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Feelings Of Becoming A Complete Obsessive-compulsive Freak


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#1 michelleL

 
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Posted 03 September 2006 - 06:09 PM

I feel like I am becoming a total obsessive-compulsive freak, always having to check and recheck things before eating, suspecting things having gluten when it is not very clear that it does, always on high alert.... Now I'm reacting - I think- to the stupid Whole Foods 365 Chicken Broth that was God-awful tasting, and which I later discovered is just some "broth" made of water cooked with chicken and chicken fat with added spices: carrot powder, onion powder, garlic powder and other spices. What the heck is carrot powder, anyways? AAaargghhh! You'd think of all places, Whole Foods would at least make a real chicken broth.

Anyways, yeah, so I'm feeling kind of freaky. Anyone else?

Also, it doesn't help when certain health professionals. ie. my pharmacist looks at me like I'm making this all up and questions me if I am certain about the gluten stuff....
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#2 GFBetsy

 
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Posted 03 September 2006 - 06:23 PM

a little off topic, but my sister assures me that the Pacific foods Chicken broth that is sold at Costco is WONDERFUL. And it says GLUTEN FREE right on the box.

OH! And Costco (at least here in Orem, UT) is now selling the Envirokidz cereals in a 3 pack. The outer box doesn't say Gluten Free, but the 3 boxes inside do . . . WooHoo! Especially because it is only 6.99 for a 3 pack, and the same size boxes at the health food store are $4 and up!
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#3 marciab

 
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Posted 03 September 2006 - 08:54 PM

I've been this way off and on. Especially since I don't have a positive biopsy or lab test. I am determined to keep gluten out of my life though. Even if it means inconveniencing (is that a word ?) a few pharmacists. :P

So, far, I have just told nurses, etc. that apparently I am a celiac since I no longer have seizures since getting off gluten.

It's hard to get used to though.

Sorry, I don't know about the broth you used, but I'd go with one that said gluten free on the label or make your own the next time you cook chicken.

Marcia
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Jan 1990 - Dx CFS/ME/FM (URI's, Ataxia, myoclonus, orthostatic hypotension, insomnia, brain fog, swollen lymph nodes, sore throat... ) Completely Disabled (housebound and bedridden at times)

2004 - Digestive pain all the time.

May 2004 - Hiatal hernia, erosive gastritis, gastroparesis (endoscopy)
August 2004 - Colon polyps, diverticulitus, internal hemorrhoids (colonoscopy)

No relief from Nexium, Prilosec, Protonix, Zelnorm, Miralax, Imodium, Lomotil ...
July 2005 - GP recommended WFDFSFEFCF + vegan (Also, anything that hurts free)
Immediately stopped needing naps and digestive pain reduced.

Sept 2005 - GFDFCFSFEF + chemical free - Immediately stopped feeling jittery / buzzing and digestive issues were much better.

June 2006 - Dx B12 and iron deficient. Started B12 injections and using cast iron pan.

August 2006 - MYOCLONUS GONE. (off Klonopin)
September 2006 - ATAXIA, INSOMNIA and Feeling like the floor was moving under my feet gone.

June 19, 2007 - Positive DQ2, Dx Celiac

October 2007 - Sleeping like a baby, waking up with energy, but still having fatigue/stamina issues

Nov 2007 - Started Paleo diet for chronic hypoglycemia

April 2008 - GTT normal. I'm no longer hypoglycemic. Started Low oxalate diet for kidney stones.

May 1, 2008 - Began salt loading for OI/NMH - noticed immediately muscle weakness was gone. I was sodium deficient but my labs don't reflect it. Still working on OI and PEM.

#4 Guest_~jules~_*

 
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Posted 03 September 2006 - 08:59 PM

yep, I feel like a freak too. I'm new to this and the other day I was obsessing over boullion cubes, I ate something cooked in boullion and didn't know it. So I spent the whole day worrying about it. Who would have thought a month ago I would be sitting around stressing out over boullion! I can't see how anyone with disease couldn't at one time or another feel a little trippy about the constant "checking" what we are eating, lol....
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#5 Nantzie

 
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Posted 03 September 2006 - 09:58 PM

Same here. We had a family barbeque today. Everyone pretty much knows about my gluten thing, and I know what's safe on first look, but then I have to wonder if my MIL used the same cutting board to cut the potatoes for potato salad that she used to cut the bread. Or what brand of BBQ sauce they used. And if they're grilling the bread too. Are they using the same tongs to turn the bread as they're using to turn the meat?

And then, the worst thing was that my SIL uses Bed Bath and Beyond Soaps for every d@mn room in the house, so I didn't even feel safe washing my hands because I've heard a lot of their stuff has gluten in it. I just used her dish soap and prayed that it wasn't gluteny for some reason.

If only would could just not eat the stupid bread and not have to worry about all of this piddly cr@p that we all have to obsess about.

AAAAAAAAAAAAAARRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRGGGGGGGGGGGGG!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Nancy
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The person who says it cannot be done should not interrupt the person who is doing it.
~Chinese Proverb

#6 Guest_cassidy_*

 
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Posted 04 September 2006 - 04:28 AM

I get freaked out sometimes. I went on a family trip and there was gluten everywhere. I must have washed my hands and my plates a million times. I think the worst for me is when I'm in an environment I can't control (not my house) and when I'm eating new food.

I would recommend getting some staples that you know you can trust. I have pretty much found a brand for everything I want to eat and I very rarely try something new.

Also, if you can make your food at home (pack a lunch for work and anywhere else you go) and don't eat out for a while, you might feel better.

This isn't in your head and you have to be very careful. I'm a drug rep and I eat lunch with doctors several times a week. They usually ask why I'm eating different food so I explain it to them. I can't tell you how many doctors have told me that this is extremely rare that they have never had a patient in 25 years. That I'm the most sensitive person they have ever heard of. I usually say check out celiac.com there are about 9,000 other people who have it and most of them seem to be as sensitive as I am.
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#7 jesscarmel

 
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Posted 04 September 2006 - 04:45 AM

i defintly have become obssessed with gluten but i have an anxiety disorder so im not suprised. i wont eat at anyones house yet except my parents and grandma. when i go to my brother in laws house i wont eat because they are kind of messy and the other day i was there and they were serving dinner and they put the spoon from the green beans in to the pasta bowl and served it, so i feel like i really cant trust anyone but myself and my family. i think ppl defintily think im crazy but i dont care because im not going to risk getting sick to make tohers more comfortable. i also dont let gluten in my house. if my fiannce wants to eat gluten food that he orders in he eats it on our porch. some might think this is to strict but i feel my house should be a place i know i can eat safely and not get sick.
i try not to obssess about it but i do so i know how you are feeling!
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Diagnosed in March 2006 after being in the hospital due to pancreatitis due to undiagnosed celiac
years of being told i had IBS, taking numerous IBS medications (since the age of fifteen)

#8 Corkdarrr

 
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Posted 04 September 2006 - 05:33 AM

I have what I call my OCD journal, in which I write everything I eat, and how I feel all day long (back pain, brain fog, extreme crankiness, etc). Including any exercise, medications (how much and what time).
This is in hopes that a few months down the line some strange pattern will emerge and I'll realize that I'm allergic to Snickers bars or situps (or something else that I like but am not in love with). And then all my problems will be solved in some strange Food Allergy Fairy Princess type of way. :rolleyes:

My mom told me to relax and not focus so much on it, but if I don't focus on it, then I mess up. Case and point when I got sick a few weeks ago I didn't even think to check the coughdrops (they were fine). But I just reverted into my 'I'm a regular person who's sick' mode.
I wish my life weren't consumed with food and ingredients and how my body is feeling at any given moment...but it is for a while now at least.

-Courtney
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Courtney - 25
Columbia, SC

Gluten-free since July 8, 2006
Casein-free since October 16, 2006
Went six weeks, and fell back into a deliciously painful world of cheese.
Casein-free (again and for serious this time) December 11, 2006
Stupid cheese addiction....2/07

Dx Hypothyroid in 1993
Dx Gluten & Casein Sensitive through Enterolab 10/06
Dx Adrenal *Exhaustion* 2/07




Originally from WI, I am still in denial over my newfound casein intolerance. I fear I will not be allowed back into the state if I can no longer eat cheese and drink milk. This could pose some trouble over holidays when I wish to visit my family. It also poses a problem involving the severe rage I feel when I have to throw away somebody's unfinished cheese sticks. That is so wrong.

#9 gfp

 
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Posted 04 September 2006 - 06:42 AM

I get freaked out sometimes. I went on a family trip and there was gluten everywhere. I must have washed my hands and my plates a million times. I think the worst for me is when I'm in an environment I can't control (not my house) and when I'm eating new food.

I would recommend getting some staples that you know you can trust. I have pretty much found a brand for everything I want to eat and I very rarely try something new.

Also, if you can make your food at home (pack a lunch for work and anywhere else you go) and don't eat out for a while, you might feel better.

OK, I was going to say this anyway ....

This isn't in your head and you have to be very careful. I'm a drug rep and I eat lunch with doctors several times a week. They usually ask why I'm eating different food so I explain it to them. I can't tell you how many doctors have told me that this is extremely rare that they have never had a patient in 25 years. That I'm the most sensitive person they have ever heard of. I usually say check out celiac.com there are about 9,000 other people who have it and most of them seem to be as sensitive as I am.


But should we laugh or cry????

Have you thought of carrying literature in your briefcase? Especially ones showing incidence in the US.
you could really educate a lot of Dr's very gently by "just having a copy" in your briefcase you were taking to read on the plane, car etc.
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Fere libenter homines id quod volunt credunt. (JC, De Bello Gallico Liber III/XVIII)

#10 eKatherine

 
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Posted 04 September 2006 - 07:00 AM

I have a doctor friend who tells me he's run a few celiac panels, but has never had a patient test positive. Although he acknowledges that 1 in 133 in the general population may be celiac, he fails to see the inherent contradiction - that he must have a lot of patients who are celiac, and many more that are gluten intolerant.

But thanks to the fact that he's really not looking for celiac - he's not a GI - he's not on top of things like the length of time a patient needs to be on gluten in order to get a positive biopsy. I'm glad he never had to tell a patient that, he thought a week was enough!
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#11 par18

 
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Posted 04 September 2006 - 07:52 AM

I feel like I am becoming a total obsessive-compulsive freak, always having to check and recheck things before eating, suspecting things having gluten when it is not very clear that it does, always on high alert.... Now I'm reacting - I think- to the stupid Whole Foods 365 Chicken Broth that was God-awful tasting, and which I later discovered is just some "broth" made of water cooked with chicken and chicken fat with added spices: carrot powder, onion powder, garlic powder and other spices. What the heck is carrot powder, anyways? AAaargghhh! You'd think of all places, Whole Foods would at least make a real chicken broth.

Anyways, yeah, so I'm feeling kind of freaky. Anyone else?

Also, it doesn't help when certain health professionals. ie. my pharmacist looks at me like I'm making this all up and questions me if I am certain about the gluten stuff....


I for one don't think being somewhat obsessive about this is a bad thing at all. In the beginning I was really obsessed with not getting any gluten in my diet. Guess what happened? I did not get any gluten in my diet. Not only that I have kept the gluten out of my diet since starting. The same thing that sometimes keeps us from relaxing and just letting whatever happens happen can also make us willing and disciplined enough to do something like this diet successfully. I feel that the expression that an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure fits our lifestyle perfectly. I mainly just use common sense when deciding what to eat or drink outside the home. I went to a cookout yesterday and had the burger and fixings without the bun with no problem. I was told the baked beans were ok so I ate them with no problem also. The people hosting the event were aware of my situation and I saw the way things were done and I was satisfied. I may be wrong but if something does happen and I get some gluten by accident I don't think it will cause me a lot of bad things for very long. Since the diet was the successful treatment for me to this point I would just go back home and pick up where I left off.

Anything I have done successfully in my life I attribute to my OCD nature. I believe in grabbing the bull by the horns and going full speed ahead until I either fail or succeed. The worst thing is that I would just have to start over again with a different approach. It is only when we quit trying that we truly fail. I seldom read labels much anymore as most of what I eat is naturally gluten free anyway.

For me the only fear I have with OCD is when I start to think of what "might" happen. The two worst words I can think of are "what if". If I can limit those feelings I think I will be fine. So far so good.

Tom
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#12 GFBetsy

 
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Posted 04 September 2006 - 08:45 AM

Adding to Tom's statement:

I think that it's the first year or so where things are the worst as far as the obsessive feeling goes. After that you just get into the habit of dealing with your diet and it becomes normal to you. Label reading becomes a lot easier as time goes on, and you also know (in general) the things that are on your OK list.
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#13 Swingin' Celiac

 
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Posted 04 September 2006 - 04:25 PM

Haha, this thread makes me smile :D because I'm really obsessive about gluten too (among a number of other things)! It's hard not to be. I guess it can be a good thing cause it's kept me accident-free (at least to the best of my knowledge) since my dx. Yeah and I love what jesscarmel wrote; I tend to have quite a bit of anxiety too. However, I don't think it's rationally necessary to not allow any gluten at all in your house as long as the proper cleaning methods are utilized. Though I do get nervous when I see crumbs on the counter or when my dad's BBQing both gluten-free and non gluten-free items at the same time (the gluten-free on a cleaned portion of the grill of course ;) ). I think the hardest part is that people rarely tend to understand why it's such a big deal to us and I know with my family at least it can cause a bit of tension and frustration. I guess that's just a sacrifice we'll have to deal with if we want to stay healthy, but we should also try not to let it compromise our mental health :D .
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Gluten-free foods taste better.

#14 Guest_cassidy_*

 
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Posted 05 September 2006 - 03:45 AM

Have you thought of carrying literature in your briefcase? Especially ones showing incidence in the US.
you could really educate a lot of Dr's very gently by "just having a copy" in your briefcase you were taking to read on the plane, car etc.


I really do try to educate them. I felt so good one day when the doctor ordered the panel on a patient in the hospital. They couldn't figure out why she had severe pain after eating and all sorts of other celiac symptoms. If I helped one person get diagnosed, then it is all worth it.

The only problem is one that I face everyday in my job -educating doctors is tough. They have more education than me and most of the time huge egos. You have to say things just right to get them to listen. Sometimes when I'm telling them how common celiac is or that I'm not crazy and everyone is sensitive, I start to lose credibility because they just think I'm crazy. Since these people are my customers I have to back down and preserve the relationship.

I hope that when a medicine gets approved for celiac that I will be able to sell it. Until we have drug reps talking to doctors everyday about celiac it won't ever be in the front of their minds. It is so frustrating to see how many doctors are not educated at all about it.
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#15 gfp

 
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Posted 05 September 2006 - 03:55 AM

I really do try to educate them. I felt so good one day when the doctor ordered the panel on a patient in the hospital. They couldn't figure out why she had severe pain after eating and all sorts of other celiac symptoms. If I helped one person get diagnosed, then it is all worth it.

The only problem is one that I face everyday in my job -educating doctors is tough. They have more education than me and most of the time huge egos. You have to say things just right to get them to listen. Sometimes when I'm telling them how common celiac is or that I'm not crazy and everyone is sensitive, I start to lose credibility because they just think I'm crazy. Since these people are my customers I have to back down and preserve the relationship.

I hope that when a medicine gets approved for celiac that I will be able to sell it. Until we have drug reps talking to doctors everyday about celiac it won't ever be in the front of their minds. It is so frustrating to see how many doctors are not educated at all about it.

Honestly I understand which is why i suggest printing out a few relevant papers ....make sure they are good medical ones and conveniently have them. Im presuming as a sales rep you travel... so just say you printed em out for your own use but finished with them.

If you wanna play then let the Dr's EGO work and ask them to explain the paper over lunch ....
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Fere libenter homines id quod volunt credunt. (JC, De Bello Gallico Liber III/XVIII)




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