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Trace Amounts Of Gluten Acceptable


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#16 kvogt

 
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Posted 05 August 2004 - 01:47 PM

They said several interesting things in the report: that contamination in gluten-free products cannot be totally avoided; 13 of the 59 naturally gluten-free products tested contained gluten, that's 22%; 11 of the 24 Codex products contained gluten, that's 46%; people consuming 100 parts per million per day were found to have no damage; 100 ppm can be achieved by the food industry.

I think this is a blessing. They have determined a level of daily, incidental consumption that is both non-damaging to celiacs and practical to achieve by the food industry. From their test results, they show that gluten-free is not entirely possible, anyway when 22% of inheirently gluten-free products contain gluten. They mentioned "flours" so that tells me that there is some degree of risk in any baked good product that uses alternative flours. Given this information, I can't see where there will ever be any 100% certainty that a given baked good product is actually 100% gluten-free.
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#17 XoHeatherxO

 
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Posted 05 August 2004 - 04:30 PM

I think it is actually scientifically impossible to remove all gluten....It is similar to diet or fat free foods, there is a certain amount and if a food contains less then that it is able to be labeled diet or fat free....I suppose the same would have to be true with the future gluten free labeling....I'm just happy with the passing of the bill little steps!!
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[SIZE=7]Heather Ann
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#18 travelthomas

 
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Posted 06 August 2004 - 09:57 AM

Hi Heather Ann,

I disagree with you 100%. It is just a case of creating the proper environment to create 0ppm food. As long as people believe that a little poison is alright, we will still be poisoned.

I agree with you that some of us create our lives. Most people seem to be happy to let others create their lives for them.
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#19 kvogt

 
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Posted 08 August 2004 - 11:09 PM

travelthomas,

To suggest that 0ppm is practical by "just creating the proper environment", to paraphrase, is unsupportable. Generally, quantums in purity are achived by quantums in additional cost. I doubt anyone will be able to afford a $40 or $400 bag of 0 parts per million gluten-free grain flour.
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#20 rattaway

 
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Posted 09 August 2004 - 05:49 AM

Hey fellow celiacs. Just remember, a little bit goes a long way when it comes to accepting even the tiniest amounts of gluten. Secondly, do we have to change our names to "somewhat celiac" if they are still allowing gluten? If you give them an inch, the product companies may take a yard!
Rian
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#21 lovegrov

 
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Posted 09 August 2004 - 07:01 AM

The sad fact is that 20 percent of processed foods that are not supposed to have gluten do actually have measurable gluten because of contamination somewhere in the process.

richard
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#22 kvogt

 
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Posted 10 August 2004 - 11:23 AM

I'm not saying that anyone should be happy about getting any amount of gluten in a "gluten-free" product. I'm just saying that it will be impossible to achieve - all the time - and still be affordable.

If anyone wants to ensure they are 0ppm gluten-free, all the time, they should stop eating any gluten-free grain products. No breads, cakes, cookies, pizzas, etc.
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#23 travelthomas

 
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Posted 29 October 2004 - 11:23 AM

Tinkyada rice pasta is produced in a dedicated factory, and I bought it at Albertsons here in College Station, Texas.
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#24 plantime

 
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Posted 29 October 2004 - 01:40 PM

And avoiding all grain products is a problem because??? I am allergic to most grains, and have no problems with meat and veggies for meals. 0ppm is a goal worth achieving.
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Dessa

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#25 celiac3270

 
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Posted 29 October 2004 - 02:36 PM

I think it is actually scientifically impossible to remove all gluten....It is similar to diet or fat free foods, there is a certain amount and if a food contains less then that it is able to be labeled diet or fat free....I suppose the same would have to be true with the future gluten free labeling....I'm just happy with the passing of the bill little steps!!

Though it is debatable as to whether or not 0 ppm is practical, I don't think anyone can argue that it is "scientifically impossible to remove all the gluten." That would be saying, for example, that if I eat a banana, I am guaranteed to ingest gluten.

Additionally, whether it is practical to make a 100% gluten-free food or not, it is practical for companies to warn consumers that their so-called "gluten-free" products are made in a factory that makes gluten products. Companies such as FritoLays warn their consumers, so there's no reason why the makers of special gluten-free foods should be contaminating celiacs without even warning against contamination....i'm starting to ramble......:)
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#26 Lorifran57

 
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Posted 31 October 2004 - 12:10 AM

it sounds to me like nothing has changed in the companies and the laws. This is the same for other disclaimers on foods.

if a food ingredient is a 'trade secret' they do not have to list it either I beleive unless that too has changed.

i am not surprised by write up.

truth is when i eat something that says gluten free i look at the labeling anyways.

but yeah...I'm not surprised that this is being studied and applied in this way for business reasons in companies. it also helps them that are too lazy to do the extra work of actually trying to make things allergen free for concumers.

Lori
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#27 debmidge

 
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Posted 01 November 2004 - 03:26 AM

Dear Board Members:
I will start this with a disclaimer: My opinion and comments in the forthcoming message are in no way to be construed as anti-Semitic. Rather it's a criticism of the US, state & local government and how they use their "food inspection offices." So please do not try to pick it apart and look for an offending "hidden meaning." I don't want this thing to get kooky like the Catholic host subject.

Many years ago observant Jewish people had a hard time with merchants who claimed to be selling them Kosher food. For religious, not health reasons, that's the only kind of food which they are allowed to eat. At some point, the government stepped in and made it against the law for food manufacturers to declare anything Kosher when it's not.

My point is: I think celiacs are due the same governmental consideration. Even more so because it's a health issue. It's an issue of life or death, not a personal preference. Perhaps we should demand that the govt. keep gluten-free food labeling on the forefront always. Never let the govt lose sight of it.
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Husband has Celiac Disease and
Husband misdiagnosed for 27 yrs -
The misdiagnosis was: IBS or colitis
Mis-diagnosed from 1977 to 2003 by various gastros including one of the largest,
most prestigious medical groups in northern NJ which constantly advertises themselves as
being the "best." This GI told him it was "all in his head."
Serious Depressive state ensued
Finally Diagnosed with celiac disease in 2003
Other food sensitivities: almost all fruits, vegetables, spices, eggs, nuts, yeast, fried foods, roughage, soy.
Needs to gain back at least 25 lbs. of the 40 lbs pounds he lost - lost a great amout of body fat and muscle
Developed neuropathy in 2005
Now has lymphadema 2006
It is my opinion that his subsequent disorders could have been avoided had he been diagnosed sooner by any of the dozen or so doctors he saw between 1977 to 2003




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