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Weight Training Problems Since Celiac...
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7 posts in this topic

Hey there guys

im a year 19 old male from syd , australia..

I was diagnosed roughly 6/7 months ago, however in the years leading upto being diagnosed i was a football player with a great build and weighed around 77 kilos (170 LBS)

and of course going through the horrible diagnoses and diet change, i dropped a lot of weight and gt down to 140 lbs only a few months back, which was quite a hard hit on me physically and emotionally.

But since i have resumed building back up ,lifting weights and using my body, after workouts in the following days my muscles typically in my back / shoulders / neck - Knot up like crazy and get extremely stiff and i end up iwth terrible migraines becuase of lack of blood flow and have to pay $$ for massage/manipulations.. I ccant understand it, thinking about the hectick workouts i used to do even when i was becoming sick which were 3 or 4 times as gruelling as my workout now which only includes, light boxing , pushups and some chinups thats it .. Its really stressing me out i just want to know how to avoid these headaches and muscle knotting but maintain my training..

can anyone suggest anything at all please guys!!!!

any assistance much appreciated

cheers crew

dan

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The diagnosis provided you with a course of treatment, but it's not like you were "cured". You have years of malnutrition to overcome in order to restore your health. Take it easy, take your time. You may get that back, or you may not. Good luck.

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Are you keeping hydrated? I find it makes a huge difference in my recovery from exercise. Often if you cut starches out of the diet, you tend to lose a lot of water, & that can lead to cramping. Also, sodium/potassium balance could be an issue.

Leah

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I weight train and had to ease back into it. I still bruise easily, so it was the light boxing that stood out in my mind as being possibly the problem. Could you be getting injured from the boxing? -- I know before you wouldn't have been and it would be considered "light," but maybe now it's injuring you.

I always lifted to failure even when I was easing back into it, but I was being sure that I was getting up to at least 8 reps in my third set. Maybe it would be better for you for a time to lift weights like this to build the muscle back up instead of the boxing so that you are not putting so much stress on the muscles to build them. I would think the constant impact of the hit could be causing some injuries.

Also, be sure you're hydrated, and STRETCH (guys typically skip that part!!).

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Hey there guys

im a year 19 old male from syd , australia..

I was diagnosed roughly 6/7 months ago, however in the years leading upto being diagnosed i was a football player with a great build and weighed around 77 kilos (170 LBS)

and of course going through the horrible diagnoses and diet change, i dropped a lot of weight and gt down to 140 lbs only a few months back, which was quite a hard hit on me physically and emotionally.

But since i have resumed building back up ,lifting weights and using my body, after workouts in the following days my muscles typically in my back / shoulders / neck - Knot up like crazy and get extremely stiff and i end up iwth terrible migraines becuase of lack of blood flow and have to pay $$ for massage/manipulations.. I ccant understand it, thinking about the hectick workouts i used to do even when i was becoming sick which were 3 or 4 times as gruelling as my workout now which only includes, light boxing , pushups and some chinups thats it .. Its really stressing me out i just want to know how to avoid these headaches and muscle knotting but maintain my training..

can anyone suggest anything at all please guys!!!!

any assistance much appreciated

cheers crew

dan

slowly slwoly thats what ide recemend. you need to work yourself in to it.

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I had similar experience except that, after heavy weight training, I would litterally be down for the count a few hours later. It was like I was out of fuel (even though I was eating well). My muscles would take a long time to recover and I would be in a mental fog too.

I didn't know at the time that gluten intolerance was the problem. I thought it might have been reactive hypoglycemia. So I changed my diet to whole wheat pastas and grains (but of course that made things worse). I would get killer headaches about 4 hours after eating. Sort of like I was out of fuel.

Now I just started this Gluten-Free diet (4 weeks). I need time to heal up. I assume that it will take more time to refill the fuel tank, so to speak. I have to cut back on the number of workouts. Even though I feel I can work out more, I can't recover as fast because I can't get the nutrients back into the system.

From what you described, I feel you should take a similar approach. Remember that it's not the workout, it's the recovery from the workout that we have a hard time with.

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I had similar experience except that, after heavy weight training, I would litterally be down for the count a few hours later. It was like I was out of fuel (even though I was eating well). My muscles would take a long time to recover and I would be in a mental fog too.

I didn't know at the time that gluten intolerance was the problem. I thought it might have been reactive hypoglycemia. So I changed my diet to whole wheat pastas and grains (but of course that made things worse). I would get killer headaches about 4 hours after eating. Sort of like I was out of fuel.

Now I just started this Gluten-Free diet (4 weeks). I need time to heal up. I assume that it will take more time to refill the fuel tank, so to speak. I have to cut back on the number of workouts. Even though I feel I can work out more, I can't recover as fast because I can't get the nutrients back into the system.

From what you described, I feel you should take a similar approach. Remember that it's not the workout, it's the recovery from the workout that we have a hard time with.

This is good. I work out each body part only once per week, i.e. tomorrow will be chest/triceps, Tues. will be core, etc. When I was sicker, I really lowered the weight. Now I still do the split routine and give each part a week to recover. Lower the weight, increase the reps, then give yourself enough time to recover. This means, no showing off in the gym ;) Of course, I'm a girl, so no one is ever impressed with the weight I lift :lol: (Actually, guys usually find it funny that a skinny celiac girl can bench press 65 pounds and they come over to spot for me!)

I never thought of it the way you mention ... I take forever for these bruises I get so easily to go away, this makes so much sense! Don't stop working out, just adjust it. Even my husband says it was my working out that got me through this.

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