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More Deaths For Caesarean Babies


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#31 AndreaB

 
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Posted 07 September 2006 - 07:22 PM

I've had three sections.

My first was my daughter. I was told she'd be small because I hadn't gained much weight. At 38 weeks we wound up in the hospital as I had started bleeding. It was determined that she was breech but the bleeding didn't continue. The doctor ordered me to couch potato status. One week later at our appointment I was having mild contractions and had started dilating. At that appointment they did a stress test and found that her heart rate dropped with every little contraction. It was determined that a c-section was necessary that day. So, we had three reasons for section....1)heart rate drop, 2)breech presentation, 3)partial abruption of the placenta. The doctor who did the surgery said it was old (the abruption). Don't know how old. If I had tried to have her naturally, I probably would have lost her. She had one foot down in the canal. Apgar, 9.

My second, my oldest son was a section by choice. I wasn't comfortable with the idea of a vbac. Turns out they had a hard enough time delivering his shoulders and I hurt because of that. He was the healthiest as far as apgar, 10.

My third, my youngest son was also a section by choice. No problems. His apgar was 8.

I had an easy recovery each time. My hardest was my second because I did too much too soon. I didn't go into labor with the others....false labor with second. I had a different diet with each, first was lacto-ovo, second was ovo and third was vegan. I had elevated liver enzymes before 3rd pregnancy, which I have since learned could point to celiac. They were fine before the birth according to the 7 month blood work they do.

My daughter choked on spittle while still in the hospital. My husband was there to clear her airways again. I don't recall having much of a problem with my second. My third had choking spells in the hospital. I stayed 3 days, 2 days and 2 days. I had wanted to stay 3 days with my last but a different doctor ordered me home. I didn't leave until that night so it was actually more like 2 1/4 days. They said once I was up on my own it was safe to go home.

What really floored me with my youngest is I wasn't able to nurse him for so long. It took them forever to do all the required baby stuff. I don't believe I nursed him until 4 hours after he'd been born. They may have given him to me before that....I forget. They did everything in the room so I was in the room with him. I much preferred getting them sooner with the other two though.
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Andrea

Enterolab positive results only June 06:
Me HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201; HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0301; Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (subtype 2, 7)
Husband HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201; HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0302; Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (subtype 2,8)



The whole family has been soy free since February, gluten free since June 2006.

The whole family went back to a gluten diet October 2011.  We never had official testing done and I decided to give gluten a go again.  At this point I've decided to work on making some gluten free things again, though healthwise everyone seems to be fine.  The decision to add gluten back in was also made based on other things I'd read about the 2nd sequence of genes.  It is my belief that we had a gluten intolerance, but thanks to things I've learned here, I know more what to keep an eye on.  If you have a confirmed case of celiac, please don't go back to gluten, it's a lifelong lifestyle change.


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#32 Michi8

 
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Posted 07 September 2006 - 07:40 PM

Child birth should be the kind of experience that is welcoming to that new little person. I hate how the medical world has made it a procedure instead of a natural process. I am thankful that the hospital and docs are there for women who need them, when there are complications. But, not every birth has to be text book. Every woman is different and every birth is different. And one last thing......I hate it when the doc's say they delivered the baby. All they do is stand there and wait. My husband caught both of our daughters, but I delivered them.

Lollie


It's really a shame how a natural process has been so medicalized. Hospitals and doctors are important for those who need additional medical care, but for a simple, healthy pregnancy and birth there is little need for medical intervention. However, a midwife does bring all the necessary tools for emergency situations, and can quickly assess whether a trip to hospital is necessary.

And it's so true about doctors doing nothing more than wait. I was so pleased to be able to deliver my own daughter (it was a waterbirth.) DH "caught" her head, and then I got to catch her as she slipped out and I immediately brought her to my chest. I got to see her and discover she was a girl before anyone else...she just lay in my arms and breathed...it was so peaceful. :) The midwives then did all the hard work of helping me through the last stage of birth, helping us to bed, checking my daughter over, bringing me some food and then doing all the cleanup. Nothing better than just settling into bed with baby for a good sleep right afterward.

Michelle
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#33 2kids4me

 
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Posted 07 September 2006 - 10:20 PM

I think midwives should be present at every birth - not just home births. I think they recognize fetal distress sooner than doctors. In a high risk delivery - they would be even more valuable as they support the mom and the baby in the hours afterwards too. .. they would have the knowledge and the TIME to explain things and calm mom - instead of a 5 min visit by a doc (and 3 mins is gloving up for the exam)...

There are situations that occur during delivery that are not predcitable and that is why many opt to deliver in hospital. Ther are hospitals that allow midwives to attend to a birth in hospital ... and then medical help is right there if they call the doctor... if intervention becomes necessary.
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Sandy

Type 1 diabetes - 1986
hypothyroid -1993
pernicious anemia
premature atrial beats
neuropathy
retinopathy
daughter is: age 15
central hypotonia and developmental delay
balance issues (rides an adult 3 wheel bike)
hypothyroid 1996
dermatographia - a form of angioedema 2002
celiac 2004 - by endoscopy
diagnosed Aspergers at age 7 - responded very well (HUGE difference) to gluten-free diet
recovered from Kawasaki (2003)
lactose intolerant - figured out in Oct/06
Gilberts syndrome (April/07)
allergy to stinging insects
scoliosis Jan 2008
nightshade intolerance - figured out April 2008
allergy to Sulfa antibiotics

son is 13
type 1 diabetic - 2003 diagnosed on his 9th birthday
celiac - 2004 by endoscopy
lactose intolerant - figured out Nov/06

#34 Michi8

 
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Posted 08 September 2006 - 05:24 AM

I think midwives should be present at every birth - not just home births. I think they recognize fetal distress sooner than doctors. In a high risk delivery - they would be even more valuable as they support the mom and the baby in the hours afterwards too. .. they would have the knowledge and the TIME to explain things and calm mom - instead of a 5 min visit by a doc (and 3 mins is gloving up for the exam)...

There are situations that occur during delivery that are not predcitable and that is why many opt to deliver in hospital. Ther are hospitals that allow midwives to attend to a birth in hospital ... and then medical help is right there if they call the doctor... if intervention becomes necessary.



I agree. I think midwives should be the standard caregiver for all women, and doctors brought in only as needed. They are cheaper, but provide a more in depth service to women...longer prenatal visits, get to know the mother and her needs/desires very well, and are more supportive through the process of labour. To have midwives for most births would go a long way to lowering the primary c/s rate. I think a Doula is important as well to help during labour (especially in a hospital...a midwife in hospital has her attention elsewhere much of the time due to hospital protocol, unlike in a homebirth.) I had a midwife for my second birth...when I needed the c/s she was there to support me during the surgery, and to advocate for me during and afterward (plus she took some great pictures.) :)

I personally think homebirth is the best choice, but it is not for everyone...you need to be very comfortable and confident with the natural process of birth.

Michelle
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#35 Guest_nini_*

 
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Posted 08 September 2006 - 05:46 AM

my daughter's birth story is a horror story of sorts... after pushing for THREE HOURS and trying every position in the handbook, I was begging them to get her out no matter what it took... the Dr. was too busy with delivering her BEST FRIEND'S baby in the next room... when she finally came in it was OMG we have to do an emergency c/s right now... when my daughter was delivered she was blue, wasn't breathing and had abrasions on her scalp from scraping against my pelvic bones for so long... She had a big head and my pelvic bones were too small and she was facing sunny side up instead of back so I had back labor to boot... fortunately they got her breathing and she's fine now but by God I tried to deliver her vaginally... hubby has a big head and I should have known I was in trouble! Plus because I was so overweight because of undiagnosed Celiac complications they assumed that I had big hips and a big birth canal. Just not so. This gives me the willies just typing this out but this is my experience... on the other hand my sister had two elective c-sections which totally blew me away... I couldn't understand that concept. Actually planning a c-section... well, the first one was because her son was breech, and the second one was because the Dr. refused to do a V-BAC but still... I'm the "natural" one the "hippie" so to speak and anything that reeks of medical intervention makes me crazy. I wanted to do homebirth with midwives but because I had such a complicated pregnancy and had a history with miscarriages they convinced me I'd be better off in a hospital... knowing now that I tried to do it without intervention and couldn't scares the hell out of me of what would have happened if I'd had my way and tried to have her at home??? Since both of us nearly died in the hospital what would have happened at home? She was stuck and not coming out not even with the nurses ramming their arms in me up to the elbows trying to turn her around or pull her out... could a midwife have done any better? I don't think so. Admitedly my experience is extreme but I'm thankful for the c-section and I think it saved both of our lives.
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#36 Michi8

 
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Posted 08 September 2006 - 06:07 AM

my daughter's birth story is a horror story of sorts... after pushing for THREE HOURS and trying every position in the handbook, I was begging them to get her out no matter what it took... the Dr. was too busy with delivering her BEST FRIEND'S baby in the next room... when she finally came in it was OMG we have to do an emergency c/s right now... when my daughter was delivered she was blue, wasn't breathing and had abrasions on her scalp from scraping against my pelvic bones for so long... She had a big head and my pelvic bones were too small and she was facing sunny side up instead of back so I had back labor to boot... fortunately they got her breathing and she's fine now but by God I tried to deliver her vaginally... hubby has a big head and I should have known I was in trouble! Plus because I was so overweight because of undiagnosed Celiac complications they assumed that I had big hips and a big birth canal. Just not so. This gives me the willies just typing this out but this is my experience... on the other hand my sister had two elective c-sections which totally blew me away... I couldn't understand that concept. Actually planning a c-section... well, the first one was because her son was breech, and the second one was because the Dr. refused to do a V-BAC but still... I'm the "natural" one the "hippie" so to speak and anything that reeks of medical intervention makes me crazy. I wanted to do homebirth with midwives but because I had such a complicated pregnancy and had a history with miscarriages they convinced me I'd be better off in a hospital... knowing now that I tried to do it without intervention and couldn't scares the hell out of me of what would have happened if I'd had my way and tried to have her at home??? Since both of us nearly died in the hospital what would have happened at home? She was stuck and not coming out not even with the nurses ramming their arms in me up to the elbows trying to turn her around or pull her out... could a midwife have done any better? I don't think so. Admitedly my experience is extreme but I'm thankful for the c-section and I think it saved both of our lives.



I don't know if a midwife could have "done any better," but she likely would have been supporting you during labour unlike your preoccupied doctor, and would have known when it was time to transfer to hospital and/or consult a doctor. Though it sounds like hospital was a good choice given your history...there is a point where midwifes must defer to a doctor, especially with certain complications of pregnancies. When it comes to midwifery, the standard of care is different/better. To choose a midwife is not to put yourself into a risky situation...they are trained birth professionals, and many midwifes also have experience as L&D nurses to boot. BTW, they would have also known that the weight of the mother doesn't change their bone structure (hip size or pelvic outlet.)

Michelle
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#37 Guest_nini_*

 
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Posted 08 September 2006 - 06:18 AM

thank you Michelle... yes a midwife probably would have been way more attentive to my actual needs than the Dr. that I was stuck with. She wasn't even my regular Dr. he was out of town and she was the on call Dr. at the time. Shortly after my experience with her, she was fired from the practice... I wonder why. ;)
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#38 chrissy

 
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Posted 08 September 2006 - 07:00 AM

personally, i would never have even considered a mid-wife or a home birth. 2 of my children would have died before delivery if there had not been a monitor on me full time. they were in trouble, but if someone had only been listening to heart tones periodically, they might not have realized how much trouble they were in. i think a couple of my other children would have died dudring delivery if they had been home births. i am not a fan of home births.
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Christine

15 year old twins with celiac, diagnosed dec. 2005
11 year old daughter with celiac diagnosed dec 2005
17 year old son with celiac gene

#39 gfp

 
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Posted 08 September 2006 - 07:08 AM

personally, i would never have even considered a mid-wife or a home birth. 2 of my children would have died before delivery if there had not been a monitor on me full time. they were in trouble, but if someone had only been listening to heart tones periodically, they might not have realized how much trouble they were in. i think a couple of my other children would have died dudring delivery if they had been home births. i am not a fan of home births.

Yes but you obviously needed specialist attention.
I don't think anyone is saying home births are for everyone but they are safer today than ever because of all the pre-natal technology.
We have ultrasound and much more so that those who need special attention should be pre-identified.
Equally as many have said midwife doesn't have to mean home birth....

Obviously Im not a gal but I think if I was I'd rather have an experienced midwife with me as well.
I don't think from what everyone has said that the jobs are similar between the MD and the midwife and indeed complimentary.
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Fere libenter homines id quod volunt credunt. (JC, De Bello Gallico Liber III/XVIII)

#40 hannahsue01

 
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Posted 08 September 2006 - 07:43 AM

To each her own I guess. Every mother has the right to dicide for herself what it is she wants for herself and her baby. Often mothers have no choice as somthing goes wrong. I myself can not understand why a mother would choose to have a c-section by choice....from what I hear a vaginal delivery is much easier to recover from. With my personal experiences I would never choose to have a baby without being in a hospital. There just isn't the same help or monitering devices at home as there is in a hospital. I personally have had 2 c-sections but would have prefered not to have........the recovery is absolutly horrible. My first girl was bron after about 18 hrs of laboring via c-section. My water had broke and that is what sent me to the hospital...they had to deliver her after 18 hrs of being on patosion (terrible stuff) because I would not contract on my own....I never even got to 1 cent dialated. I guess they prefer to deliver a baby within 24hrs of the water breaking due to increased risk of infection for the baby. My second baby I delivered at 29 weeks gestation due to a placental abrubtion via c-section...if she would not have been delvired she would have died (scariest day of mine and my husbands lives). I think a midwife is a wonderfull idea as long as they are in a hospital were if somthing goes wrong you and your baby can get imediate help.
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Myself-Age 25....I have had symptoms since at least 1998 if not since infancy (was diagnosed with malnutrition as a small child)...Positive results with gluten free diet!

Hannah-Age 5.....Has symptoms....Inconclusive blood tests....Positive diet response to both gluten free and lactose free!

Grace-Age 1.....Born at 29 weeks due to me having celiac....Has reflux and a feeding tube.

Husband-Not Celiac......has found that he does feel better when not eating allot of gluten.....is gluten free at home.

#41 Fiddle-Faddle

 
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Posted 08 September 2006 - 08:17 AM

Midwives weren't an option for me--I was classified as high-risk because ofpre-eclampsia during the first pregnancy, and I had severe hyperemesis for all three pregnancies, plus my oldest had heart defects.

I was lucky that the high-risk practice I chose had doctors who were actually much less interventionist that many regular practices that I have heard of. They truly only intervened with me when it was medically necessary, and they gave me choices (for example, the doc delivering my daughter suggested pitocin to speed things along after the epidural (which I did elect to have after 26 hours of labor), but allowed me to decline the pitocin when I told him I wasn't in any rush.
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#42 AndreaB

 
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Posted 08 September 2006 - 08:29 AM

A full abruption of the placenta would be scary. I know someone who went through that as well. I don't know how early her baby was. I only had a partial abruption and wasn't aware of it. They had wanted to do an external version (I think its called that) to turn her around but couldn't risk it.


I forgot to add that with one of the boy's (I think my last one) that the cord was wrapped around his neck also.

Obviously, I would have much preferred a vaginal birth and was also planning on no medication....it just didn't work out that way. My husband and I weren't comfortable with the idea of VBAC and I had talked to someone who had had one but said if she had read all the medical journals before she would have opted for a section. She worked in an HMO. I am one who had an easy recovery, even from surgery. I believe both the sections and vaginal births carry their own risks. Obviously sections would carry more most of the time due to the surgical nature of it.
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Andrea

Enterolab positive results only June 06:
Me HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201; HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0301; Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (subtype 2, 7)
Husband HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201; HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0302; Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (subtype 2,8)



The whole family has been soy free since February, gluten free since June 2006.

The whole family went back to a gluten diet October 2011.  We never had official testing done and I decided to give gluten a go again.  At this point I've decided to work on making some gluten free things again, though healthwise everyone seems to be fine.  The decision to add gluten back in was also made based on other things I'd read about the 2nd sequence of genes.  It is my belief that we had a gluten intolerance, but thanks to things I've learned here, I know more what to keep an eye on.  If you have a confirmed case of celiac, please don't go back to gluten, it's a lifelong lifestyle change.


#43 2Boys4Me

 
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Posted 08 September 2006 - 08:41 AM

I had two hospital births, first with entinox(sp?) and morphine...they didn't help. I'm not a hero...I fully admit I asked for drugs. I had terrible back labour but thankfully the whole transaction from starting labour to meeting the baby was only four hours. I did have to push for an hour to get him out. I always say that "Walker came out punching and we've been fighting ever since." That hurts a bit - head and fist together. He was ten days late, so I was induced, some kind of gel on the cervix, I can't remember what it was called.

With Ty we went to the hospital at 3:30pm expecting to get sent home because the contractions were so inconsistent. Contractions started at 4:30am and were uncomfortable but not terribly painful yet. The nurse checked me and decided to let me stay. My doctor came and broke my water. Then she said she was going to go and watch her daughter's figure skating competition, and could I please have the baby by 11:30pm as she had an early morning appointment. (She winked and I didn't take it badly, she was just kidding around.) I wished her daughter luck and mentioned how the last time I had my water broken the baby was there within 90 minutes. Plenty of time, she said and she left - that was around 4pm. My husband went down to get the suitcase and fill in some forms and I hopped in the shower. When my husband got back he hung around for a while and I said go get the nurse this is really starting to hurt and I want my epidural. The nurse came and set up an IV. A few minutes later the doc doing the epidural showed up and we had a discussion about how in case he hadn't noticed, I was pregnant and couldn't possibly put my knees up to my chest, I couldn't even get them to my belly <_< . Clearly, he was insane. Then he put a needle in my back, pulled it out and had a nurse messing around on his tray looking for something else and I guess I screamed or something because the nurse checked me and said, "Do you want to push?" She had the epidural doc check me, he patted my shoulder and said, "No epidural for you today." and walked away. Ten minutes later I had a baby and ten minutes after that the doctor showed up. Then we had a laugh about how she could be home in time for supper. It was 5:30 when Ty was born.

All in all, I'd say both births were reasonable. No medical intervention necessary except a couple of quick stitches after each. The worst part of all is that when Walker was born, they had a light shining on my "nether regions" and some guy came in and had a look. "Ooooh. Angelo, have you seen this? That's an interesting laceration, are you waiting for Dr. Roy to come and fix this?" "Uh. Hello! Human being here! May I have something to cover my head with?" I don't need the whole class coming to look at my "interesting laceration"! <_< Yeesh.
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Linda, Mom to Ty (11 years old)
Ty was diagnosed by blood test June 7/05
biopsy Aug 11/05, diagnosis confirmed Aug 18/05
Mom, Dad and big brother Celiac-free.

#44 chrissy

 
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Posted 08 September 2006 - 08:53 AM

i think i'm pretty old fashioned because i prefer having a male doctor. i know that there are other women who would prefer a female doctor or a mid-wife.

i think that each of our opinions are shaped by our life's experiences. if i had been into "alternative" medicines and had successfully home deliveries, i'm sure that i would feel that home-birthing with mid-wives was the way to go. but, i've had scary deliveries and i've known people who's children have been damaged or have died with home deliveries, so that is where i am coming from.

i thought that it used to be that doctors would not do a c-section without a medical reason for doing one, but if you had already had a c-section you could opt to do another. i was certainly glad to have the option of doing a vbac----i much preferred vaginal delivery over c-section, it just didn't work out the last time.
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Christine

15 year old twins with celiac, diagnosed dec. 2005
11 year old daughter with celiac diagnosed dec 2005
17 year old son with celiac gene

#45 GFBetsy

 
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Posted 09 September 2006 - 10:08 AM

i think i'm pretty old fashioned because i prefer having a male doctor. i know that there are other women who would prefer a female doctor or a mid-wife.


I'll tell you one thing, the longer the doctor's fingers are, the less it hurts to have him/her check you!
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