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Omg...i Might Be On To Something


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#16 jerseyangel

 
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Posted 19 April 2006 - 06:23 AM

Hi Rachel--I am corn intolerant, also. My Kinesiologist told me to avoid it back 2 years ago. I have tried it since--in the form of popcorn (organic/made myself) and as corn syrup in sorbet. Bad idea both times! It is true that it seems to be in everything. I just read every label (for everything, it seems!) and stay away from it as best I can. I think that in my case, the amount used as binders in pills--which is the only thing I can think of that I still use that contains corn--does not cause symptoms, so I don't worry about that. I also don't notice much of a problem with small amounts of cornstarch--like a teaspoon in a whole recipe. For me, avoiding corn and corn syrups seem to be enough. I really hope this is the missing piece to your puzzle! :)
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#17 flagbabyds

 
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Posted 19 April 2006 - 06:26 AM

Corn free is really hard, I have been doing it for a month now, and haven't had a trip to the ER yet in anaphalixis. It makes my stomach feel so much better in every way!
I don't eat any processed foods, and there is a way to make corn free baking powder, not sure right now, but I will post the recipe when I get home from school.
It's hard at first, but it should make you feel better soon!
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#18 Ursa Major

 
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Posted 19 April 2006 - 07:16 AM

Rachel, here's baking powder: 1 tablespoon cream of tartar, 1/2 tablespoon baking soda, 1/2 tablespoon arrowroot. That's it, it works just as well as the stuff you buy.
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#19 Jnkmnky

 
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Posted 19 April 2006 - 08:18 AM

http://www.allergygr...CH&Search=xcorn

Here are a bunch of corn free products from Allergy grocery. If you look through the products, you'll see that at least some of them are probably stuff that your local health food store carries. You don't have to buy them on line, but you'll have a head's up on what's corn free without having to read labels. The Agave nector is good. We have that. :)
Well, good luck with it all. It sounds like you might have found the answer and can finally get feeling better!
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#20 Fiddle-Faddle

 
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Posted 19 April 2006 - 09:09 AM

Before you toss your flours and xanthan, if frozen corn and tortillas don't bother you but bread and cakes do could you be reacting to the leavening agent, yeasts etc? Just a thought.


Well, now that's an idea I hadn't thought of! Gee--maybe that's why I didn't react to the CHinese dumpling....

Thanks, Ravenwoodglass, I'll have to check into this!
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#21 Rachel--24

 
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Posted 19 April 2006 - 09:15 AM

As far as the thyroid medicine is concerned, are there any supplements that work the same way as your medicine, but don't contain corn? Just a thought.


Nope...there is nothing that can subsitute for thyroid meds.
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#22 Rachel--24

 
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Posted 19 April 2006 - 09:36 AM

Rachel,
What symptoms are you having still?? Just curious. I too have symptoms of stuff still. I do feel better gluten free, but feel that there is something bothering me still. Have you tried giving up meat before? Monica


My symptoms are basically poor digestion, cant gain weight, swelling, fluid retention, headaches, fatigue, brainfog, dont feel good when I eat, cant tolerate alot of foods....this is when I'm taking my meds, vitamins and supplements but eating no corn. I have problems with oils...I'm thinking they have corn in them.

If I actually EAT something with corn in it....I feel "glutened". Maybe I've actually never been glutened...maybe I've only been "corned". :blink:
I get a worsening of all my symptoms, more reactive to other foods, muscle and joint pains, burning sensations, blurred vision, numbness and tingling, nightsweats and bad dreams.. Thats why I avoid processed foods. The reactions suck...plus I lose weight.

I never get these type of reactions from meat, meat actually makes me feel good but sometimes its hard to digest so I cant eat tons of it.

Corn free is really hard, I have been doing it for a month now, and haven't had a trip to the ER yet in anaphalixis. It makes my stomach feel so much better in every way!
I don't eat any processed foods, and there is a way to make corn free baking powder, not sure right now, but I will post the recipe when I get home from school.
It's hard at first, but it should make you feel better soon!


Molly,

Theres a brand called Featherweight or something like that....suppossedely its the only brand thats corn-free. Ursula posted the recipe...I think I've seen it in one of my baking books.

I think I may have seen you at the game! Were you by any chance on crutches? If you were then I walked right past you. If not then it was another "orange" girl who looked alot like you. :)

http://www.allergygr...CH&Search=xcorn

Here are a bunch of corn free products from Allergy grocery. If you look through the products, you'll see that at least some of them are probably stuff that your local health food store carries. You don't have to buy them on line, but you'll have a head's up on what's corn free without having to read labels. The Agave nector is good. We have that. :)
Well, good luck with it all. It sounds like you might have found the answer and can finally get feeling better!


JnkMnky,

I was checking out that site last night. You can type in your allergen and get a whole list of stuff. I saw marshmallows on there!! I was pretty excited about that. I've been kinda p'd off about not being able to tolerate one freakin marshmallow all this time. I was so confused as to why I couldnt have any gluten-free foods. Ummm...maybe its because I needed to be corn-free instead. :huh:
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Rachel

#23 Green12

 
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Posted 19 April 2006 - 09:37 AM

Simply V and I were discussing this very thing the last few days in another thread under "Celiac Saliva Test" in pre-diagnosis and symptoms.

Simply V suggested I look into a corn allergy because everything I eat makes me sick, even when I am staying away from gluten. Corn is in almost everything apparently and difficult to completely eliminate. Simply V directed me to a support group on delphi- Avoiding Corn- where there is lots of information on eliminating corn.
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#24 Rachel--24

 
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Posted 19 April 2006 - 09:44 AM

On the topic of baking powder....is it necessary for baking? I'm new at baking and I stopped using the powder because I just felt like it was "bad" for some reason. Everytime I used it I felt worse so I just used baking soda instead. My stuff doesnt come out great but its edible and I'm not picky so I eat it no matter what. What purpose does the tiny bit of baking powder in a recipe serve? Is it gonna make a huge difference in the final outcome?

Simply V and I were discussing this very thing the last few days in another thread under "Celiac Saliva Test" in pre-diagnosis and symptoms.

Simply V suggested I look into a corn allergy because everything I eat makes me sick, even when I am staying away from gluten. Corn is in almost everything apparently and difficult to completely eliminate. Simply V directed me to a support group on delphi- Avoiding Corn- where there is lots of information on eliminating corn.


Julie, I actually read that thread which is what put the thought in my head to begin with. I checked out the corn site and learned about the xanthan gum and all the other stuff...it kind of all made sense when I went back to my food diaries and started looking at the ingredients of what I'd been eating. I think I might email her....she seems to be the expert on corn stuff. :)
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Rachel

#25 penguin

 
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Posted 19 April 2006 - 09:45 AM

On the topic of baking powder....is it necessary for baking? I'm new at baking and I stopped using the powder because I just felt like it was "bad" for some reason. Everytime I used it I felt worse so I just used baking soda instead. My stuff doesnt come out great but its edible and I'm not picky so I eat it no matter what. What purpose does the tiny bit of baking powder in a recipe serve? Is it gonna make a huge difference in the final outcome?


From about.com:

Q. What Is the Difference Between Baking Soda & Baking Powder?

A.
Both baking soda and baking powder are leavening agents, which means they are added to baked goods before cooking to produce carbon dioxide and cause them to 'rise'. Baking powder contains baking soda, but the two substances are used under different conditions.

Baking Soda


Baking soda is pure sodium bicarbonate. When baking soda is combined with moisture and an acidic ingredient (e.g., yogurt, chocolate, buttermilk, honey), the resulting chemical reaction produces bubbles of carbon dioxide that expand under oven temperatures, causing baked goods to rise. The reaction begins immediately upon mixing the ingredients, so you need to bake recipes which call for baking soda immediately, or else they will fall flat!

Baking Powder

Baking powder contains sodium bicarbonate, but it includes the acidifying agent already (cream of tartar), and also a drying agent (usually starch).

Baking powder is available as single-acting baking powder and as double-acting baking powder. Single-acting powders are activated by moisture, so you must bake recipes which include this product immediately after mixing. Double-acting powders react in two phases and can stand for a while before baking. With double-acting powder, some gas is released at room temperature when the powder is added to dough, but the majority of the gas is released after the temperature of the dough increases in the oven.

How Are Recipes Determined?

Some recipes call for baking soda, while others call for baking powder. Which ingredient is used depends on the other ingredients in the recipe. The ultimate goal is to produce a tasty product with a pleasing texture. Baking soda is basic and will yield a bitter taste unless countered by the acidity of another ingredient, such as buttermilk. You'll find baking soda in cookie recipes. Baking powder contains both an acid and a base and has an overall neutral effect in terms of taste. Recipes that call for baking powder often call for other neutral-tasting ingredients, such as milk. Baking powder is a common ingredient in cakes and biscuits.

Substituting in Recipes

You can substitute baking powder in place of baking soda (you'll need more baking powder and it may affect the taste), but you can't use baking soda when a recipe calls for baking powder. Baking soda by itself lacks the acidity to make a cake rise. However, you can make your own baking powder if you have baking soda and cream of tartar. Simply mix two parts cream of tartar with one part baking soda.
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#26 Rachel--24

 
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Posted 19 April 2006 - 09:51 AM

You can substitute baking powder in place of baking soda (you'll need more baking powder and it may affect the taste), but you can't use baking soda when a recipe calls for baking powder. Baking soda by itself lacks the acidity to make a cake rise. However, you can make your own baking powder if you have baking soda and cream of tartar. Simply mix two parts cream of tartar with one part baking soda.


Thanks ChelsE!!

Obviously I've been doing it all wrong.
No wonder why I broke my Mom's fork in half yesterday when I was cutting my pancakes! :ph34r:
:lol: :lol: She was blaming it on my gluten-free baking...the nerve!
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#27 Jnkmnky

 
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Posted 19 April 2006 - 09:52 AM

Thanks ChelsE!!

Obviously I've been doing it all wrong.
No wonder why I broke my Mom's fork in half yesterday when I was cutting my pancakes! :ph34r:
:lol: :lol: She was blaming it on my gluten-free baking...the nerve!


LOL! :lol:
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#28 tarnalberry

 
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Posted 19 April 2006 - 10:04 AM

Acid/base chemistry will get ya every time!
As for the xanthum gum, where does the corn come in? I know the substance itself comes from the cell wall of a bacteria. Is the bacteria grown on corn?
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#29 Green12

 
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Posted 19 April 2006 - 10:42 AM

On the topic of baking powder....is it necessary for baking? I'm new at baking and I stopped using the powder because I just felt like it was "bad" for some reason. Everytime I used it I felt worse so I just used baking soda instead. My stuff doesnt come out great but its edible and I'm not picky so I eat it no matter what. What purpose does the tiny bit of baking powder in a recipe serve? Is it gonna make a huge difference in the final outcome?
Julie, I actually read that thread which is what put the thought in my head to begin with. I checked out the corn site and learned about the xanthan gum and all the other stuff...it kind of all made sense when I went back to my food diaries and started looking at the ingredients of what I'd been eating. I think I might email her....she seems to be the expert on corn stuff. :)



You are right about Simply V, you should contact her because she has lots of information and was offering her help and support. She would be an excellent resource.

About the baking powder and using cream of tartar as a substitute- just a thought, but give it a test run and see how it affects you. You seem to be as sensitive as I am to different foods and substances and when I tried cream of tartar it did not agree with me- but you might be totally fine with it. If that is not the case however, I found this information on a cooking website on substituting cream of tartar:

If you are beating eggs whites and don't have cream of tartar, you can substitute white vinegar (in the same ratio as cream of tartar, generally 1/8 teaspoon per egg white). It is a little more problematic to find a substitute for cream of tartar in baking projects. White vinegar or lemon juice, in the ratio of 3 times the amount of cream of tartar called for, will provide the right amount of acid for most recipes. But that amount of liquid may cause other problems in the recipe, and bakers have found that cakes made with vinegar or lemon juice have a coarser grain and are more prone to shrinking than those made with cream of tartar.


Not exactly foolproof for baking but might get the job done if you can't tolerate cream of tartar.


Acid/base chemistry will get ya every time!
As for the xanthum gum, where does the corn come in? I know the substance itself comes from the cell wall of a bacteria. Is the bacteria grown on corn?



I'm not exactly sure, but from some of what I read yesterday at the Avoiding Corn group at delphi, corn, or a corn derivative, is somehow used in the manufacturing process of the xanthum gum.
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#30 penguin

 
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Posted 19 April 2006 - 10:54 AM

If that is not the case however, I found this information on a cooking website on substituting cream of tartar:

If you are beating eggs whites and don't have cream of tartar, you can substitute white vinegar (in the same ratio as cream of tartar, generally 1/8 teaspoon per egg white). It is a little more problematic to find a substitute for cream of tartar in baking projects. White vinegar or lemon juice, in the ratio of 3 times the amount of cream of tartar called for, will provide the right amount of acid for most recipes. But that amount of liquid may cause other problems in the recipe, and bakers have found that cakes made with vinegar or lemon juice have a coarser grain and are more prone to shrinking than those made with cream of tartar.
Not exactly foolproof for baking but might get the job done if you can't tolerate cream of tartar.


You can find powdered citric acid and powdered ascorbic acid, maybe that could be subsitituted for the vinegar in baking projects?
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Alright, don't worry even if things end up a bit too heavy
We'll all float on, alright
Well we'll float on good news is on the way...




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