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Flu-like Symptoms From Quitting Smoking


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#1 eleep

 
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Posted 20 August 2006 - 10:38 PM

I've quit smoking several times in the past and my experience up until this time has always been that dealing with the anxiety for the first week or so was the worst part of quitting. I don't smoke when I hike or paddle, so I generally quit every time I had an overnight trip -- the exercise alleviated any accompanying stress.

Now, however, I'm in a different position and, although I've been under a LOT more stress than usual recently, it's been very easy just to quit this time without needing to go out into the woods to do so. Anxiety hasn't felt like a huge issue because this feels like nothing compared to gluten-related anxiety.

However, I was smoking more than usual for a few months post-breakup and my body has a bit of recovery to do -- I've started having major flu-like symptoms which I know are nicotine withdrawal symptoms -- a sore throat, fatigue, achey & drainy feeling ears, etc. (I'm pretty sure I haven't been exposed to anything).

Does anyone have recommendations for dealing with these -- or know how long it takes to get through them? I'm trying to drink lots of water and, of course, I'm doing the usual supplementation things I always do -- but are there specific foods or supplements that might help this process along? Part of me just wants to get into bed with some chicken soup, but I don't know whether that's the best way to treat this or not.

I'm getting lots of exercise -- running daily and doing lots of yoga.

eleep
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Erica

Inconclusive blood test results
Positive Enterolab results
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gluten-free since 2/10/06

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#2 gfp

 
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Posted 21 August 2006 - 02:29 AM

It sounds like you are doing everything right.

Just remember to value the experience.... your goal is to feel normal again but your body has a feeling of normal associated with nicotine. Any nicotine you have now will just reset the process .....

The worst physical part is already over.... what you are left with are ghost memories of how to "feel good" again.... its just your body playing tricks on you. It can be very convincing but its not smart.... it just replays the same "give me nicotine" ... imagine it is a little "devil" in your stomach... the little devil that nagged you for every cigarette ... right now that little Devil is dying and getting weaker and weaker, its fighting for its life because it knows a little longer and it will be gone.... so its trying harder than ever but its getting weaker and weaker.
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Fere libenter homines id quod volunt credunt. (JC, De Bello Gallico Liber III/XVIII)

#3 eleep

 
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Posted 21 August 2006 - 08:56 AM

Grrr, this feels hellish. I have absolutely no interest in smoking again, but there are all sorts of emotional things coming up that the smoking was kind of holding at bay these past few months. On the other hand, I still look better than I ever have.
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Erica

Inconclusive blood test results
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gluten-free since 2/10/06

#4 gfp

 
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Posted 21 August 2006 - 09:05 AM

Grrr, this feels hellish. I have absolutely no interest in smoking again, but there are all sorts of emotional things coming up that the smoking was kind of holding at bay these past few months. On the other hand, I still look better than I ever have.

Try personifying that "little devil" .. learn to detest it ... but don't diefy it. All it is is a nagger... it nags at you and hopes to break down your resolve. It has it in for you.... but each and every day you ignore it it becomes weaker, its not a deity, its a parasite, just one you have created but it took years to grow and it will take a week or month to really kill it.
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Fere libenter homines id quod volunt credunt. (JC, De Bello Gallico Liber III/XVIII)

#5 ravenwoodglass

 
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Posted 21 August 2006 - 02:42 PM

I've quit smoking several times in the past and my experience up until this time has always been that dealing with the anxiety for the first week or so was the worst part of quitting. I don't smoke when I hike or paddle, so I generally quit every time I had an overnight trip -- the exercise alleviated any accompanying stress.

Now, however, I'm in a different position and, although I've been under a LOT more stress than usual recently, it's been very easy just to quit this time without needing to go out into the woods to do so. Anxiety hasn't felt like a huge issue because this feels like nothing compared to gluten-related anxiety.

However, I was smoking more than usual for a few months post-breakup and my body has a bit of recovery to do -- I've started having major flu-like symptoms which I know are nicotine withdrawal symptoms -- a sore throat, fatigue, achey & drainy feeling ears, etc. (I'm pretty sure I haven't been exposed to anything).

Does anyone have recommendations for dealing with these -- or know how long it takes to get through them? I'm trying to drink lots of water and, of course, I'm doing the usual supplementation things I always do -- but are there specific foods or supplements that might help this process along? Part of me just wants to get into bed with some chicken soup, but I don't know whether that's the best way to treat this or not.

I'm getting lots of exercise -- running daily and doing lots of yoga.

eleep


If some gluten free chicken soup helps along with a lazy day doing things only you want to do --then do it. You have overcome a major addiction and should do what you need to feel better. You are doing all the right things, drinking lots of water and excercise. Make sure your vitamins have high levels of the B's that will help with the stress. Most importantly reward yourself when you feel like it, you deserve it.
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Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying
"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)


celiac 49 years - Misdiagnosed for 45
Blood tested and repeatedly negative
Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002
Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis
All bold resoved or went into remission with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002
Some residual nerve damage remains as of 2006- this has continued to resolve after eliminating soy in 2007

Mother died of celiac related cancer at 56
Twin brother died as a result of autoimmune liver destruction at age 15

Children 2 with Ulcers, GERD, Depression, , 1 with DH, 1 with severe growth stunting (male adult 5 feet)both finally diagnosed Celiac through blood testing and 1 with endo 6 months after Mom


Positive to Soy and Casien also Aug 2007

Gluten Sensitivity Gene Test Aug 2007
HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)




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