Get email alerts Get E-mail Alerts Sponsor: Sponsor:

Ads by Google:

   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE email alerts

Neutrogena Products

3 posts in this topic

I have many Neutrogena products (shampoos, facial soaps and makeups, etc.) in my CSA product lising. I bought several when I started the diet.

Since I've been on the diet, the shampoo had caused me a lot of itchiness and dandruff, and the facial soap has caused me those aweful blisters all over my face. At first I thought it was just acne. I also noticed that my complexion had an over-all bumpiness to it which I just attributed to 'getting older'.

But as soon as I stopped using the shampoo and used Pantene, my scalp cleared up the first day.

I don't know of any common facial-soaps that are gluten-free, so I ordered one from the company I work for (a bit pricey though - at least for me;)), but I didn't want to have to wait for it to come and keep causing blisters on my face.

So I started using my kids' 'Toms of Maine' baby soap on my face (since I know it's gluten-free) and after just 1 day, all of the bumpiness went completely away, and the blisters are clearing up (today is day 3).

I never had dh before, but now that I've become more sensative to the gluten in these products, I know I have to pay close attention to what I'm using.

Has anyone else ever had problems with Neutrogena? They do state in the listing that their products may contain trace amounts of gluten and to use with caution.

Well, I'm certain that they do INDEED contain gluten, and I'm a firm believer that NO ONE who is Celiac should ever use products with any gluten if they can help it - even if they don't see any symptoms (of course, that is just my opinion).



Share this post

Link to post
Share on other sites

Ads by Google:

Donna, Thank you for your post. I am doing research for my daughter. Do know of any other products that she should stay away from or a site that lists products that are gluten free?


Share this post

Link to post
Share on other sites


Yes, you can get a product listing guide from the Celiac Sprue Association. It's about $20 and lists everything you can think of in it. You can get one here:

just scroll down to the phone # and you can order that way too.

The only drawback to it is that there really are a lot more gluten-free products out there that AREn't listed in the book. That is where I have found this site so helpful. sometimes I do a search on here for an item. Yesterday I looked up french fries and found a post that said Ore Ida is gluten-free. I always check the date of the post though, b/c ingredients change from time to time and what may have been gluten-free last year may not be this year. I think Hershey's is guilty of this. The Celiac Sprue Association told me that Reeses pb cups are NOT gluten-free any more, nor are Snickers and a few others. I think Hershey's kisses are the only ones that are definately gluten-free.

I've also seen posts that many Lay's snacks are gluten-free, but Lays admits that there may be some cross-contamination. Some people are more sensitive than others, and other people have no obvious symptoms at all, so companies like Lays and Neutrogena that say some products are gluten-free, you should be weary of for cross-contamintation (if you are being extra-vigilant).

I'm sure there are others, but if you want specifics, try an online search or a search on here. But I highly-recommend the CSA's product listing guide as a quick reference for many, MANY things. At least it'll give you a nice foundation to work from.

And email a company or call them if you're not sure. I emailed Cape Cod potato chips the other day and all of the unflavored chips are gluten-free. I emailed Popsicle today to see if they will give me a gluten-free product listing. Sometimes I call if I need to know in a pinch (and I take my cell and CSA listing guide to the store with me!).

Hope that helps a little. I've learned a lot these past 3 or 4 months. I did this diet a few months last year too (b4 I knew for sure) so I'm getting better at this. This site ( also gives a safe/unsafe ingredient list, but looking up every ingredient is exhausting and companies don't even have to list every single ingredient if it doesn't comprise a certain percentage of the overall ingredients (pathetic!)

Good luck! Hope your daughter is well now!



Share this post

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
    • Total Posts
  • Topics

  • Posts

    • Yes, there are other grains that have gluten but they don't have the TYPE of gluten that affects celiacs. Celaics can not have the gluten in wheat, barley, & rye. Corn has gluten but it is not the kind of gluten we react to. I actually use corn gluten in my garden as it prevents weed seeds from sprouting. LOL! Hey, it works great! Read these: Gluten is the name for the protein in grains. All grains contain protein that is theoretically gluten but people with celiac disease and most other gluten allergies only react to the form of gluten found in wheat (including spelt, kamut, triticale and all varieties of wheat), barley, and rye. From:   I've run across another gluten urban legend that needs to be dispelled: the idea that people with celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity actually react to gluten in all grains, not just wheat, barley, rye and sometimes oats. This just isn't true, despite what you might have heard or read. People who react to the gluten protein found in wheat, barley and rye don't automatically need to avoid rice, corn, millet, sorghum and other grains. From:   There are some unsavory sites out there in internet land that will tell you celiacs cross react to all grains. They generally have something to sell, a book, a video, some vitamins or other things. They use scare tactics to sell what they are selling. These claims simply are not true. If they were, then all the people on this site who have gotten well while not eating wheat, barley & rye but continuing to eat rice, quinoa, corn & so forth would not have gotten well; they would be dead by now & there would be no "old timers" on this site because they would have eventually died from eating grains other than wheat, barley & rye. Celiacs can develop sensitivities to other foods, even foods like cabbage or lettuce or potatoes or even rice or maybe only brown rice but that does not mean they are reacting b/c of gluten in those things. You may be doing great since eliminating rice from your diet and that is wonderful that you figured out that it affects you but that does not mean the rice contains the kind of protein that celiacs can not tolerate.  
    • Working a modifying a recipe to be both Vegan and Grain free. I am a bit low on funds right now and can not test it. Feed back is welcome and if you do it perhaps  get me a grams breakdown for duplication. 1 cup almond flour
      ½ cup unsweetened shredded coconut
      1 teaspoons cinnamon
      1 teaspoons apple pie spice
      1 teaspoon baking soda
      ½ teaspoon salt
      ¾ cup unsweetened applesauce
      ½ cup almond butter
      ½ cup Maple/Agave
      2 Tablespoons soft coconut oil
      2 Tablespoons Ground Flax Seed combined with 5 table spoons water whisked and set aside
      1 medium apple, diced small (about 1¼ cups)
      1 cup chopped pecans
      ¼ cup flax seeds

      Preheat oven to 350° F and grease a 9 x 13 inch baking pan.
      In a mixing bowl, whisk together the almond flour, coconut, cinnamon, baking soda, and salt.
      Add the applesauce, almond butter, honey, coconut oil, and ground flax mixture. Beat with a mixer until everything is incorporated.
      Stir in the diced apple, pecans, and flax seeds.
      Spread the batter in the prepared pan and bake for 25min
    • Sorry - didnt realize you couldnt see it. Talked about all grains having gluten.  
    • We can't see the video carle.  The site is banned from celiac com for spamming. Not having seen it, I'd guess they are selling something?
    • Sorry Doit, Ok, I think I see what you are talking about.  The serum IgA test?  The serum IgA is to verify if your body does make IgA antibodies.  Not all of us make that particular antibody type.  you do make IgA antibodies though, and your reading is fairly high.  the way I understand it, the serum IgA is not specific to celiac disease.  It does indicate a level of antibody activity though.  So perhaps you are fighting an infection or something?  Or it is celiac and for some reason your blood levels of antibodies are not high enough to detect right now. The below info on serum IgA is from Quest Labs. ******************************************************************** Test Highlight IgA, Serum    Clinical Use Diagnose IgA deficiencies Determine etiology of recurrent infections Diagnose infection Diagnose inflammation Diagnose IgA monoclonal gammopathy Clinical Background IgA is the first line of defense for the majority of infections at mucosal surfaces and consists of 2 subclasses. IgA1 is the dominant subclass, accounting for 80% to 90% of total serum IgA and greater than half of the IgA in secretions such as milk, saliva, and tears. IgA2, on the other hand, is more concentrated in secretions than in blood. IgA2 is more resistant to proteolytic cleavage and may be more functionally active than IgA1. IgA deficiency is the most prevalent isotype deficiency, occurring in 1/400 to 1/700 individuals. Many patients with IgA deficiency are asymptomatic, while others may develop allergic disease, repeated sinopulmonary or gastroenterologic infections, and/or autoimmune disease. Individuals with complete absence of IgA (<5 mg/dL) may develop autoantibodies to IgA after blood or intravenous immunoglobulin infusions and may experience anaphylaxis on repeat exposure. Elevated serum IgA levels are associated with infection, inflammation, or IgA monoclonal gammopathy. Method In this nephelometric method, anti-human IgA binds to IgA in the patient sample, forming an insoluble complex. The amount of light scattered by this insoluble complex is proportional to the concentration of IgA present in the sample.   ********************************************************************
  • Upcoming Events

  • Blog Entries

  • Recent Status Updates

  • Who's Online (See full list)

  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
    • Most Online

    Newest Member