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Baking Gluten-free
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9 posts in this topic

I have Roben Ryberg's Gluten-free Kitchen recipe book and I've attempted to make many things from there. My problem is the texture of everything I try comes out way too dry and bakes up either almost raw or dry and crumbly. What am I doing wrong???

Signed,

Mom of teen

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I don't have that particular book, so I can't comment on their recipes, but I'm a lifelong baker just learning the gluten free ropes, & here are my thoughts:

Gluten is the protein in wheat flour that binds the starches together, helps them rise & keeps them from crumbling. Since we Celiacs are dependent on flours without this type of protein, we need to compensate by adding binding substances, like xanthan gum, eggs, & such.

Rice flour is very low in protein & tends to be especially dry & crumbly. If your recipes don't call for other flours (potato starch & tapioca, for instance) blended with the rice flour, the results will be as you describe.

If you are baking bread, sorghum & millet flours are really good. Also garfava flour leads to a nice moist result if you don't have a problem with the (very mild) bean flavor. All are higher-protein than rice.

Often there is more liquid in gluten free doughs, especially bread doughs, & the baking time is very different from that of wheat breads you may be used to working with. I find it helps to test early & not count on the timing in recipes, but rely on touch & toothpick-tests.

Bette Hagman's books have been a great help to me, also Annalise Roberts.

What in particular are you trying to bake? I may be able to share a recipe that has worked for me.

I'm a baking maniac, so if you want to compare notes, I'll be more than happy to share what I've learned.

Happy baking!

Leah

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Dear queenofhearts,

thank you for your reply - I have been using potato flour and cornstarch and I have been trying to bake all sorts of things. My 16 year old and I have been told not to eat gluten so we have been trying different recipes for awhile. I consider myself a fairly accomplished cook/baker but this gluten-free has me stumped. This is the only cookbook I have attempted. I have gotten helpful hints from friends who are gluten-free like melting the shortening, combining all dry ingredients together then adding the wet and still my muffins, focaccia bread, banana bread, etc., come out dry. Even the batter seems incorrect going into the pan - the book will say that the dough will be runny or very wet and mine is always way too dry and crumbly even before baking. I've thrown away a lot of food which is frustrating. I am just trying to make this as easy for a teenager as I can. I appreciate your response and would love to hear from you again!

juliedel

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Dear queenofhearts,

thank you for your reply - I have been using potato flour and cornstarch and I have been trying to bake all sorts of things.

I've flipped through the Ryberg book and I think the problem is that you're using potato FLOUR. She uses potato STARCH. Potato flour and starch are two very different products (although the starch is sometimes referred to as potato starch flour). The flour has a wheat flour texture, it looks like flour, but the starch is very fine and brilliant white, not such a dull white. It looks almost like cornstarch. Potato flour is rarely used in flour mixes, or in very small quantities.

I've made the Ryberg bread sticks - they are amazing. If you are having a problem keeping things moist, try adding a couple tablespoons or 1/4 cup applesauce or plain yogurt to your ingredients. I do that with a banana bread recipe I use and it really helps.

Good luck.

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Dear 2Boys4me,

Thank you for your reply - I was told potato flour and potato starch were the same thing. The potat flour I have is very fine and white - it's not clumpy as the corn starch can be. It doesn't look like flour at all. I will try the applesauce or yogurt trick. Perhaps you are right about the flour/starch. I will investigate.

THank you!

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Dear 2Boys4me,

Thank you for your reply - I was told potato flour and potato starch were the same thing. The potat flour I have is very fine and white - it's not clumpy as the corn starch can be. It doesn't look like flour at all. I will try the applesauce or yogurt trick. Perhaps you are right about the flour/starch. I will investigate.

THank you!

She is very correct.......... here is some info on the subject :

Potato Flour

A type of flour produced from cooked, dried, and ground potatoes. It is used as an ingredient in potato based recipes to enhance the potato flavor and is often mixed with other types of flour for baking breads and rolls. It is also used as a thickener for soups, gravies, and sauces. Potato flour is often confused with potato starch, but potato flour is produced from the entire dehydrated potato whereas potato starch is produced from the starch only.

http://www.hormel.com/kitchen/glossary.asp...3857&catitemid=

Potato starch is not potato flour. Potato flour is dehydrated potatoes ground into powder. Potato starch is the results of an extraction process removing the starch only from the potato.

Potato starch finds uses in fast food, sweets, sausages, tablets and paper products. In home use, it is used to thicken soups and gravies. Liquids thickened with potato starch should never be boiled.

Potato starch has no gluten. It is used in recipes for those who are gluten intolerant.

[url=http://www.barryfarm.com/nutri_info/thickeners/potatostarch.html]http://www.barryfarm.com/nutri_info/thicke...tatostarch.html[/url

Hope that helps!

-Jessica

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angel_jd1

Perhaps that's why everything is too thick! Thank you and I will try to purchase only potato starch.

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I think the potato flour is your problem too. Both are useful but not interchangeable.

Hope that solves your crumbles!

Leah

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I think the potato flour is your problem too. Both are useful but not interchangeable.

Hope that solves your crumbles!

Leah

Aloha Queen of hearts,

I would love to get a (good) bread recipe from you using the millet flour etc.

one that wasn't dry and toasted well. Thank You, ><>suz<><

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