Get email alerts Get Celiac.com E-mail Alerts  




Celiac.com Sponsor:
Celiac.com Sponsor:




Ads by Google:






   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

'eat What You Want' Pill Caution
0

36 posts in this topic

Ditto about the research, Bev and Vincent. I told Dr. Paterson how he gave me a lot of hope --- not only for myself/Celiacs, but for others. They are taking a huge risk (in terms of money) and medical advancements aren't made without risks. He really inspired me!!!!!!!!! I wish I had a video of the talk for everyone to see!!!

Vincent-I don't remember if he mentioned when the next round (Phase II) of testing will be begin. He did talk a lot about requirements for people to be able to participate (proven biopsy, etc.) but I don't recall about timeframe for testing. There were others from my Celiac group (VaBeach) that were at the Richmond meeting---I can ask at our next meeting if anyone has an answer to that. Maybe the press release that comes out Monday will address it?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Ads by Google:

Laura, a question:

It's my understanding that the recognition of the 33-mer that triggers the reaction occurs in the gut. So I don't understand how suppressing zonulin to 'keep the gates closed' makes any difference. Is the implication here that the immune reaction does *not* take place in the gut, but outside of the intestines?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

hey tarnalberry,

Yes, that is what I took from it, and from the pictures that were presented. (that the reaction occurs once the gluten has breeched barrier cells, through the tight junction). Now, I don't understand it fully, but that is the basis that the zonulin research is going on. But, yes, I do believe it is the 33-mer that triggers the reaction for Celiacs...My understanding was that it is ok until it breeches the barrier cells, and then the auto-immune cells (in Celiacs) recognize that chain as "bad."

I took this from the website of Alba Therapeutics, under "Celiac Disease"

"It is known that altered intestinal permeability (leaky gut) is a hallmark of celiac disease and tracks the severity of the disease. It is likely that zonulin-induced leaky gut is both a cause and a consequence of the disease, facilitating transport to gluten which then triggers an inflammatory process, resulting in a leak which can be blocked by zonulin antagonists."

Hope that helps?! Let me know.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow--thanks Laura--this is all so interesting :)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks girl---I am just trying to present the information the best I can from what I heard and took notes on! I seriously wish everyone could have been there!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites




Thanks girl---I am just trying to present the information the best I can from what I heard and took notes on! I seriously wish everyone could have been there!

Im gald you did!!!

BTW PLEASE link the news release when its up :D

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, I tell ya--I appreciate you taking the time to take notes and posting for us. I would love to have been there. It is exciting to think of what might come out of all this.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybe I'm just extremely skeptical, maybe it's just because I have bad reactions to drugs, but I would still choose the diet. If others want to use it, and it really works, then I am glad for them! B)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As requested:

http://www.celiac.com/st_prod.html?p_prodid=1310

Alba Therapeutics Announces Positive Celiac Disease Trial Results

Celiac.com 03/14/2006 - Alba Therapeutics Corporation announced today successful completion of Phase Ib proof-of-concept studies for its lead compound, AT1001. In a 21-patient cohort of celiac disease sufferers, the oral administration of AT1001 versus placebo control induced a significantly positive result in the trial's primary target endpoint.

"We anticipated a strong signal, however, the magnitude of the response surpassed our expectations," stated Blake Paterson, M.D., President and CEO of Alba. "We are particularly excited, as to the best of our knowledge this is the first demonstration of a desired and systemic immunological effect resulting from a physiological event at a mucosal surface."

AT1001 is an antagonist to the zonulin system -- a signaling pathway discovered by Alessio Fasano, M.D., Professor of Pediatrics, Medicine and Physiology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, and the basis of Alba's extensive intellectual property portfolio.

About Zonulin

Zonulin is a signaling protein that transiently and reversibly opens the tight junctions ("tj") between the cells of epithelial and endothelial tissues such as the intestinal mucosa, blood brain barrier and pulmonary epithelia. Zonulin appears to be involved in many diseases in which leakage occurs via paracellular transport across epithelial and endothelial tight junctions (tj), and thus may play an important potential role in the treatment of autoimmune diseases.

About Celiac Disease

Celiac disease (celiac disease) is a T-cell mediated auto-immune disease that occurs in genetically susceptible individuals and is characterized by small intestinal inflammation, injury and intolerance to gluten. According to the National Institutes of Health, celiac disease affects approximately 3 million Americans, although the diagnosis is rarely made. The only current treatment for celiac disease is complete elimination of gluten from the diet, which results in remission for some patients.

About Alba

Alba Therapeutics Corporation is a privately held biopharmaceutical company based in Baltimore, Maryland. Alba is dedicated to commercializing disease-modifying therapeutics and drug delivery adjuvants based on the zonulin pathway. Alba's lead molecule, AT-1001, is targeted towards the treatment of celiac disease and other auto-immune illnesses.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think about the drugs that say they will cure psoriasis etc. But the side effects are heart attack etc. I think I have enough poison drugs in my system with my inhalers which I need. I do not need a pill that allows me to eat something to find out in the end it my destroy an important organ in my body or something else. I am just as happy being gluten-free than taking something which they may find out in 5 years gives you a heart attack, kidney diseased or brain tumor.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

While I completely understand your position on drugs, I still think it is exciting that this drug might change how other autoimmune disorders are treated (i.e., the ones that can't be controlled by diet)!!!!!!!

I think it is still important to conduct research and have break-throughs in medical technology.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
0

  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      104,352
    • Total Posts
      920,503
  • Topics

  • Posts

    • I already did. Thats how i found the place. Its amazing to actually go to a restraunt again.
    • This is EXACTLY what happens to me. It has twice now and both times was after both glutening episodes but once it was the day after and the other time it was a week and a half. So I'm still not sure if it's related or strange bug bites...

      Did they stop happening when she stopped being glutened? Did you decide they were definitely related? I'm really confused by this and would love to know whether to insecticide my house or....
    • Thankyou both! I was wondering if my high levels left much doubt on the diagnosis. I don't see the GI until the 15th Sep and I don't think I can stand to eat gluten in that time. If he tells me to I will do so after then. After 25 years of symptoms I don't think there is much chance of healing my bowel In a couple of weeks. I'm actually terrified of the damage they might find. But I think I will need the endo since there may be other things going on with me. So great they didn't put your son through the biopsy! Once I have a formal diagnosis I have my kids to worry about also. I can't even stand the thought of my daughter having a blood test. I think she would need to be sedated as she is so fearful and pain sensitive. My son is not yet 2 so I don't think they will test him. I'm feeling so off at the moment. I think I have some anxiety and reflux going on complicating things quite a bit.
    • My son's antibodies were 300. Based on his extremely high levels, his pediatric GI suggested genetic testing instead of the biopsy. Genetic testing can't diagnose celiac on its own but combined with such high levels, the gi dr was confident a positive genetic test would confidently diagnose celiac. He warned that biopsies are small snapshots of the intestine and can miss damage. He said this is an approach used very often in Europe but not as much in the US. What sold me on that approach was the ability to put my son directly on a gluten free diet instead of waiting three weeks for the biopsy, during which time he would continue to eat gluten and feel terrible. I'm not sure if this is more common with younger patients though (our son is two), based on the idea that he's had less time to inflict damage that would show in a biopsy? We are very happy that we immediately started the gluten free diet and chose the genetic testing. Our son got the proper diagnosis and his recent number shows a drop to 71 after only 4.5 months gluten free! Not sure if this helps. Good luck and I hope you feel better soon!
    • We have been off gluten for a while now, and symptoms return when I've allowed gluten full meals… so something still isn't sitting right with me.  Checking with her doc about seeing a pediactric GI although I'm not sure how long that will take since we live in small town America. I know she didn't get at least one of the recommended full panel tests but maybe two, can someone help clarify, or is she missing two? DGP for sure and possibly EMA? And if I understand what I'm reading in other posts that the DGP can be more accurate? Thanks Her blood panel results: Ttg ab iga <.5u/ml ttg igg <.8u/ml aga ab iga <.2 u/ml aga an igg <.7u/ml iga 61mg/dL  
  • Upcoming Events

  • Blog Entries

  • Recent Status Updates

  • Who's Online (See full list)

  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      61,417
    • Most Online
      1,763

    Newest Member
    Suzette Porter
    Joined