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Need To Train My Brain


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29 replies to this topic

#16 lovegrov

 
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Posted 28 June 2004 - 11:43 AM

Every July 4 we block off our street and have a block party along with the huge potluck. I was really depressed about this the first year but I took some good stuff and a few very understanding neighbors talked to me and made something gluten-free. In addition, there's one other neighbor who eats gluten-free because she's gluten intolerant.

Now I use this block party as an excuse to go all out and make stuff I don't usually. I buy three pork butts, put dry rub on, and smoke them the day before, which takes at least 12 hours. I make two kinds of homemade BBQ sauce. People now look for the pulled pork and they always wipe it out. The deviled eggs have fresh dill and sometimes sun-dried tomato and smoked salmon. We also make either slaw or potato salad. Sometimes I make a gluten-free dessert but I wasn't a big dessert person even before celiac disease. Sometimes I also grill some marinated vegetables. It's a lot of work but I actually look forward to it.

One note on the meats with flavors or solutions. I've talked to the USDA and so have others, and we've all gottent the same answer. If wheat or barley is a part of "flavors" or solutions in raw, fresh meats, the wheat or barley must be clearly listed because it adds nutritional value.

Here's a web page along with an 800 number and an e-mail contact.

http://www.fsis.usda.../flavorings.htm

richard
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#17 terri

 
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Posted 28 June 2004 - 12:13 PM

I've always loved to cook but never could bake. I've found that I've had to make only a few modifications on my cooking. Sure, there are some recipes I chucked (for example all those Bisquick easy ones) but for the most part I've always made most things from scratch which works well for us. Now, though, I am going to learn to bake because I WILL have my cookies with the cherries and nuts on them at Christmas! I've got 6 months to prepare!. For me the hardest part of being gluten free is social. Dining out is a chore. Every bite I take I wonder if it will "get me". Guess I'll get over that with time.... Just remember things could be so much worse! At least we don't have to inject ourselves with insulin or monitor our blood sugar or go for dialysis or even worse, take chemotherapy. At least we're not in a wheelchair with no control over our muscles or so many other things that could be wrong. I think we're so lucky to have something that can be controlled by diet.
Just my thoughts,
Terri
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Terri
Northern Virginia

gluten-free since March 27, 2004

#18 plantime

 
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Posted 28 June 2004 - 12:33 PM

Thank you, Richard! I didn't even know there was a number I could call about that! I bet your block party is a blast!

We are fortunate, in that we can take of ourselves just by watching what we eat. Compared to the treatments for other problems, ours is relatively easy and cheap. I know the food costs more, but not as much as some medications!
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Dessa

The Lord bless you and keep you; the Lord make His face shine upon you and be gracious to you." Numbers 6:24-25

#19 Guest_NitaB_*

 
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Posted 28 June 2004 - 01:02 PM

Terri,
That is totally wonderful! How nice for someone to think and plan for you! I'm glad you had a good time!

And Dana, lucky you, also! I'm glad YOUR friend was so thoughtful. Too bad your daughter's friend's mother wasn't more considerate! Shame, for her even thinking your daughter couldn't have the root beer!

My daughters have gotten pretty good about trying to see that there will be stuff for me to eat. Others just expect me to fix what I can eat, and take it to a barbecue. Sat. at a picninc, I just ate a hamburger patty, fruit, and a few chips! Of course, I didn't starve! At my family reunion, where I could take heated food, I had brought beans and wienies, fruit, and had some ham.

I agree, the social part is the hardest! Next weekend is a family barbecue again, for the holiday. I'm sure I will have to take stuff I can eat, or won't have many choices! :rolleyes:
Nita
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#20 Pegster

 
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Posted 28 June 2004 - 05:20 PM

So, Richard, where is your block and what time do you want us all there? :lol: :lol:
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PEGGY
Positive DH biopsy 4/19/04

#21 zippyten

 
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Posted 28 June 2004 - 06:09 PM

Dana,
I thought your two contrasting stories were very interesting, and very familiar. Thanks for sharing them. I think the depth of people's sensitivities to others' dietary needs have a lot to do with both the kind of people they are, deep down, and also their own experiences (for example, it's probably no coincidence that your friend who has an allergy of her own is sensitive to what you & your daughter can and can't eat).

I have to admit that prior to my own diagnosis, while I was considerate of my father-in-law's stringent low-fat requirements for his heart disease, I regularly brought desserts to my in-laws filled with nuts despite one sister-in-law being allergic to them. Even though I don't see her all that often, I should've remembered. So I try not to hold it against others too much, but as you said, when it's people who know you really well and spend a lot of time with you, you do kind of expect a little bit of heightened awareness.

It reminds me of very good friends of ours, who continually invite me and my kids to join them for pizza they are ordering in (at least probably 10 times since I've been diagnosed!) and when I say, well that's fine for the kids but I'll have to find something else since I can't have pizza, they always say -- oh, right, we forgot. On the other hand, I have a close friend who invites us over often for completely gluten-free meals prepared from scratch, and she goes to a great deal of trouble to make them really good and really safe for me.

My condition has made me try to be more attuned to what other people are dealing with in their own lives, and to try and understand them whenever I can, so maybe that's the silver lining. In the meantime, we all just have to appreciate kindness wherever we find it...
Zippyten
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#22 lovegrov

 
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Posted 29 June 2004 - 05:12 AM

Well Pegster, if you can get to Roanoke, Va.....

richard
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#23 catfish

 
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Posted 29 June 2004 - 10:15 AM

Training your brain is a great way to put it! I'm a stay at home dad and I take care of my little girls, and they are always trying to feed my a cookie or put a fruit loop in my mouth. It's great that they want to share and I'm so used to just humoring them that now I have to catch myself each time and say, "Oops, nope, can't eat that!" Eventually I will get more used to it I'm sure but it's still so new to me that my brain hasn't quite adjusted yet. :huh:
On the other hand I'm dreaming at night about cooking gluten-free foods now so maybe it's starting to sink in... ;)
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#24 sunshine264

 
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Posted 03 July 2004 - 05:24 AM

Hang in there bratcat, it IS overwhelming at first, but trust me, this message board really helps. I was diagnosed in May of this year, and after a week of tears, decided that ok...this WAS what I needed to do. Thank God, I have a wonderful family and friends that are helping me through this. Even my 11 year old son will read a label, and if he finds something in it, he tells me I can't have it!!
Still, I think not a day goes by that I don't read something in one of my books, or on the web that is teaching me what I can/can't eat.
As far as going places...I make my own flatbreads, hamburger rolls, and dressings, and if I'm going to a picnic, I just bring them. We've even had "deli day" at work, and I've brought my own bread and mayo and TOLD them to make my sandwich on my bread! They did it without question.
The key is learn all you can, realize that there will be mistakes on occaision, but given time, you will know what they are. And don't be afraid to stand up for yourself and your health. Stop worrying about what other people will think if you ask for a reasonable accommodation....
Good luck, and we are here if you need us



Eileen
gluten-free since 5/10/04 B)
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#25 celiac3270

 
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Posted 03 July 2004 - 06:18 AM

Training your brain is a great way to put it! I'm a stay at home dad and I take care of my little girls, and they are always trying to feed my a cookie or put a fruit loop in my mouth. It's great that they want to share and I'm so used to just humoring them that now I have to catch myself each time and say, "Oops, nope, can't eat that!" Eventually I will get more used to it I'm sure but it's still so new to me that my brain hasn't quite adjusted yet. 
On the other hand I'm dreaming at night about cooking gluten-free foods now so maybe it's starting to sink in... 


Oooh...that must be difficult....it's easy enough to make mistakes on your own without having someone handing you foods :) ....it does take awhile to get used to....at first you'll read every label 2 or 3 times to make sure you didn't misread it, and then, eventually, you'll know exactly what you can and can't have...and you will only have to read labels for prodcucts that are new to you. In addition, in the beginning I would automatically move towards food....now I immediately know that something's not good so I don't go near it. Eating seems to be somewhat automatic: people graviate towards food or eat whatever is there without thinking about it. With celiac disease you just need to make eating a manual thing where you consciously think of what you can eat...and then eventually you will automatically stay away from foods that you know contain gluten.....my apologies for a long-winded piece on eating.....it may, by this point, have no relevance to catfish's post and I don't know if this will make sense to anyone else....... :( By the way, I never had those dreams (but have heard of others who have had them), but it seems like you're making things like eating and cooking something you think about, rather than, as I mentioned before, semi-automatic operations. I hope this makes sense...... :unsure:


-celiac3270
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#26 kalo

 
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Posted 03 July 2004 - 07:34 AM

I have a bad habit where I go through periods of getting up at night and raiding the kitchen. Especially when my upper neck (atlas) is out and puts pressure on the brain. Fortunately I started doing this again this week but haven't touched the chese (casein allergic). Instead I go for the corn chips and salsa. Wish I could stop it as I know it's not good for my digestion.
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Hugs, Carol B Enterolab diagnosed gluten sensitive and casein allergic June 04

#27 minnie

 
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Posted 04 July 2004 - 09:32 PM

Stay away from the root beer soda it may not be gulten free,most are made from yeast. :unsure:



MINNIE :)
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#28 Guest_NitaB_*

 
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Posted 04 July 2004 - 11:59 PM

Minnie,
Thanks for the reminder about yeast! I think it's been in some things, and I couldn't remember for sure it was bad! I'm beginning to think I may not have bad food reactions, until I'm stressed, or have a lot of gluten! It appears that some doesn't make me feel ill. Hmmmmmmm, will have to check labels closer!
Nita
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#29 lovegrov

 
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Posted 05 July 2004 - 06:14 AM

Yeast is gluten-free. And many root beers are gluten-free.

richard
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#30 dana_g

 
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Posted 05 July 2004 - 08:55 AM

Richard, how was your gluten-free Fourth of July party?
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Gloriously gluten-free--Dana




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