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Celiac, Brain Fog, And Alzheimer's


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12 replies to this topic

#1 Fiddle-Faddle

 
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Posted 08 April 2006 - 08:28 AM

I didn't realize how serious the brain fog (mentioned by many of you) thing was until some of you described in detail how severe it is. When I read some of your posts, I googled ceilac and Alzheimer's, and found so many links, it's scary. I apologize to those of you who think this is old news--I never made the connection before (must be brain fog).

Here's one link--there are many others:http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=9088382&dopt=Abstract

So WHY aren't thee more studies on gluten???????????

Another question: do Italians, who seem to have bread or pasta as the main dish for every single meal, have a higher incidence of autoimmune disease and/or Alzheimer's? Or do they have a genetically highger threshold for gluten?
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#2 Jnkmnky

 
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Posted 08 April 2006 - 10:38 AM

I didn't realize how serious the brain fog (mentioned by many of you) thing was until some of you described in detail how severe it is. When I read some of your posts, I googled ceilac and Alzheimer's, and found so many links, it's scary. I apologize to those of you who think this is old news--I never made the connection before (must be brain fog).

Here's one link--there are many others:http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=9088382&dopt=Abstract

So WHY aren't thee more studies on gluten???????????

Another question: do Italians, who seem to have bread or pasta as the main dish for every single meal, have a higher incidence of autoimmune disease and/or Alzheimer's? Or do they have a genetically highger threshold for gluten?


I don't know, but Thanks for validating the brain fog. During it, there's nothing you can do to get control of it. I think of my son who was in a peptide induced brain fog for the first three years of his life and I can't believe he's ok. Being held back one year in school seems like he got off pretty well considering how doped he was during those formative learning years! I really get sick thinking of those who are suffering RIGHT NOW, and have NO idea it's the gluten. It's heartbreaking. Lives being wasted.
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#3 trents

 
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Posted 08 April 2006 - 01:15 PM

Fiddle-Faddle,

The link you gave indicates there is no connection between Alzheimers and Celiac disease. Am I missing something?
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#4 SurreyGirl

 
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Posted 09 April 2006 - 10:22 AM

I think looking at celiac only (in comparison with Alzheimers) is too limiting.. The whole spectrum stretches much further to no-gut symptoms gluten sensitivity.

In Alzheimers, the problem in the brain occurs because of a build up of plaques, sometimes called calcification (could these be made from calcium? - or is it just a general term?). Another reason is vascular problems (mechanical or biochemical). I am sure there are more reasons too. When you look at many other gluten-related conditions (dermatitis herpetiformis, nephropathy, many more), you also come across deposits of some sort - possibly calcium too(?) - maybe others, salts? And then stones, obstructions etc that are mentioned in Dangerous Grains, definitely have gluten connection. All this, on top of autoimmunity..

To me it still seems that gluten not only stops nutrients getting to their destinations, but that those CIC (circulating immume complexes caused by gluten) build up some sort of obstructions in various places in the body - and all along this would also slow down (even halt?) removal of the metabolic toxins? Because it all starts in capillaries, the deterioration tends to be gradual rather than sudden - at least at first.

NB. This is just me thinking, but I have read about these ways of the gluten interference in many separate places. I have also heard some of it directly from various doctors and have a first hand experience from seeing my son and others with symptoms of celiac/possible celiac/gluten sensitivity that affects the brain.
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#5 Rusla

 
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Posted 09 April 2006 - 12:38 PM

Brain fog, the bane of my existence. Up until the time I had pernicious anemia and my mind starting taking a hike, I could spell any word for any one. They wouldn't even use the dicitionary, they would ask me. Since then I forget where I am, I can't spell for me, that is very distressing. I hope someday, being gluten-free that, I can get all of that back.
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#6 Nancym

 
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Posted 09 April 2006 - 12:43 PM

I've been watching with interest as it seems like Alzheimer's might be a new type of diabetes where the brain isn't able to produce insulin. I've seen 3 different studies that indicated this.
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#7 carlag

 
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Posted 01 August 2006 - 02:10 AM

Hello all,
I'm new to this, so am fumbling my way through. Am looking for information about 'celiac brain fog' and just what it feels like to others. I've heard the term, and am wondering if I am experiencing this, or something else.

These days my brain (whole head, actually) feels like it's been anaesthetized. Sometimes my head throbs with my heart beat (not painful like a headache, but I am terribly aware of every heartbeat as I feel it in my head). Sometimes it feels like a balloon has been inflated inside my head, and sometimes it feels like there's something really tight around my head.

Only for a brief time each day (in the morning) do I seem to be free of any of these feelings. As the day progresses, the feelings increase, making it difficult to function by the time afternoon rolls around.

My doctor sent me for scans and found that I've had a minor stroke, so I'm confused as to whether these strange feelings in my head are from my old friend celiac disease, or from my new friend, stroke.

Would really appreciate hearing from others about what the brain fog feels like, to help me make sense of what's happening in my head.

Many thanks.
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Aus-merican (born in the US, resident of Australia for 19+ years, citizen of both)
Diagnosed March 2003
Follow-up gastroscopies indicate gut still hasn't improved after 3 years of a gluten-free diet
Gastroenterologist now uses the term 'refractory coeliac disease' when ordering blood tests
Steroid trial caused intolerable gut symptoms, like pre-diagnosis days

#8 dionnek

 
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Posted 01 August 2006 - 04:24 AM

Are you gluten free? I never knew what the "brain fog" was really until my first true glutening since going gluten-free (just dx 2 months ago) - about 5-6 hours after the accidental glutening I started feeling drunk, even though I had not had anything to drink. I felt light headed and "fuzzy", like my reflexes were impaired. I felt like I was talking and thinking slowly. LUckily it was in the evening and I was at home - I definitley don't think I could have driven anywhere - might have gotten a DUI :)
HOpe this helps - this is just my first experience (I'm dealing with the other affects of the glutening still - the brain fog though only lasted a few hours, then just headache like a hangover).
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#9 Nancym

 
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Posted 01 August 2006 - 08:09 AM

Some of my brain fog also came from dairy. Once I got off all the things I'm intolerant of, it went away! Took awhile but I rarely have it now. I remember I used to sit in front of my computer trying to remember my passwords. Now they just come shooting out the end of my fingers. :P
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#10 Sarah8793

 
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Posted 01 August 2006 - 09:12 AM

This is a topic I am very interested in. My father's mother and her 2 siblings all had alzheimers. I often wonder if it isn't celiac related. None of them knew anything about celiac disease. There is a connection between diabetes and celiac disease and it won't surprise me if alzheimers is related somehow also. It will be interesting to see what others have to add to this thread. Thanks for posting. :)

Sarah
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#11 carlag

 
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Posted 01 August 2006 - 01:38 PM

Yes, I am SO gluten free! Diagnosed ~2-1/2 years ago (blood tests followed by biopsy); went gluten free; had follow up biopsy about 6 months later (no improvement); various follow up blood tests since then (no improvement). Have been sent to see dieticians several times - each time they couldn't find anything I've been doing wrong, and have commented that I'm much more stringent than most. Current gastroenterologist suggests that gluten is still in my diet from contamination or false labelling (products labelled gluten-free but aren't), and tells me to treat everything with suspicion, and eat only the food that I prepare myself. So I bake all my own bread, cookies, etc, avoid packaged foods, don't eat out...

The brain fog you describe does sound familiar though. I am definitely slower, have to search my head for words, feel off balance at times, and like you, don't feel that driving is a good idea (haven't even tried it for several weeks - since all this started.

Thanks for telling me about your brain fog - sounds like my fuzziness must be from something else...?
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Aus-merican (born in the US, resident of Australia for 19+ years, citizen of both)
Diagnosed March 2003
Follow-up gastroscopies indicate gut still hasn't improved after 3 years of a gluten-free diet
Gastroenterologist now uses the term 'refractory coeliac disease' when ordering blood tests
Steroid trial caused intolerable gut symptoms, like pre-diagnosis days

#12 kbtoyssni

 
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Posted 02 August 2006 - 08:08 AM

I've been watching with interest as it seems like Alzheimer's might be a new type of diabetes where the brain isn't able to produce insulin. I've seen 3 different studies that indicated this.


Do you have any articles on this? Sounds interesting, and I'd like to read more about it.
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#13 carlag

 
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Posted 02 August 2006 - 01:25 PM

Do you have any articles on this? Sounds interesting, and I'd like to read more about it.


Same here; please do tell us where to find these articles.
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Aus-merican (born in the US, resident of Australia for 19+ years, citizen of both)
Diagnosed March 2003
Follow-up gastroscopies indicate gut still hasn't improved after 3 years of a gluten-free diet
Gastroenterologist now uses the term 'refractory coeliac disease' when ordering blood tests
Steroid trial caused intolerable gut symptoms, like pre-diagnosis days




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