Get email alerts Get Celiac.com E-mail Alerts  




Celiac.com Sponsor:
Celiac.com Sponsor:




Ads by Google:






   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

Interesting Article On Soy Intolerance
0

2 posts in this topic

Soy Intolerance Full Article

History: The typical presentation is that of an infant who develops atopic dermatitis or cow milk protein intolerance, which resolves with substitution of a soy formula but recurs 1 or 2 weeks later. Parents may report a recrudescence of dermatitis or GI symptoms. Usually, the infant presents with watery diarrhea and vomiting.

Soy protein intolerance may cause different clinical syndromes, both IgE- and non–IgE-mediated. These reactions include the following:

Rhinitis

Urticaria or angioedema

Asthma

Anaphylaxis (rare)

Atopic dermatitis

Enterocolitis syndrome

Intestinal atrophy (malabsorption syndrome)

Eosinophilic gastroenteritis

Allergic proctocolitis

In susceptible individuals, the ingestion of soy proteins may cause the following:

Protracted diarrhea

Carbohydrate intolerance

Failure to thrive

Some children present with atopic dermatitis as a major symptom; however, most patients present with profuse vomiting and watery diarrhea.

The symptoms usually begin within 2 weeks of the infant's first feeding with soy-derived milk.

Sometimes mucus can be present in the stools, but blood is rarely noted.

Even if frank manifestations of colitis are absent, inflammatory changes in the colonic mucosa are frequently encountered.

The infant is usually dehydrated, and sometimes signs of malabsorption appear.

Small-bowel atrophy has been documented in different studies.

The degree of villous atrophy may be similar to that of celiac disease.

The mucosal damage causes malabsorption, hypoalbuminemia, and failure to thrive.

Some infants can present because of red blood mixed in stools. These infants usually appear healthy, and hematochezia is the only symptom.

Physical: The physical examination findings depend on the clinical picture and the duration of symptoms.

The most frequent presentation is enterocolitis syndrome; therefore, the infant appears dehydrated, with weight loss and sunken eyes.

In case of proctocolitis, the infant usually appears healthy and has normal weight gain.

In the less frequent case of soy-induced enteropathy, the infant has a low weight-to-length ratio and usually presents with dystrophia.

The signs and symptoms are related to the degree of the malnutrition. For example, edema is related to hypoalbuminemia; dermatitis enteropathica, to low zinc level; and rickets, to vitamin D deficiency.

Causes: All soybean proteins and foods currently available for human consumption contain significant amounts of the isoflavones daidzein and genistein, either as the unconjugate form or as different types of glycoside conjugates.

The isoflavones have structural homology to steroidal estrogens; therefore, they are considered to be phytoestrogens, but little is known about their biological activity.

Unquestionably, isoflavone ingestion can elicit biological effects; however, isoflavones and their metabolites have biological properties that are quite separate from classic estrogen action.

Genistein is a potent inhibitor of tyrosine kinases and can interfere with signal transduction pathways.

The threshold intake of dietary estrogens necessary to achieve a biological effect in healthy adults appears to be 30-50 mg/d.

In soy flours and concentrates, isoflavone concentrations are relatively high (0.5-3 mg/g). In soy milk and soy infant formulas, the concentration of isoflavones is lower (0.3-0.5 mg/g), but it is 10,000-fold higher than the concentration found in breast milk. Moreover, the volume intake of these products is sufficient to account for a significantly high dietary intake of isoflavones.

Infants fed soy-based formulas have plasma concentrations of isoflavones that are 3000- to 22,000-fold higher than plasma concentrations of estradiol.

Even if these substances have a weak estrogenic activity compared with estradiol, they could have adverse effects; however, the concerns about the adverse role of phytoestrogens in the first months of life are exclusively theoretical. At this time, the very limited available evidence from adult and infant populations indicates that dietary isoflavones in soy infant formulas do not adversely affect human growth, development, or reproduction.

The results of a study that enrolled 48 children (mean age, 37 mo; range, 7-96 mo) suggest that long-term feeding with SPFs in early life does not produce estrogenlike hormonal effects.

Gastroenteritis

Gastroesophageal Reflux

Ulcerative Colitis

Other Problems to be Considered:

Gastrointestinal bleeding

Celiac disease

Malabsorption syndrome

Infectious colitis

Enteropathy

Cow milk protein intolerance

Autoimmune enteropathy

Intractable diarrhea of infancy

Intestinal infections

Enterocolitis

Intestinal infections

Cow milk protein intolerance

Inflammatory Bowel Disease

Proctocolitis

Anal Fistulas and Fissures

Meckel Diverticulum

Intestinal duplication

Intestinal hemangiomas

Intestinal infections

Cow milk protein intolerance

Inflammatory Bowel Disease

Other Tests:

Soy-induced GI symptoms are usually not IgE-mediated; therefore, both skin tests and determination of specific IgE in serum have a low diagnostic value.

RAST appears to be of poor predictive value. Many children with positive results do not react to challenge tests.

Prick tests have little predictive value. The acidic subunits of glycinin and beta-conglycinin appear to be present in reduced amounts or absent in some commercial soybean skin test extracts tested by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and immunoblotting. As a consequence, these commercial extracts are less sensitive than extracts of soy flour.

The challenge test with soy proteins, after an elimination diet, is the only reliable method of evaluating soy protein intolerance.

Procedures:

Endoscopy: During the workup for differential diagnoses, upper or lower GI endoscopies are often performed in patients with soy protein intolerance. Findings, however, are nonspecific, most commonly minimal, and, at times, even completely unremarkable. Accordingly, and because of the transient nature of the disorder, endoscopies are not considered essential.

Esophagogastroduodenoscopy

Macroscopically, only minimal erythematous changes may be observed.

Microscopically, any area (eg, lower esophagus, gastric body, antrum, duodenum) may or may not show signs of acute inflammation.

In a minority of patients, an infiltrate of eosinophils is observed.

When the clinical presentation is that of a malabsorption syndrome, the duodenal mucosa may have changes (eg, partial villous atrophy, crypt hyperplasia) indistinguishable from those of celiac disease.

Colonoscopy

Macroscopically, changes may vary from minimal erythematous segments, most commonly diffusely involving the distal colon, to severe inflammation with bleeding ulcers and loss of vascular markings.

Microscopically, nonspecific acute inflammatory changes are observed, typically indistinguishable from infectious colitis. Rarely, eosinophils predominate in the lamina propria.

I found this interesting. I am intolerant to soy. I posted a different article on soy allergy in the OMG I might be on to something page 402 or 403 I think. Not before page 400 for those interested in that.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Ads by Google:

Thanks, Andrea! I appreciate it. Hope you are having a great night.

xoxo

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
0

  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      103,656
    • Total Posts
      918,488
  • Topics

  • Posts

    • Might have Celiac.. so many symptoms and pain!
      It is too bad the doctor didn't advise you to take the blood tests before going gluten free.  There is a chance they could still be positive.....  But a good chance that being gluten-free for weeks will make them negative.   I Have not seen any medical evidence that Celiac disease is caused  by any other disease. It is a genetic auto immune disease.     Perhaps you should read some info from reliable source s like the Univ of Chicago Celiac Center?   http://www.cureceliacdisease.org/faq/how-much-gluten-should-be-consumed-prior-to-being-screened-for-celiac-disease/
    • Might have Celiac.. so many symptoms and pain!
      I have a requisition for blood tests, but there is no way that I am going back on gluten. The cramps and pain is horrendous. I've only been off for a couple weeks, and I'm also doing the IgG tests, not really sure what those will show.  I have suffered with hypoglycemia in the past, and when I wasn't overweight and always dieting, I guess celiac maybe didn't rear it's ugly head... until after I went through something difficult in my life and started eating more carbs and then gained weight. I was never officially diagnosed with diabetes, but have been in the "pre-diabetes' range for a while. And I read that Celiac is either caused by PCOS or PCOS causes Celiac... not sure...  
    • Might have Celiac.. so many symptoms and pain!
      Welcome Jane! If you seriously suspect celiac disease, you should get tested (blood test), but that means you must be eating gluten.  Even being gluten-free for as little as a few weeks can impact your tests results.  Here's more information: http://www.cureceliacdisease.org/screening/ In the meantime, it sounds like your blood sugar is wonky.  How often do you check your blood sugar?  Do you have a meter?   This is a good site that you might find helpful with your diabetes: http://www.phlaunt.com/diabetes/ I hope you feel better soon! 
    • Might have Celiac.. so many symptoms and pain!
      Hello. This is my first post. I am at my wits end at this point. I've been experiencing some pretty crazy symptoms and although I don't have a diagnosis yet, I suspect I may have Celiac. A few months ago I threw up after eating some pasta, I felt like I was going to pass out actually and it felt like I was going to die! I thought it was food poisoning..  Then I had some VERY BAD fatigue... I was driving once and I literally wanted to get out of the car and lie down on the pavement! It happened again about 3 weeks ago, I was in the store and fatigue hit me like a ton of bricks.. I had to leave!  I have been trying to lose weight so I stopped eating all wheat, bread, etc.... well what happened truly scared me. I take Metformin for PCOS/pre-diabetes by the way. Anyway, I woke up had something to eat and an hour later felt like I was going to collapse. My heart was beating so fast, thought I was having a heart attack! I went to the doctor and I nearly passed out again in the office, they gave me some sugar to bring up my blood sugar and then I felt okay. My neck feels swollen, and like there is something in my throat...  So I've been off gluten/wheat/bread/pasta..etc. for about 2 weeks. At first I felt kind of okay, hmmm... but now I am entering week 3 and I feel like I'm dying! The hunger is still bad... although not as horrendous as before stopping gluten... but the hunger just doesn't want to calm down. I eat and less than an hour later I'm hungry again.  Can someone provide some advice, thoughts, anything at this point that can help me figure out what to do next... I'm losing my mind and I feel so depressed    
    • Milling vs buying gluten-free flour
      Okay then you have a clean grain mill & can go to town. I have only done rice in mine because I found that either my husband or myself don't really car for the consistency or flavors imparted by things like coconut flour, nut flours, pea or bean flours. Mostly the hubs is the big stick in the wheel. I like nut flours but he doesn't. For rice flours, I would say it's cheaper to mill them but it's also messier & more time consuming. I understand my NutriMill is far less messy than most millers (according to reviews) but it's still messy. In fact, I take it outside when I'm going to use it & let the mess be out there until all the grinding is done. So for me, it's a trade off & I would say about even steven.
  • Upcoming Events

  • Blog Entries

  • Recent Status Updates

    • celiac sharon  »  cyclinglady

      Hello cycling lady, have you noticed my picture is showing up as you?  Have no idea why but it's rather disconcerting to see my picture and your words 😉  Do you know how to fix it?  You seem to have far more experience with this board than I do
      · 1 reply
    • Larry Gessner  »  cyclinglady

      Hi There, I don't know if there is a place for videos in the forum. I just watched "The Truth About Gluten" I think it is a good video. I would like to share it somewhere but don't know where it should go. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
      Here is the link if you have never watched it.
      https://youtu.be/IU6jVEwpjnE Thank You,
      Larry
      · 2 replies
    • ChiaChick  »  Peaceflower

      Hi Peaceflower, Just wanted to say thank you for the chat.
      · 0 replies
  • Who's Online (See full list)

  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      60,747
    • Most Online
      1,763

    Newest Member
    Jen5632
    Joined