts. All other Powder varieties do not contain gluten." (I don't recall if they have the CYA - 'processed in a facility...' disclaimer on the actual package - I buy a big container and put it in a nice looking canister next to the coffee pot.)

- Stacy
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#11 ravenwoodglass

 
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Posted 02 November 2009 - 03:32 AM

What about Carnation Instant Breakfast powder? I used to use Ovalteen every day in my coffee, and I switched to Carnation when I went gluten-free. (However I'm still in the early stages of gluten-free, so I may not yet be able to recognize getting glutened) This is from the Carnation website, and there have been prior posts about it: "For our Powders, the only variety containing gluten is Classic Chocolate Malt, which has wheat flour and barley extracts. All other Powder varieties do not contain gluten." (I don't recall if they have the CYA - 'processed in a facility...' disclaimer on the actual package - I buy a big container and put it in a nice looking canister next to the coffee pot.)

- Stacy


I used the Chocolate all the time for a long time. I never had an issue with it. Before I was diagnosed I used to mix it in with my coffee in the morning as it was the only thing I could have for breakfast that wouldn't make me sick.
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celiac 49 years - Misdiagnosed for 45
Blood tested and repeatedly negative
Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002
Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis
All bold resoved or went into remission with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002
Some residual nerve damage remains as of 2006- this has continued to resolve after eliminating soy in 2007

Mother died of celiac related cancer at 56
Twin brother died as a result of autoimmune liver destruction at age 15

Children 2 with Ulcers, GERD, Depression, , 1 with DH, 1 with severe growth stunting (male adult 5 feet)both finally diagnosed Celiac through blood testing and 1 with endo 6 months after Mom


Positive to Soy and Casien also Aug 2007

Gluten Sensitivity Gene Test Aug 2007
HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)




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