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What Exactly Is Magnesium Stearate
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on a number of supplements I'm taking, magnesium stearate is listed as one of the items the supplement is "free of" along with gluten, casein, preservatives, artificial colors, etc.... why is it listed here?

the reason I ask is a new supplement I was recommended to take (a digestive enzyme) has magnesium stearate and none of the supplements I'm currently taking have it...

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I don't know. Magnesium stearate is in two of the supplements I take. I will have to look it up!

I got this from Wikipedia:

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Magnesium stearate, also called octadecanoic acid, magnesium salt, is a white substance which is solid at room temperature. It has the chemical formula C36H70MgO4. It is a salt containing two equivalents of stearate (the anion of stearic acid) and one magnesium cation (Mg2+). Magnesium stearate melts at about 88 °C, is not soluble in water, and is generally considered safe for human consumption. Because it is widely regarded as harmless, it is often used as a filling agent in the manufacture of medical pills. In this regard, the substance is also useful because it has lubricating properties, preventing ingredients from sticking to manufacturing equipment during the compression of chemical powders into solid pills. It is also a common ingredient in baby powders. In pure powder form, the substance can be a dust explosion hazard, although this issue is effectively moot beyond the manufacturing plants using it.

When used as a filling agent in the manufacture of pills, such as vitamins, the source of this ingredient is typically beef. However, there is an increasing number of vegetarian options in which the product specifically indicates it contains magnesium stearate from vegetable sources.

Maybe it is because it is usually derived from beef that causes it to be listed as "free of" on some supplements. I'm sure vegans would not like to be taking supplements that have beef stuff in them!

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Thanks for the info. I always wondered as well.

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If others have heard of it, have any of you found it to be safe? I just had some unfamiliar blended yogurt (but the ingredients SEEMED fine) and a new prescription for folate containing Maltodextrine and vegetable magnesium stearate, among other ingredients. One of the two, can't tell which, just made me sick. Any guesses?

Not sure how to react if the folate I've been prescribed for my malnutrition causes a celiac reaction... laugh or cry?

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why is magnesium for celiacs nessary?

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magnesium stearate is a lubricant. The only purpose it serves is to make the materials that go into the capsules move smoothly down the equipment. It is toxic and should be avoided. I am in the process of changing out ALL of my supplements that have it with supplements without fillers. Yes they are more expensive, but do I really need to be filling my body with toxic industrial lubricants everyday? No I dont.

Pure Encapsulation is a good place to look. I have found a few others too that dont use the fillers.

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It is toxic and should be avoided.

Shay, please provide your source for this allegation.

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I feel like I am on trial. ;)

If you type in "Magnesium Stearate" + "toxicity" you will find TONS of data about this toxic substance. Here is ONLY ONE of the MANY:

www.sciencelab.com/xMSDS-Magnesium_stearate-9927217

Pay particular note to "Section 3". If that doesnt make you take pause, I dont know what will.

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Potential Chronic Health Effects:

CARCINOGENIC EFFECTS: Not available.

MUTAGENIC EFFECTS: Not available.

TERATOGENIC EFFECTS: Not available.

DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY: Not available.

The substance may be toxic to liver, skin.

Repeated or prolonged exposure to the substance can produce target organs damage.

***Those last two warnings are ominous enough to me. "Repeated" or "Prolonged" exposure....like taking supplements everyday??? Yup.

And when it says "Not Available.".....it just means that it has not been studied yet. No one has done the experiments to determine if it causes cancer or birth defects, etc. Doesnt mean it doesnt.

So far, they just know it can cause liver and skin toxicity and target organ damage.

Who wants that?

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Magnesium is necessary because most Americans are deficient due to lack of dietary intake (not enough green leafy veggies for one). And a Celiac is more likely to have malabsorption on top of that.

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The statement quoted did not explain what is considered prolonged or even what kind of exposure they are talking about, and the mere mention of the ingredient in a supplement doesn't tell us the amount.

I have no obvious problem with magnesium stearate. I cannot afford more expensive supplements at this time so will continue to use them with this ingredient listed. I am glad to find out the source is beef. If it's a vegetable source, it is likely corn (my assumption, would have to ask), and that would be a problem for me.

However, if the ingredient would be calcium stearate, that's another story. My gut does not like this and gets rid of it pronto. Took a long time to discover this - couldn't understand why I couldn't tolerate some supplements and could others. A chiropractor suggested it might be a problem, and sure enough, that was it.

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Q: What is the difference between a nutrient, a drug, and a toxin?

A: Dosage.

:unsure:

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Magnesium stearate is an immune suppressant......which is never a good thing.

If you're in good health and taking a couple supplements which contain magnesium stearate.....it probably isnt a big deal.

However, if you already have an immune system which is struggling and you already have health problems a little bit of toxin several times a day probably isnt too good for your body.

Some of us do have compromised immune systems and are more susceptible to toxic ingredients in foods, medications and supplements.

I have a hard time finding supplements which do not contain stearates. If I were taking alot of supplements (with most of them containing magnesium stearate) this would be a big problem for me. Right now I'm not taking many supplements and the ones which I do take do not contain magnesium stearate.

Since becoming sick I've always had problems with anything containing magnesium stearate....but only found out a few months ago that it is considered to be toxic. My body doesnt handle toxins very well...at any dose.

magnesium stearate = "toxic excipient"

Its also not good for people who have impaired digestion (most of us here). It reduces the absorption of the nutrients in the supplement.

While toxicity is one problem, decreased absorption is another. In a study published in the journal Pharmaceutical Technology, the percent dissolution for capsules after 20 minutes in solution went from 90% without stearates to 25% with stearates. This delays the absorption of nutrients. Individuals with impaired digestion may have particular difficulty absorbing nutrients coated with stearates.

Another problem with stearates: concentrated doses of stearic acid suppress the action of T-cells, a key component of the immune system. The article

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