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Low Bone Density
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Im 15 and under weight and I recently had a bone scan that showed I had low bone density. I know I have to do weight bearing exercise besides intaking calcium, but I'm not sure if what Im doing is enough (elliptical 30-40 min, 3-6xs a week and weight training with a trainer 1hr and 15 min, 2xs a week).

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1. you need to take, at a minimum, a calcium, vitamin D, and magnesium supplement. studies have shown the magnesium is as, if not more, important than calcium for celiacs for bone density. and calcium is not useful without D for bone growth.

2. make sure to stay strictly gluten free, so you get the minerals and vitamins (and nutrition) you need!

3. ellipticals don't provide much in the form of weight bearing exercise - its not much more than standing - due to the way they're designed. jogging, or even hiking or walking, would be a much better weight bearing exercise. yoga can help as well, if you get a moderate intensity class, and stick with it regularly (3x a week). the weight training is definitely good, though I'd work up to adding another day a week eventually on that.

4. getting your weight up to normal will help with the bone density! eat, eat, and eat some more. hopefully being gluten free will help your body absorb what you're eating so you can actually keep some weight on now. stick to healthy, high calorie-density foods (nuts, avocados, dried fruits) for the best effect.

good luck! :-)

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Thanks so much for teh advise!

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Do you like rollarblading, skating, biking or hiking? You may enjoy these activities more with a friend.

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I've done speedskating, and I personnally would recommend against skating for anyone with low bone density. Not only is it not a weight-bearing exercise, but you can fall and hurt yourself easily. You fall a lot as a beginner, and even if you are expert you can wipe out at any time.

If you do decide to do inline skating, make sure you wear kneepads, wristguards, elbow pads, and a helmet.

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actually, biking isn't weight bearing either. But it is fun!

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I really enjoy walking as my weight bearing exercise. Arrange a time to go walking with a friend - that can make it so much more enjoyable. Walking is low-impact and so it is less likely to damage joints.

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Lifting weights can also help. Maybe you can join a local fitness center and get a session or two with a personal trainer. He or she can show you some good exercises to do and how to do them with proper form, etc.

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Yes, I already work with a personal trainer twice a week for an hr and 15 min doing weight lifting (Im trying to build muscle before volleyball season), but is dancing or jump roping weight bearing, except, I have knee pains.

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1. you need to take, at a minimum, a calcium, vitamin D, and magnesium supplement. studies have shown the magnesium is as, if not more, important than calcium for celiacs for bone density. and calcium is not useful without D for bone growth.

2. make sure to stay strictly gluten free, so you get the minerals and vitamins (and nutrition) you need!

3. ellipticals don't provide much in the form of weight bearing exercise - its not much more than standing - due to the way they're designed. jogging, or even hiking or walking, would be a much better weight bearing exercise. yoga can help as well, if you get a moderate intensity class, and stick with it regularly (3x a week). the weight training is definitely good, though I'd work up to adding another day a week eventually on that.

4. getting your weight up to normal will help with the bone density! eat, eat, and eat some more. hopefully being gluten free will help your body absorb what you're eating so you can actually keep some weight on now. stick to healthy, high calorie-density foods (nuts, avocados, dried fruits) for the best effect.

good luck! :-)

Are you sure about ellipticals not being a good weight-bearing exercise? It's definitely low-impact (that's why I use it instead of treadmill, because my knees are a mess), but if the resistance is moderate to high it certainly feels as if my legs are exerting lots of force. Definitely much more than just standing! I'm thinking it's akin to weight-lifting in that it is a series of alternating single-leg presses, more or less.

Leah

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Are you sure about ellipticals not being a good weight-bearing exercise? It's definitely low-impact (that's why I use it instead of treadmill, because my knees are a mess), but if the resistance is moderate to high it certainly feels as if my legs are exerting lots of force. Definitely much more than just standing! I'm thinking it's akin to weight-lifting in that it is a series of alternating single-leg presses, more or less.

Leah

I've been told and read that it wasn't - and in general, low impact isn't as weight bearing - but I could well be wrong about that. It's certainly better than standing! :-) The impact itself helps stimulate bone growth, but the pressure helps as well. Interesting question... We'll have to see if we can find any more information on it! :-)

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I've been told and read that it wasn't - and in general, low impact isn't as weight bearing - but I could well be wrong about that. It's certainly better than standing! :-) The impact itself helps stimulate bone growth, but the pressure helps as well. Interesting question... We'll have to see if we can find any more information on it! :-)

I'm hoping the sources that say it isn't good are either comparing it directly to higher-impact activities like jogging-- there's no doubt that's better for bone-building, so long as your joints can take it!-- or assuming that people will take the "path of least resistance." On low resistance & low incline, the force required is much lower.

Now I am anxious to know, because unless my knees get well as my gluten issues fade, the E will be my mainstay for cardio forever. I haven't been diagnosed with osteoporosis (haven't been tested) but I have the body type, family history & so on, & I know it's related to Celiac. I was a running addict until my knees gave out, so I always thought that would be my ticket to bone health... now I'm worried! All that calcium I was taking too, that was probably not doing me a bit of good remaining unabsorbed... arghh!

I should just get tested & know for sure... but I'm so sick of doctors!

Leah

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I'm hoping the sources that say it isn't good are either comparing it directly to higher-impact activities like jogging-- there's no doubt that's better for bone-building, so long as your joints can take it!-- or assuming that people will take the "path of least resistance." On low resistance & low incline, the force required is much lower.

Now I am anxious to know, because unless my knees get well as my gluten issues fade, the E will be my mainstay for cardio forever. I haven't been diagnosed with osteoporosis (haven't been tested) but I have the body type, family history & so on, & I know it's related to Celiac. I was a running addict until my knees gave out, so I always thought that would be my ticket to bone health... now I'm worried! All that calcium I was taking too, that was probably not doing me a bit of good remaining unabsorbed... arghh!

I should just get tested & know for sure... but I'm so sick of doctors!

Leah

The elliptical is a great aerobic exercise, but it's not weight-bearing. A weight-bearing exercise is something that increases the load on your bones above what gravity is, as weight-training does. An elliptical, due to the fact that it is very low impact, will only minimally effect your lower body this way, and you really want something to start to build up your back and shoulders.

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I have 3 pound weights that I strap to my ankles. It makes anything you do, walking, jogging, even sitting in a chair watching T.V. doing some leg lifts, all weight bearing. :) I do the eliptical 3X a week for about 1/2 hour with these weights on my ankles and using a high resistance. It is absolutely weight bearing. To start you could get 1 pound weights for your ankles and when you walk or jog you could carry or strap 1 pound weights also to your wrists. After you get used to these you can gradually go up to the 3 pounds. I am 5'5 and weigh about 120, the 3 pound wieghts are perfect for me, maybe because you are smaller I would stick with 1 or 2 pound.

Wendy :)

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Thanks for all your suggestions!

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Is pilates weight bearing?

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The elliptical is a great aerobic exercise, but it's not weight-bearing. A weight-bearing exercise is something that increases the load on your bones above what gravity is, as weight-training does. An elliptical, due to the fact that it is very low impact, will only minimally effect your lower body this way, and you really want something to start to build up your back and shoulders.

Did you read my post above, about the resistance? I don't understand how this differs from weight training. True, there is no actual additional weight, but the force required to push against the resistance simulates the additional force of carrying weight. Just from the physics of it, it would seem similar to leg presses.

I do an upper-body program with free weights too, & my elliptical also has u-b bars. I'd like to see the data on ellipticals. I really suspect the resistance is crucial.

Leah

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Im 15 and under weight and I recently had a bone scan that showed I had low bone density. I know I have to do weight bearing exercise besides intaking calcium, but I'm not sure if what Im doing is enough (elliptical 30-40 min, 3-6xs a week and weight training with a trainer 1hr and 15 min, 2xs a week).

dont know if this is fact but a trainer told me this, apparantly 10 mins of skipping each day will beat off osteoperosis, please if anyone knows this is wrong please let me know. maybe this can help.

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dont know if this is fact but a trainer told me this, apparantly 10 mins of skipping each day will beat off osteoperosis, please if anyone knows this is wrong please let me know. maybe this can help.

If your joints can take it, skipping rope is fantastic for bone-building. But be very careful, wear supportive shoes, & jump on a giving surface if possible so you don't wreck your knees like I did! I used to love skipping, when younger I'd go into a sort of skipping trance, felt like I could go on forever. Now if I try it my knees howl for mercy! Oh well. Fun while it lasted.

Leah

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Is spinning a weight bearing exercise, if so i'll start taking teh classes my gym offers

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The elliptical is a great aerobic exercise, but it's not weight-bearing. A weight-bearing exercise is something that increases the load on your bones above what gravity is, as weight-training does. An elliptical, due to the fact that it is very low impact, will only minimally effect your lower body this way, and you really want something to start to build up your back and shoulders.

Weight-bearing exercise means, quite literally, exercise where you are bearing your own weight. Therefore, the only exercise that is not weight-bearing is swimming. Impact is another ballgame--exercises like biking, elliptical training and skiing are no-impact because your feet are never lifted--literally, no impact. Walking is low-impact, as your feet leave the ground and return with a relatively low force. Running and jumping are high.

Apparently the best exercise for keeping bones dense is high-impact. Weights are crucial as well for different reasons.

I just got results back from my first bone-density scan. For my age group, I am normal-low, and will need to be watched over the next few years. And I've been a regular runner forever! Such is life with so many years of untreated celiac....!

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... Impact is another ballgame--exercises like biking, elliptical training and skiing are no-impact because your feet are never lifted--literally, no impact. Walking is low-impact, as your feet leave the ground and return with a relatively low force. Running and jumping are high.

Apparently the best exercise for keeping bones dense is high-impact. Weights are crucial as well for different reasons. ...

I'll quibble on the skiing in the case of downhill - due to the bumps an irreguarities in the surface, skiing is actually medium-impact. There are constant mini-jumps. (X-country is different, of course.)

That vibration along the direction of the bone is a powerful stimulation to bone growth. (Lifting weight will not do anything to simulate this, though.)

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You've got me motivated to skip rope if I can find one. Skipping alone may look silly for me. I've got to exercise more and work on the ole' bones. Thanks for motivating me. I've just been walking and not enough of that. LL

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Skipping is terrific!...Get a good sports bra... :)

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Sooo I think I got lost along they way... running on my treadmill good for bones or not?

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