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Cardio - How To Get Started ?
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Okay so like its realy summer now, and my 90 min walks with my wife in the "cool" even hours are over. I cant take 85 degrees, never mind the 100+ we have been seeing. SO I pulled out my treadmill (and my trusty soddering iron to repair it...) and plan to jog on that for now.

This is where I should note I have a heart conditoin.... :D

But this hypoglycmia diet stuff is killing me wieght wise, up about 10 pounds since starting it. Today I ran for about 30 mins, and got about 2.2 miles in... horrid compared to what I did in HS, but time at a desk will do that do you! Thinkink I could try to do that every day for a while and see how it goes. That was about 4.5mph, but it was realy pushing it. In fact fell off once! :) Then did about 2 mins of cool down walking.

The odd thing that I cant figure out is my feet after a whiel get that pins and needles feeling like they are falling asleep.

So umm, what was I gonna ask again... OH YEA! Whats a good starting plan for this? My main goal realy is to exercise my heart, see if I cant get my ejection faction up before the next heart scan so I dont have to go on all kinds of wierdo meds!

Thanks!

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There is a formula for the appropriate heart rate that uses your age. I'll look and see if I can find it on the net ...

You should keep your heart rate at the level for cardiovascular fitness for at least 20 minutes per session. With your heart condition, I would recommend running it by your doctor as he may suggest starting out at a lower heart rate. Don't worry about number of miles, to work out your heart, it's time and heart rate that are important.

Here's a heart rate calculator I found: http://exercise.about.com/cs/fitnesstools/l/bl_THR.htm

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How the heck do you check that while your running? I kept trying but just did not work out. AFTER my cool down I timed about 120 bpm though.

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The odd thing that I cant figure out is my feet after a whiel get that pins and needles feeling like they are falling asleep.

Thanks!

I had this problem. I do the elliptical machine, so I don't have to worry so much about support in my shoes since it's no impact. I wear my shoes loose and don't have that problem anymore. Be sure you have good support though for running.

How the heck do you check that while your running? I kept trying but just did not work out. AFTER my cool down I timed about 120 bpm though.

Ha, the machines in the gym do it for me. You can get a heart rate monitor, or slow down to a walk and take it while walking. Take it on your neck rather than your wrist, it's easier. Obviously, you need a clock. If you take it for 6 seconds, just multiply by 10.

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Well I need buy some running shoes thats for sure, the hiking boots that I normaly wear prbly not the best choice I guess....

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Well I need buy some running shoes thats for sure, the hiking boots that I normaly wear prbly not the best choice I guess....

:lol::lol::lol: Running shoes would be a great start! Hiking boots on a treadmill :o

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:lol::lol::lol: Running shoes would be a great start! Hiking boots on a treadmill :o

Yea i could not hear the TV over the THUD THUD THUD :lol:

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4.5mph is faster that I can run for half an hour! :-) If you're truely working on just cardio, and having a heart condition, you want to go for duration, not speed.

Given how hard you were working, I would suggest the following:

1. Don't run every day. Especially if, until now, you had been primarily walking. No more than five days a week - your rest days non-consecutive - for the first four weeks.

2. Slow down first. Falling off is not a good sigh, you silly over-achieving man. :P Just like my husband when we went trail running... He went faster than me the first mile, then I kicked his ass the next mile and a half.

3. Try to work towards 45 minute, sustained intensity jogs. Nothing high intensity.

4. Get some running shoes (appropriate for your feet)!

5. While you're a man and can train faster than a woman (darn all that testosterone you have), you're not an 18-year old man. Overtraining is easy to do at first.

A possibly training schedule would be:

1. This week: 30 min @ 4mph x 2 / 35 min @ 4mph x 2

2. Next week: 40 min @ 4mph x 2 / 40 min @ 4.2mph x 2

3. Third week: 40 min @ 4.5mph x 2 / 40 min @ 5mph x 2

4. Fourth week: 45 minutes at 5mph

5. Fifth week - play around with it, but don't worry about increasing in speed so much as increasing in duration

(If you choose to do 5 days a week, consider making the fifth day just an inclined walk - set the incline for something steep (mine goes up to 10%), and see if you can do 3mph or even just 2.5mph. It's another interesting challenge. If you can't stand sitting still on your days of rest, don't do more than long walks - your muscles need time to recoup from the running, and days of rest are important for preventing injury. Something my husband has to remind me of often.)

BTW, if you're treadmill isn't in line of sight to a TV or game console, I highly encourage mounting a cheap 17" LCD monitor to the wall, getting an adapter so you can hook up a playstation to it, getting a wireless playstation controller, and then being able to play games while running (or watch DVD's...). :D

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Well I need buy some running shoes thats for sure, the hiking boots that I normaly wear prbly not the best choice I guess....

ROFL I can totally picture this!! Yea, get the right shoes, the feet will feel better. Of course, the shoes won't be so heavy, so you'll have to run faster to get your heart rate up!

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2. Slow down first. Falling off is not a good sigh, you silly over-achieving man. tongue.gif Just like my husband when we went trail running... He went faster than me the first mile, then I kicked his ass the next mile and a half.

LOL well I fell off cause I lost focus for a bit :D I used to run Winter Track, Spring Track, and Cross Country in HS, I was never a super star, but I used to manage a 5 min mile :( and ran the 5k in like 20 mins. LIke I said, not a superstar! :D Infact was one of the slowest on my team... but was good exercise!

Running out the door will read and consider the rest of your post when I get back, thanks!!!!

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LOL well I fell off cause I lost focus for a bit :D I used to run Winter Track, Spring Track, and Cross Country in HS, I was never a super star, but I used to manage a 5 min mile :( and ran the 5k in like 20 mins. LIke I said, not a superstar! :D Infact was one of the slowest on my team... but was good exercise!

Running out the door will read and consider the rest of your post when I get back, thanks!!!!

Oh, excellent! You know what you're getting into!

My husband ran track through HS as well. He's the one who trained me. :-) I envy the fact that you guys can train so quickly. :-P He's only been out of high school for 10 years, but he's noticed that he can't train nearly as quickly these days, and that his body just can't take the same abuse it used to be able to.

Since you know what you're getting into, I suggest ditching my suggestions, and googling online for training suggestions, but toning them down a little bit. It's still length over speed (I know, I know, you'll miss the glory days, but until your aerobic capacity lets you run 6 minute miles with a moderate heart rate, it's not going to do you a lot of good), of course, but you've got a good back ground for training!

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Wait a second! You ran a 5 minute mile? And you were one of the slowest in HS? Did you go to HS in Kenya?

Why the heck are you asking us again? The fastest I ever ran a mile was in six minutes. LOL!

OK here are the basics of what you need to do.

1. Shoes!!! Get a good pair of shoes!!

2. Don't do too much too soon (shin splints).

3. Realize you can't stare at the stars and run at the same time.

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Vladimir, is that you in your avatar???? How the heck did you get in that position?????

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Nah! That's not me. If only I could get a tan. But my red hair and Irish heritage prevents that.

I've done that before but I've never had a person around that could take the picture correctly. It's all about the shutter speed. You are actually only in that position for a half second.

I stumbled across the picture when I was visiting kayak sites. I love to kayak.

BTW. Nice picture (you two look happy).

VG

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Nah! That's not me. If only I could get a tan. But my red hair and Irish heritage prevents that.

I've done that before but I've never had a person around that could take the picture correctly. It's all about the shutter speed. You are actually only in that position for a half second.

I stumbled across the picture when I was visiting kayak sites. I love to kayak.

BTW. Nice picture (you two look happy).

VG

Thank you. Twenty one years of marriage and still best friends.

I've never been kayaking. Sounds fun.

Irish heritage, gluten problem, what a surprise! I have English heritage and am pale, but tan easily. Strange, my grandfather who passed on his English heritage (and gluten intolerance, but never diagnosed, always had stomach and joint problems though), also was fair and blue eyed, but tanned easily.

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Thank you. Twenty one years of marriage and still best friends.

I've never been kayaking. Sounds fun.

Irish heritage, gluten problem, what a surprise! I have English heritage and am pale, but tan easily. Strange, my grandfather who passed on his English heritage (and gluten intolerance, but never diagnosed, always had stomach and joint problems though), also was fair and blue eyed, but tanned easily.

Kayaking is great! You should definitely give it a try! (Get a kayak with a rudder, for your first time. It will make the learning experience more enjoyable. :-) ) And given all that paleness, plenty of sunblock! :-)

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Kayaking is great! You should definitely give it a try! (Get a kayak with a rudder, for your first time. It will make the learning experience more enjoyable. :-) ) And given all that paleness, plenty of sunblock! :-)

Thanks for the advice! That pic was taken back in May, I've got a good tan going now! :D I wonder where I could kayak around here ... hmmm, have to look into it!

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My experience is that guys with backgrounds in sports like track have an impossible time finding a reasonable pace on the treadmill. They always start way too fast for their present condition.

I recommend you start with a 15 minute mile, and check your pulse every 15 minutes. This will feel really slow, but it is important not to overdo it, as overdoing it will not get you in shape more quickly. Your target heartrate should be about 120-140. If you have a workout where you don't reach that, turn the treadmill up one-tenth of a mile per hour for the next workout. This will take a lot longer than when you were young and capable of quick recovery after really hard workouts. You're in it for the long haul, so hang in there.

You might want to invest in a heart monitor.

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Hi! Like everyone said you need to get running shoes, and also make sure they are roomy because your feet increase in size while you are running. Our running store suggests a whole size bigger than you normally wear.

And I second getting a heart rate monitor if you can afford it. I don't have one right now, but I had one on long-term loan for awhile and that was cool. I also have one built into my stationary bike. It's very instructive to see what your heart rate is. After a while, though, you will be able to listen to your body better.

http://www.trifuel.com/triathlon/triathlon...ster-001091.php

Here's an article about improving your aerobic base. It explains to spend several weeks in 60-80% of your MHR so that you can improve your aerobic capacity. It's good stuff if you get a heart rate monitor.

Good luck!

Catherine

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Wait a second! You ran a 5 minute mile? And you were one of the slowest in HS? Did you go to HS in Kenya?

I happened to be running on the state championship team at the time LOL They were hitting close 4 min miles, I was also running over 120 miles a week at the time, AND riding my bike to and from pratice. I was a freaking nutcase :D . But since you asked, Toms River HS North, NJ.

Work outs for that was nuts though! Dont think I could handle the 1/4mile full out sprint foolowed by 1/4mil jog (repeat 10 times, no breaks) any more! Gosh those sucked big time!

3. Try to work towards 45 minute, sustained intensity jogs. Nothing high intensity.

So does that include cooldown/warm up? I was thinking 5 mins fast walk warm up, and decreasing speed 5 min cool down, with 30 mins at what ever speed I could manage.

BTW, if you're treadmill isn't in line of sight to a TV or game console, I highly encourage mounting a cheap 17" LCD monitor to the wall, getting an adapter so you can hook up a playstation to it, getting a wireless playstation controller, and then being able to play games while running (or watch DVD's...).

I use my laptop for TV while I run currently I plan to get some educational type DVD's in time to help use the time more effectively. :D

4.5mph is faster that I can run for half an hour! :-) If you're truely working on just cardio, and having a heart condition, you want to go for duration, not speed.

Well I hope to drop about 7-10 pounds that I picked up on the hyposugarstuff diet, but basicly my main concern is my underperforming heart. I guess I should check with the cardiodude to make sure this is safe, huh? :rolleyes:

My experience is that guys with backgrounds in sports like track have an impossible time finding a reasonable pace on the treadmill. They always start way too fast for their present condition.

Thats couse its so depressing. Thankfully my coach is several states away!

You might want to invest in a heart monitor.

How much do they run?

(If you choose to do 5 days a week, consider making the fifth day just an inclined walk - set the incline for something steep (mine goes up to 10%), and see if you can do 3mph or even just 2.5mph. It's another interesting challenge. If you can't stand sitting still on your days of rest, don't do more than long walks - your muscles need time to recoup from the running, and days of rest are important for preventing injury. Something my husband has to remind me of often.)

Umm so that walk I just took with my wife around a garden conservaotry (indoors) was a bad plan ? :D

1. Don't run every day. Especially if, until now, you had been primarily walking. No more than five days a week - your rest days non-consecutive - for the first four weeks.

So every other day basicly?

Oh, excellent! You know what you're getting into!

Not realy, not as far as planning/etc goes, I just did what ever the coach said and did not think much aobut it. I was there for the exercise, not the sport realy. Adrenaline is a natural treatment for many mental disorders, so it was more of therapy then anything. :)

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So does that include cooldown/warm up? I was thinking 5 mins fast walk warm up, and decreasing speed 5 min cool down, with 30 mins at what ever speed I could manage.

you look like you're looking for a challenge, so I wouldn't include the warm up, but you could if you wanted to.

Well I hope to drop about 7-10 pounds that I picked up on the hyposugarstuff diet, but basicly my main concern is my underperforming heart. I guess I should check with the cardiodude to make sure this is safe, huh? :rolleyes:

*shakes finger* yes, you should be checking with your cardio-dude. (and make sure to call him that too! :P ) but see, here is where your testosterone-laden system will get you into trouble. you are no longer going for the adrenaline rush of "whatever speed you can manage". you are going for a specific effect, and that's one that will be obtained at a slower speed than your top speed. better get some more interesting DVD's? ;-) the conditioning you're looking for is one that comes from endurance, not speed. if you ran track, maybe you had to run a 10k? and you remember that you ran that a lot slower than running a mile. you're aiming to run 10k's here, not miles. and you're not doing time trials. in fact, if you can't keep a conversation going while you're running, it's a really quick sign that you're working too hard. *that* is not something you want to do with a heart condition. start slow slow slow, ESPECIALLY with an underperforming heart.

Umm so that walk I just took with my wife around a garden conservaotry (indoors) was a bad plan ? :D So every other day basicly?

No! I didn't mean to say that, exactly. I just mean that you don't want to run every day. You need days of rest. Walking is fabulous. If you're willing to not run every day (which would be better, but it seemed like you wanted to), alternating running with walking would be great! I wanted to suggest three days of running a week, but got the impression you'd disregard that as "too wimpy". :P Besides, how can a walk through a garden with the wife be a bad thing? :-) That leads to bonus excersize. :ph34r:

eKatherine is right - it's very easy to start too fast (on or off a treadmill). pacing yourself is *hard*. but besides getting a heart monitor (probably a very wise choice, and worth a trip to the sporting goods store after talking to your cardio, eh?), use that conversation test. make sure you can talk reasonably comfortably *while* running. you shouldn't be out of breath. if you are, you're working too hard.

btw, rei seems to have heart rate monitors (the variety with the chest strap) for as low as $50. I would imagine a sporting goods store may have them a bit cheaper.

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No! I didn't mean to say that, exactly. I just mean that you don't want to run every day. You need days of rest. Walking is fabulous. If you're willing to not run every day (which would be better, but it seemed like you wanted to), alternating running with walking would be great! I wanted to suggest three days of running a week, but got the impression you'd disregard that as "too wimpy". tongue.gif Besides, how can a walk through a garden with the wife be a bad thing? :-) That leads to bonus excersize.

No, dont assume stuff like that. :D Remeber I am the numbers geek? I am far more intrested in the "best" plan, then the macho one. :P So say I run Mon/Wens/Fri, 30 mins @ 4 mph, plus 5warm/cool? Walking is almost not an option, since its to WAY hot out side and its not often we have a sitter so that we can walk in the garden conservatory. I could walk on the treadmill I guess.... why would walking be a good plan? Do you mean do it on the rest days (say tues/thurs) or instead of a run day?

Hopfully I will think to call the cardiodude tommorow...

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No, dont assume stuff like that. :D Remeber I am the numbers geek? I am far more intrested in the "best" plan, then the macho one. :P So say I run Mon/Wens/Fri, 30 mins @ 4 mph, plus 5warm/cool? Walking is almost not an option, since its to WAY hot out side and its not often we have a sitter so that we can walk in the garden conservatory. I could walk on the treadmill I guess.... why would walking be a good plan? Do you mean do it on the rest days (say tues/thurs) or instead of a run day?

Hopfully I will think to call the cardiodude tommorow...

Yep, I meant walking would be great for the days you're not running. My FIL had a heart attack a few years ago and regularly goes on 1-2 hour walks (~18-20 minute miles, I think), nearly every day - but he has no interest in running, and does west coast swing two or three times a week. It's good because your body needs a rest from the impact of running, but it'll still give you an increased aerobic demand. Think of it as a minimal break. :)

Say, can you go for walks, in the evening, with your son? I know my in-laws used to do that with their kids, and they always would have talks about how things worked, or make up stories, or map out the area they were walking through. Eh... It sounds nice hearing about it. I don't know if it cools down quickly enough where you are, though.

Running M/W/F @ 4mph for 30min, plus 5min warmup and cooldown is probably good. But if you can't carry off a conversation at that speed, slow it down (a lot) and work your way up, 0.2mph at a time. (I'm impatient too. :-) ) While your cardio may say that 30 minutes of exercise a day is fine, remember that he may give you minimum numbers, designed to get lazy Americans, who would rather pay someone to exercise so they can sit in front of the TV, to do the minimum. Aim for - eventually - running longer than that (up to an hour if you've got it, and you're joints are in good shape - and you've ditched those hiking shoes, heck, running barefoot might be better than hiking shoes!). Don't increase too quickly (I wouldn't increase time by more than 5 minutes per week). You're heart is a muscle - and it sounds like it may be a weak one - and it needs time to grow into the demands you're going to place on it. (This is almost making me feel *lucky* to have asthma - my lungs are the limiting factor on my running at this point.)

The thing is, like the hypoglycemic stuff, it's hard to say what the "best" plan is. BUT! There's good news! It's *much* easier to figure it out than the hypoglycemic stuff! :-) The 4mph for 30 minute thing feel just a little challenging? Keep with it for the week, then bump it up. Were you huffin' and puffin' and couldn't carry a conversation? Slow down your speed (0.2 increments) until you can carry a conversation, and keep at it for a week, then bump it up. Was it easy-peasy, and you got off there ready to run another two miles? Keep going for another 5 minutes. Still too easy? Next run day, bump up the speed - a little (0.2) - and see how it goes. As you continue, your body will tell you what to do next.

Basic rules of thumb to always remember:

1. Always be able to carry on a conversation. :-) (I'm nothing if not repetitious)

2. Increase distance or speed - not both at the same time.

3. Get good shoes for your feet.

Definitely ask your cardio if he/she has any training advice, however, or who might be able to help with that. My understanding is that speed increases are times you need to be careful with weak heart muscles, but I don't know a lot about the heart.

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Say, can you go for walks, in the evening, with your son? I know my in-laws used to do that with their kids, and they always would have talks about how things worked, or make up stories, or map out the area they were walking through. Eh... It sounds nice hearing about it. I don't know if it cools down quickly enough where you are, though.

Last night, we got home at nearly 8pm and the thermometer was reading 99. Thas about 19 degrees over my outdoors cut off! Kristi and I took our son for a walk when it was in the 70's for a while. Walked about 5 miles daily. Was nice while it lasted... :(

Running M/W/F @ 4mph for 30min, plus 5min warmup and cooldown is probably good. But if you can't carry off a conversation at that speed, slow it down (a lot) and work your way up, 0.2mph at a time. (I'm impatient too. :-) ) While your cardio may say that 30 minutes of exercise a day is fine, remember that he may give you minimum numbers, designed to get lazy Americans, who would rather pay someone to exercise so they can sit in front of the TV, to do the minimum. Aim for - eventually - running longer than that (up to an hour if you've got it, and you're joints are in good shape - and you've ditched those hiking shoes, heck, running barefoot might be better than hiking shoes!). Don't increase too quickly (I wouldn't increase time by more than 5 minutes per week). You're heart is a muscle - and it sounds like it may be a weak one - and it needs time to grow into the demands you're going to place on it. (This is almost making me feel *lucky* to have asthma - my lungs are the limiting factor on my running at this point.)

Okay thats what I'll do. I am a bit stiff/sore today heh. I dunno about walking on my off days though, I guess I could do it on the tread mill. But prehaps I best just start with M/W/F @ 30 mins and see if I can force myself to think this is a good plan. :huh:

Today though I think I will head to a store for shoes, I HATE shoe shopping though, I wear a tripple or quadruple E (pending brand) and its VERY hard to find anything decent, esply if you dont want to take a a 3rd mortage to buy a pair....

Oh yea, I might call the cardiodude :P too.

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Call the dude today! We don't want anything to happen to you :D

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