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Anyone Not Super Careful About Cross Contamination


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27 replies to this topic

#16 EddieJP125

 
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Posted 11 August 2004 - 09:51 AM

I am very careful. we use a lot of paper plates. My kids do not use the toaster oven anymore.....if they do they use foil in it.... they like to heat stuff up in the Microwave on a plate....

my 11 year old is very obsessive about being careful. He Washes his hands constantly and doesnt like gluten foods near him......but he saw what happened to his Dad....so he is entitled.

Please be Careful!!!

hi Dawn itz none of my business but u got me a lil worried more and more about cross contamination...wat happened to your husband?...is he a Celiac too?...email me if u wish...Eddiejp125@aol.com
thankx
eddie
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#17 pturse

 
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Posted 11 August 2004 - 10:42 AM

I am not that careful either. I have been gluten free for about a year. I still have some ups and downs but I don't always attribute it to gluten. I share a toaster oven and I even sometimes use the same peanut butter. I even eat oats and don't feel bad . . . I know I know I could be doing damage but until the tests come back bad, I am going to enjoy what I can. I also drink Amstel Light Beer which is a totally wheat free beer and according to the company, what ever little malt is in the beer is burned off during the process. Each person is different. It's just a matter of finding where your problem areas are.
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#18 lovegrov

 
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Posted 11 August 2004 - 10:58 AM

If you're sharing a toaster oven (which means you are getting crumbs on your stuff), sharing peanut butter (which certainly has bread crums in it), and drinking Amstel Light, which is not gluten free no matter what the company says (every grain expert I've read agrees that brewing does not "burn off" the gluten), then it's no wonder you have ups and downs. I also know a person with celiac who has a slice of pizza every now and then, but it's not something I would recommend to others.

richard
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#19 pturse

 
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Posted 11 August 2004 - 11:05 AM

Well I don't any reaction from drinking Amstel and I know a few other Celiacs that do it too w/o a reaction. To each his own I guess. I believe the company and I believe my body.
I watch what I eat and I pick my own battles. For the most part, since I stopped being so extremely careful . . . I've felt 90% better than before the diet and even after I started the diet and was watching every single morsel area I put my food.
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#20 lovegrov

 
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Posted 11 August 2004 - 12:17 PM

Picking your own battles is fine but I have a hard time understanding what's so difficult about using a separate toaster oven or having your own jar of peanut butter to avoid glutne. What the heck is hard about that?

As for the bgeer, I just drink rum and other distilled spirits that I KNOW are gluten-free.

richard
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#21 celiac3270

 
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Posted 11 August 2004 - 01:55 PM

my 11 year old is very obsessive about being careful. He Washes his hands constantly and doesnt like gluten foods near him......


Sounds like me.... :D .....it drives my parents and my brother CRAZY.....I constantly wash my hands, as well, and I often try to stay away from someone eating gluten, stay away from any crumbs, I'm kinda a nut, but my mom is really accepting of it; after all, she says: "You're the one dealing with the symptoms and the pain, not me." Anyway, just wanted to say that that sounded exactly like me :lol:

-celiac3270 :D
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#22 celiac3270

 
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Posted 11 August 2004 - 02:00 PM

Every crumb, every little bit matters! It isn't that difficult to keep things separate; it just requires thinking and being conscious. I have my own PB jar, own cooking things (pot, frying pan, spatula, spoon, whisk, toaster oven). The toaster oven is really no big deal; it's a matter of investing a few dollars towards your health in the future. My toaster oven has a black exterior, the gluten one is white; it's really easy. Label your gluten-free jars with a sticker or use a permanant marker to write gluten-free on the cap......not too difficult, either. Regardless of how you feel, every crumb you ingest is hurting you.
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#23 EddieJP125

 
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Posted 12 August 2004 - 05:18 AM

Aren't we all at a big risk of getting cancer if we abuse the fact that we are Celiacs, and that we must adhere to a gluten-free diet?
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#24 lovegrov

 
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Posted 12 August 2004 - 05:48 AM

The risk of non-Hodgkins lymphoma is indeed higher but it still isn't a very big risk. You're still much more likely to get other types of cancer, heart disease, stroke etc.

richard
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#25 rattaway

 
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Posted 12 August 2004 - 07:31 AM

It is definitely a good idea to use seperate cooking utensils when you live in a house that has some celiacs and some non celiacs. Especially for your kids' sakes it is better to make sure that you are taking every precaution to keep them from having problems with their health by cross contamination.
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#26 Guest_gfinnebraska_*

 
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Posted 13 September 2004 - 12:21 PM

I am learning more and more to be careful. A tiny crumb sends me into a full blown reaction. I didn't think about wearing gloves when touching bread, etc. That is a good idea. What kind do you wear? I make cookies, etc. for my family and worry about the airborne flour. Any thoughts on that??? I have purchased a toaster, utensils, pans, cutting board, etc. seperate for me. Pays to be cautious!!! Thanks for all the great advice!!! :D
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#27 Guest_NitaB_*

 
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Posted 27 September 2004 - 09:57 PM

I was much more careful at first, other than accidental mistakes. Now that I've been at this for nearly 4 months, I think I've gotten a bit lax. I ate something questionable a few days ago, had a bit of stomach pain, but not bad. Had a bit of bloating and gas, and now I'm fatigued again! Sigh! I just couldn't figure out why I seemed so listless and unenergetic.

I decided to read my celiac disease literature again, and come back here for a refresher! I can see where my mistaakes have only caused subtle problems, but it's the feeling of general malaise that has gotten to me. I see where I need to be more observant of cross-contamination, too.

My older brother died at age 63 of colon cancer, and one DR. agreed it may be entirely possible he was asymptomatic celiac. I have very few symptoms with just cross-contamination, nothing you'd think anything of, if you didn't know. So, I know I need to be more careful, with the colon cancer in my family.

Thanks everyone for the good advice, and moral support here! :)
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#28 CoolCat1

 
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Posted 28 September 2004 - 07:22 PM

Well I don't any reaction from drinking Amstel and I know a few other Celiacs that do it too w/o a reaction. To each his own I guess. I believe the company and I believe my body.
I watch what I eat and I pick my own battles. For the most part, since I stopped being so extremely careful . . . I've felt 90% better than before the diet and even after I started the diet and was watching every single morsel area I put my food.

To Pturse: There are some beers being brewed that are malt free. I heard there is one in Montreal Canada. I am sure there are more. I am not a beer drinker so I haven't investigated this further but why not take some time..use the internet or switch to liquor. I always wondered years ago before I was diagnosed for celiac disease why beer made me feel so bloated and awful. I don't think you should risk it.
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