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#1 Guest_Robb Wolf_*

 
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Posted 07 June 2006 - 02:09 PM

Hi Everyone!

My name is Robb Wolf. I’m a strength & conditioning coach in Northern California. I, my mother and most of her side of our Scott/Irish family have celiac. I am a former research biochemist with special interest in lipid metabolism. You folks have a great community here; I’d love to participate! If you have any questions I’d love to help fuel your celiac athletes.
Robb
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#2 CarlaB

 
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Posted 07 June 2006 - 02:15 PM

Welcome!

You didn't mention whether you had it, too. Not that it matters, there are others here who don't but have family member who do, so I'm just curious.

I think it's the weight training that kept me from looking very sickly when I was losing so much weight, this is a good niche for you. There have been several threads on how to gain weight where exercise is brought up, and also during how to lose discussions. It will be good to have a "resident expert." :D
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gluten-free 12/05

diagnosed with Lyme Disease 12/06

#3 Guhlia

 
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Posted 07 June 2006 - 02:21 PM

Welcome!
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~Angie~

Gluten free since May 2004

#4 inquirer

 
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Posted 07 June 2006 - 03:45 PM

Great to have you join us. The more information the better!
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#5 pturse

 
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Posted 08 June 2006 - 02:17 PM

Hi Everyone!

My name is Robb Wolf. I’m a strength & conditioning coach in Northern California. I, my mother and most of her side of our Scott/Irish family have celiac. I am a former research biochemist with special interest in lipid metabolism. You folks have a great community here; I’d love to participate! If you have any questions I’d love to help fuel your celiac athletes.
Robb


Welcome Robb! I am also in Northern California. Since going gluten free I have gained quite a bit of weight. Weight that wasnot totally necessary. A few lbs were fine but now I am pushing more than 15. I am a runner who has transitioned in triathlons the past year or so. I am doing my first 1/2 Ironman in Aug.

I want to do better in all portions of the tri but I find these extra 15 lbs or so are weighing me down. I know I have developed some muscle but I know I have some "non-muscle" to lose and the more I train, the hungrier I get. Any suggestions? I have stopped eating the gluten free foods (except for a slice of bread occasionally). I normally do corn tortillas. My one addiction is sugar though. I can't stay away. I know I must be missing something in my diet to cause these unbelievable cravings. I have recently tried adding more protein (I am a vegan too) to each meal.

Is there anything that will help my metabolism. I really feel like it is gone. I am 29 and a female by the way. Thanks!
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#6 jenvan

 
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Posted 09 June 2006 - 04:49 AM

Robb-
Hi! If you are willing to help, I'm sure there are some athletes here who would love some *fueling* tips. Sometimes lack of energy can't be helped at the beginning stages of healing, but oftentimes it can be improved. Here have been quite a few threads on this topic, here is one example, if you are interested...

http://www.glutenfre...9&mode=threaded
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~~~~~~~
Jen
Indianapolis, IN

gluten-free since Feb 2005
dairy-free

#7 Guest_Robb Wolf_*

 
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Posted 09 June 2006 - 11:59 AM

Wow! Thanks for the warm welcome everyone! I was diagnosed with celiac in ’98 but it was not until the other day that I thought of looking for some gluten-free/celiac sites. Sooo much lost time!

Pturse-

Here is my $0.02. I’ve found it very rare that eating vegan can sustain either favorable body composition or high-level athleticism. Now there are exceptions but this is where the law of averages comes in…in general how many people excel on a standard high carb, low protein, and low fat diet? Again this is just my opinion, but if you are eating vegan for “health” reasons I think your efforts may be counter productive. If it’s for political/philosophical reasons then you may need to evaluate (assuming what I am saying is accurate) if you are willing to take a hit on your health for the sake of the ideology. If this is in any way sounding hoity-tooity or condescending please send me a psychic kick to the fanny and I will take a time out!

The sugar cravings are likely a result of meals that have too many carbs and not enough fat and protein. If you follow the pattern I’ve seen (and personally experienced) you eat a meal, perhaps rice, lentils and some veggies and in 30-45 min you are ravenous for sugar. As a comparison try eating a meal that consists of 5-7oz of tofu stir-fried with some chopped veggies, 2-3 TBL. Olive oil and a handful of nuts. Lots of protein and fat? Yes indeed and you will not have a carb roller coaster form that meal. Give a few meals like this a shot and see how you feel. If you must remain vegan then you will need to shift food composition in this direction. When you do you will lean out very easily and sugar cravings should become infrequent. My main concern with this approach is a lack of food variety, particularly your protein sources. You are relegated to tofu, temph (obviously NO seitan!!!) and rice protein powder. Not much variety and this is just asking for food allergies to the chronically consumed soy foods. Either way I’d be happy to help you get this dialed in. Just try the higher protein/fat meals so you can critically evaluate what I’m talking about. Nothing instructs like personal experience! Let me know how that goes. Lets look to find a nutritional strategy that will help you to lean out and then we can tinker with your training.

Jen-
I’d love to help in this area anyway I can. Have you folks talked about the use of glutamine to help repair the microvili? Coconut oil and or MCT oil can be an option for a dense calorie source during intestinal healing. Since the brush border of the intestines is damaged it can make fat absorption difficult. MCT’s (medium chain triglycerides) and coconut oil can be helpful in this regard. Supplemental fish oil is very important once normal digestion is returned as folks are chronically essential fatty acid deficient due to long standing intestinal absorption issues.

If y’all know all this stuff my apologies for completely re-inventing the wheel!
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#8 jenvan

 
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Posted 09 June 2006 - 12:15 PM

Robb-
Interesting on the fatty acids... Was reading about a deficiency linked to depression (fairly prevalant here--also for various reasons).

L-glutamine has been discussed here, althought not as much recently. But there are a few here who do take it on a consistent basis and feel they notice improvement. Could that be incidental, I've wondered at times? I did take it initally, but not for very long. It has taken me since Feb of 2005 to just now start getting the old energy back... Coconut oil and MCT...I'm sure some here would be interested in that. Although--after healing begins many of us are more concerned with stopping the gain :lol:

Out of curiousity--what was your area of research or focus? Anything you could describe without overwhelming us "normal" folk ? :D
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~~~~~~~
Jen
Indianapolis, IN

gluten-free since Feb 2005
dairy-free

#9 pturse

 
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Posted 09 June 2006 - 12:51 PM

Wow, Robb, thank you very much for that ".02 reply." I really appreciate it.

To answer some of your questions, I am not vegan for political or religious reasons. Mainly because 1. I am allergic to dairy (that was discovered when I was about 5 years old) and 2. I just never really "liked" the taste of meat and so at 16, decided to stop eating it. However, when I first went gluten free a few years back (I have been on and off this diet so many times, trying now for good). I happened to be in Maui at one crucial point in the diet when there was nothing for me to eat, but they had fresh Ahi Tuna Steaks. My hubby and I never liked sea food but both agreed to give it a try. Not bad. So I guess my "vegan" label should no longer apply, just so used to saying it so that restaurants don't mess up & give me cheese or beef. I can safely say, that now I indulge in a little fish (maybe once every other month) and usually Ahi. It makes eating out easier but I cannot do it in large amounts, I think my system isn't quite used to having that type of protein.

I agree with your comments about the sugar. I have just started reading a Sugar Addict's Road to Recovery and she recommends a little protein at every meal, especially breakfast. Also, no snacks and lots of water. So, I am giving that a shot. I am trying eat Ahi more frequently and I have started eating eggs (or rather egg whites and egg beaters) more as well. Laying off the carby foods unless I have a big training session or a race. My one road block is I am around the sugar a lot (i.e. at work) so I am doing my best to not be around it as much (such as taking a route not past the "candy desk"). It isn't donuts or anything it's pure candy and not even chocolate.

I also think my brain to stomach indicator is um, broken. :P I need to learn to eat slowly. I am guilty of eating too quickly and often standing up.

I really appreciate all your advice and tips. My training has been going okay but for the amount that I do, I would think that I'd be losing a pound if not two. I am not worrying too much about it. Training time is not the time to try and lose weight. But I have been slightly dehydrated lately no matter how much water I consume.

I will try the higher protein/fat diet a little more. Too much fat doesn't sit well with my already sensitive stomach nor does too much protein. Baby steps. B)

Have a great weekend! It's been beautiful in Northern CA the past few days!
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#10 Guest_Robb Wolf_*

 
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Posted 09 June 2006 - 04:26 PM

Robb-
Interesting on the fatty acids... Was reading about a deficiency linked to depression (fairly prevalant here--also for various reasons).

L-glutamine has been discussed here, althought not as much recently. But there are a few here who do take it on a consistent basis and feel they notice improvement. Could that be incidental, I've wondered at times? I did take it initally, but not for very long. It has taken me since Feb of 2005 to just now start getting the old energy back... Coconut oil and MCT...I'm sure some here would be interested in that. Although--after healing begins many of us are more concerned with stopping the gain :lol:

Out of curiousity--what was your area of research or focus? Anything you could describe without overwhelming us "normal" folk ? :D


Hey Jen!
If one becomes deficient in n-3 fatty acids (omega 3 fatty acids), like those found in fish oil, virtually every system is affected and not for the better. Most people are not getting enough n-3's due to an imbalance of n-3/n-6 fatty acids that is created because our meat and dairy are fed grains such as corn that are very high in n-6 fatty acids. Grass Fed meat is a great alternative if one can find/afford it. Short of that taking 3-8g of fish oil per day will bring things back to normal. Costco's Kirkland brand fish oil is excellent quality and very inexpensive.

L-glutamine is helpful in that it can be a preferred energy source for the cells of the intestinal epithelium but these cells actually repair/grow fairly quickly. The gut lining can recover fairly quickly but one is typically in a state of systemic inflammation that takes many months to heal. This may be some of "drop-off" in efficacy of the glutamine.

My area of research was broadly "nutritional biochemistry" but my main focus when I worked at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center was lipid metabolism. We were a support lab that studies the fatty acid profiles of study subjects and controls for many of the large studies like Shanghai, Nurses Health (follow-up) and a few others. I also did a research fellowship with Prof. Loren Cordain in the area of Paleolithic Diet research. Specifically I looked at small growth called skin tags and their relationship to chronically elevated insulin levels and potential predictive strength for epithelial cancers (breast, prostate, colon).

If you ever have insomnia I promise my rambling can fix it!


Wow, Robb, thank you very much for that ".02 reply." I really appreciate it.

To answer some of your questions, I am not vegan for political or religious reasons. Mainly because 1. I am allergic to dairy (that was discovered when I was about 5 years old) and 2. I just never really "liked" the taste of meat and so at 16, decided to stop eating it. However, when I first went gluten free a few years back (I have been on and off this diet so many times, trying now for good). I happened to be in Maui at one crucial point in the diet when there was nothing for me to eat, but they had fresh Ahi Tuna Steaks. My hubby and I never liked sea food but both agreed to give it a try. Not bad. So I guess my "vegan" label should no longer apply, just so used to saying it so that restaurants don't mess up & give me cheese or beef. I can safely say, that now I indulge in a little fish (maybe once every other month) and usually Ahi. It makes eating out easier but I cannot do it in large amounts, I think my system isn't quite used to having that type of protein.

I agree with your comments about the sugar. I have just started reading a Sugar Addict's Road to Recovery and she recommends a little protein at every meal, especially breakfast. Also, no snacks and lots of water. So, I am giving that a shot. I am trying eat Ahi more frequently and I have started eating eggs (or rather egg whites and egg beaters) more as well. Laying off the carby foods unless I have a big training session or a race. My one road block is I am around the sugar a lot (i.e. at work) so I am doing my best to not be around it as much (such as taking a route not past the "candy desk"). It isn't donuts or anything it's pure candy and not even chocolate.

I also think my brain to stomach indicator is um, broken. :P I need to learn to eat slowly. I am guilty of eating too quickly and often standing up.

I really appreciate all your advice and tips. My training has been going okay but for the amount that I do, I would think that I'd be losing a pound if not two. I am not worrying too much about it. Training time is not the time to try and lose weight. But I have been slightly dehydrated lately no matter how much water I consume.

I will try the higher protein/fat diet a little more. Too much fat doesn't sit well with my already sensitive stomach nor does too much protein. Baby steps. B)

Have a great weekend! It's been beautiful in Northern CA the past few days!


If fish works you can try some options like Trader Joes caned Wiled Alaskan Salmon. Great stuff. Dice some romaine, put 1/2 the can on and cover with grated ginger, grated carrots and some sesame oil...pretty darn yummy! Trader Joes also carries some small Portuguese sardines (don't run!) Bella Olahao. Again really yummy and these fish are much lower on the food chain than tuna so issues of mercury toxicity are removed. If you are doing eggs I'd try to get "omega 3" enriched eggs. They may go by the name "EPA/DHA" eggs or n-3 (omega three). Costco has a super good quality n-3 egg in an 18pack. Eat them yolk and all!!

Let me know how this goes and any way I can help. You are right! N-California has been spectacular the past few days. I hope the weather has not set us up for a fall when it turns hot!

Take care and have a great weekend.
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#11 whitball

 
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Posted 09 June 2006 - 04:49 PM

Hi Rob, welcome to the forum. I am excited to have someone with your expertise on this forum and one who is willing to offer assistance. In the early 80's, I was a college athlete. I am now 45 years old and today I ran for the first time in 12 years. I have spent the last twelve years completely unable to run, barely able to lift weights and experienced an intense muscle failure even upon acceration during the first few minutes of biking, walking or walking up stairs. I have been told that I have a metabolic myopathy in the past and was recently diagnosed with celiac disease. I have lost thirteen pounds since february and am excited to continue with weight loss. My question is, how do I get myself back to a regular running/weight lifting routine after so many years, what can I do to control my ravenous appetite after exercise and how can I increase stamina with diet? Thanks for your help. Tara
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Positive biopsy, positive blood test in 2/2006
Muscle biopsy in thigh in 2004 to confirm metabolic myopathy (found denervated nerves)
Interstitial cystitis diagnosis 2004
Hysterectomy 2003
3 for c-sections, 2 laparoscopies to remove abdominal adhesions
Abnormal heart beat when tired or glutened

#12 Kaycee

 
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Posted 09 June 2006 - 07:41 PM

I don't know if I am the exception to the rule or not.
I have been gluten free for five months.
I have not suffered undue tiredness, even before my diagnosis.
I have noticed a difference in my appetite.
Before I used to be so ravenously hungry, and I ate bread, and that probably kept the cycle of hunger going, and I was overweight. I would do an early morning walk with a friend for 45 minutes and then walk the dog at night for another half hour. So I was active, but not overly. I had lost about 12 kilos before dianosis. That was hard to loose.

Now that I can't have bread, I do occassionally have gluten free bread, but mainly have rice or corn crackers, but not a lot of them. The rest of the time, I fill up on fruit and veges and maybe a couple of servings of milk, and a good helping of protein every day, usually meat or cans of tuna or salmon.
So the diet is pretty varied, forgot to mention, cereal for breakfast with yoghurt, it would be a rice porridge or a museli. I try to avoid preservatives, colours and flavours as I don't think they agree with me. This diet I feel suits me, I am happy on it and it is filling, and I don't feel like I am filling myself up on crap. I would never have thought this way last year!

I find that most gluten free products aimed at us, are usually very high in fats and are probably no better than there counterparts in the gluten world, so I avoid them most of the time. I do have my treats.
What has amazed me is that I am no longer have that hunger to eat nonstop, I am not so worried about loosing weight, even though I have not lost any since diagnosis, I am exactly the same weight. But I feel more in control of my weight and what I eat. I get a bit worried that I might get bored with the food. Last week I ditched my raw carrot as a snack. Have had too many of them. But we are in fruit and vege heaven here in NZ. There is an orchard up the road, and the fruit and veges are wonderful.

I still walk every day. You can't tell the dog not to walk, she would cry non-stop until I walk her. And my friend would drag me out of bed if I did not walk with her. Talking about bed, I sleep a lot better now, unless I eat chocolate.

My energy levels are the same, maybe a little better, so I feel I am doing okay, but I can see room for improvement, and once I get down to 10 stone I will be a lot better off, and that is only another two stone away.
Cathy
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#13 BRUMI1968

 
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Posted 09 June 2006 - 07:54 PM

Wow, Robb, thank you very much for that ".02 reply." I really appreciate it.

To answer some of your questions, I am not vegan for political or religious reasons. Mainly because 1. I am allergic to dairy (that was discovered when I was about 5 years old) and 2. I just never really "liked" the taste of meat and so at 16, decided to stop eating it. However, when I first went gluten free a few years back (I have been on and off this diet so many times, trying now for good). I happened to be in Maui at one crucial point in the diet when there was nothing for me to eat, but they had fresh Ahi Tuna Steaks. My hubby and I never liked sea food but both agreed to give it a try. Not bad. So I guess my "vegan" label should no longer apply, just so used to saying it so that restaurants don't mess up & give me cheese or beef. I can safely say, that now I indulge in a little fish (maybe once every other month) and usually Ahi. It makes eating out easier but I cannot do it in large amounts, I think my system isn't quite used to having that type of protein.

I agree with your comments about the sugar. I have just started reading a Sugar Addict's Road to Recovery and she recommends a little protein at every meal, especially breakfast. Also, no snacks and lots of water. So, I am giving that a shot. I am trying eat Ahi more frequently and I have started eating eggs (or rather egg whites and egg beaters) more as well. Laying off the carby foods unless I have a big training session or a race. My one road block is I am around the sugar a lot (i.e. at work) so I am doing my best to not be around it as much (such as taking a route not past the "candy desk"). It isn't donuts or anything it's pure candy and not even chocolate.

I also think my brain to stomach indicator is um, broken. :P I need to learn to eat slowly. I am guilty of eating too quickly and often standing up.

I really appreciate all your advice and tips. My training has been going okay but for the amount that I do, I would think that I'd be losing a pound if not two. I am not worrying too much about it. Training time is not the time to try and lose weight. But I have been slightly dehydrated lately no matter how much water I consume.

I will try the higher protein/fat diet a little more. Too much fat doesn't sit well with my already sensitive stomach nor does too much protein. Baby steps. B)

Have a great weekend! It's been beautiful in Northern CA the past few days!



Not to be a downer, but watch your intake of tuna - it is loaded with mercury. You might want to try some other fish like salmon - less mercury altogether. It used to be advised that pregnant women and children limit themselves to one can of tuna a day; now they say that for all women. Also, tuna steaks have even more mercury than cans of tuna.

Did you have any mahi mahi in Hawaii? I think it is a snapper. Yum!
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#14 Green12

 
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Posted 10 June 2006 - 09:10 AM

My area of research was broadly "nutritional biochemistry" but my main focus when I worked at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center was lipid metabolism. We were a support lab that studies the fatty acid profiles of study subjects and controls for many of the large studies like Shanghai, Nurses Health (follow-up) and a few others. I also did a research fellowship with Prof. Loren Cordain in the area of Paleolithic Diet research. Specifically I looked at small growth called skin tags and their relationship to chronically elevated insulin levels and potential predictive strength for epithelial cancers (breast, prostate, colon).


Welcome Robb, I am also excited to have someone with all of your knowledge be a part of this forum!!

I noticed you mentioned skin tags. I just had a larger one removed this last week. I still have several really small ones in various places on my body, and they seem to run in my family on my mom's side, as well as diabetes. When I have my blood sugar tests taken I am always within normal range, the fasting level as well as the extended hour one where you drink the sugar solution throughout.

As far as my diet, it's a little tricky since I have multiple food intolerances, and for the most part I just don't have enough to vary and eat. All starches and grains make me swell up with enormous amounts of fluid retention that eventually will turn into weight gain. But if I take the starches/grains out I feel like a walking zombie, literally no energy whatsoever, losing a pound a day, and my bowels won't move for anywhere up to 7-15 days. This is the pattern I have been stuck in, and battling, for about 14 years. Either severe edema and weight gain with bowel movements, or weight loss and no energy without bowel movements.

This has really interfered with my fitness level. I had always been an athlete. I swam competitively for years, and was always really active with crosstraining- running, hiking, weights, aerobics. Now, I am either too swollen or I don't have any energy to burn.

Any advice or suggestions you might have would be greatly appreciated.
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#15 inquirer

 
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Posted 10 June 2006 - 11:05 AM

Rob, how do you prepare the sardines? I've tried buying sardines a couple of time but wasn't able to get past the yuck factor. Your salmon recipe looked good.

Have you studied coconut oil much? My husband is currently taking it to reduce inflammation for autoimmune disease and for a yeast infection. One doctor thought it might cause inflammation instead of calming it but I'm not sure she's up on her research.
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