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How Often Do You Eat Out?


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25 replies to this topic

#16 oreyes

 
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Posted 22 February 2004 - 03:00 PM

Hi Lorie Ann 13,
Thanks so much for the information about sandwich bread. I live in Oklahoma City and we have an Akins Health Food Store that carries several of the "Gluten Free Pantry" products. I'm not sure about that particular bread mix but I have one of their (The Gluten Free Pantry) catalogs. You said you "have to make it yourself". Do you use a bread machine or just the oven? I've both, so that wouldn't be a problem. All the breads that I've tried seem to fall apart so hopefully this will be better. I'm not a big sandwhich eater but just to have an occassional slice of bread or to use it for a grilled hamburger would be great. It's been about three years since I've had a decent tasting slice of bread.
Guess we all have to stick together in this situation don't we!! I've really found this site so useful. I think I've learned more since I joined last month than I have in the past three years. Thanks again for your thoughtfulness..........Judy
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#17 tammy

 
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Posted 27 February 2004 - 05:15 PM

Hi jaimek,

I love the picture of the puppy! How did you do that? Anyway, regarding your dining experience, I had a similar experience. I went to two restaurants and ordered their salad with NO CROUTONS! Guess what, yes, and although I was very upset, I simply said please this will harm me and she took it back and brought out a new salad. I did explain that just removing the croutons will still make me sick. I do make a point to be more generous with my tips. But I have found that most waitresses are willing to relay messages to the kitchen staff but somewhere along the line mistakes can and do happen.

So I would not eat the onion ring. But I do understand how hungry you must have been and perhaps you felt awkward with your boyfriend's family. I would anyway. But I have worked too long and hard to get better that I will not contaminate myself, especially when dining out. B)
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#18 jaimek

 
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Posted 03 March 2004 - 01:03 PM

Hi Tammy. Thanks for the response. I actually did not eat the onion ring but ate the chicken that it was touching. My doctor already yelled at me for that one, but you learn from your mistakes. Since I never really had severe problems to begin with, it is hard for me to tell whether I ingested gluten or not. That is bad and good. I don't get sick but I also don't know if my body is healing correctly. Guess I will just have to wait to get my next endoscopy to see if my intestine is improving. As for the picture of the dog, all you do is go to "my controls" and then into "avatar settings." There are all sorts of pictures to choose from. Enjoy :)
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gluten-free since 2/6/04

#19 Taylor

 
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Posted 04 March 2004 - 10:07 AM

Mariann- that stinks that you had a bad experiance at Outback. I eat there quite a bit. The first few times I went I tried and tried to explain to the waitress that my food had to be gluten free, and that they had to be very careful. Then I realized they had a gluten free menu. When I request the menu they seemed to take my condition much more serious. I have two daughters, so when we go to McDonalds or any other fast foo chain I rearely even eat. I tried to get a hamburger patty and some fries once and the same person that was putting on the buns grabbed my patty and you could see some crumbs in it. I just don't feel comfortable at fast food restraunts. I have become accustomed to reciving a few stares as I pull out my small travel cooler with my gluten-free food in a restraunt.
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#20 vickim

 
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Posted 17 April 2004 - 02:10 AM

I am brand new to this site, but was diagnosed almost 2 years ago after 9 months of being extremely sick. Typical story, I'm sure. I was down to 100 pounds when my doctors finally figured it out. I have severe reactions to any gluten, so eating out was really scary at first. Now I am not at all shy about speaking to waiters and waitresses, and asking for the kitchen manager if I have any doubts about the waitperson's understanding of my needs. If I know in advance which restaurant I'm going to, I get a copy of the menu and call ahead and speak to the kitchen manager or chef. I even ask them to read the ingredients to me over the phone, so I know what to order before I get there. Fast food is a little trickier. I live in Hawaii where there is lots of Asian food, which means lots of soy sauce. Thai food is the easiest for me to order, because many of the dishes don't use soy sauce. Our local Outback has been very easy to deal with, and they now know me and are extra careful with my food. I don't hesitate to ask lots of questions or to send things back to the kitchen at any restaurant, and I have never encountered any resistance to this. Restaurant folks want you to have a good experience and come back again. Those who take good care of me get huge tips and a sincere thank you as I'm leaving the restaurant. I also contacted the manager of my local grocery store (Safeway), because they already stocked a lot of Bob's Red Mill products, many of which are gluten free. I specifically asked for sorghum flour, since I use it in a lot of my baking. The manager not only ordered that, but now stocks Red Mill gluten free baking mix and gluten free bread mix. The bread mix can be made right in my bread machine, and I use the baking mix as a direct substitute for flour in all my regular non-gluten-free recipes. What I miss the most since I've been on the gluten-free diet is the convenience of just running through the drive-through and grabbing a quick bite. If I don't have my own bread already made, I often use corn tortillas for sandwiches, kind of like wraps. Just zap them in the microwave for a few seconds to soften them up, and they work great for any sandwich filling you want to use.

It's nice to know there are others of you out there who have the same questions, concerns, and frustrations that I have. I'm looking forward to checking in frequently.
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#21 plantime

 
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Posted 17 April 2004 - 06:39 AM

I love to eat at a small place called 400 Grill. It is a Mom and Pop restaurant, owned and operated by one retired couple. Each meal is made individually, and all of the cans have ingredient labels that they let me read. They are careful if I specify what I cannot have, to not let it come near my plate. My son works a Sonic, so he helped me educate the people there about the difference between Atkins and CS.
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Dessa

The Lord bless you and keep you; the Lord make His face shine upon you and be gracious to you." Numbers 6:24-25

#22 tarnalberry

 
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Posted 17 April 2004 - 05:06 PM

eh... I ate out too much as a kid, so I don't really WANT to eat out. I don't let celiac disease stop me from going out to restaurants - but if it's a place I'm not sure of, I just eat ahead, and go for the company. Eating's a social event, and while I might not join in with the mechanics of eating, I can join in with the socializing. My husband goes out much more often than I do - often with coworkers at lunch (and if I go, the same thing applies - I go more for the company than the food and make other arrangements for my food), or getting takeout at the chinese place across the street.
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Tiffany aka "Have I Mentioned Chocolate Lately?"
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#23 Jo Ann

 
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Posted 18 April 2004 - 03:20 PM

My 11 yo grandson is the Celiac in our family; however, that doesn't stop us from eating out. More and more restaurants are becoming familiar with celiac disease. Many fast food chains (Wendy's, McDonald's, Steak & Shake, TGIFridays, etc. will serve meat products w/o the bun and can usually tell you if Fries are cooked in separate oil, etc. Plus Wendy's can provide a list of gluten-free products. At other restaurants my daughter or I talked to the chef/cook and explain the situation. Chicken, steak, chops, ground beef, can be cooked in separate pan or grill not used for other foods, baked potatoes are safe, Fries are good if cooked in separate oil, vegetables are usually ok, but applesauce, cottage cheese, fresh fruit, etc. can be substituted. We have even found a Mexican Restaurant (home cooked meals) that caters to my grandson's needs, and he loves Mexican. We have had good experiences at Outback Steak House. At first we were hesitant to approach the chef/cook, but found they are very willing to accommodate. With celiac disease becoming so prevalent, more restaurants are becoming aware of this problem. Of course, there are things my grandson would like, but can't have, but that's true at home, too. Regarding mac & cheese, we buy quinoa macaroni (& spaghetti) at the health food store and use Velveeta to make a cheese sauce. There are a number of gluten-free spaghetti sauces that are gluten-free free, and we use our failed bread recipes to make bread crumbs for the meatballs as well as meatloaf, chicken breading, etc. Sorry, didn't mean to rattle on so, but I don't like for people to be intimidated by celiac disease. Like any other health problem of this type, where there is a will there is a way. Don't deprive yourself of eating out -- just do a little investigation and don't hesitate to ask. By the way, my grandson was diagnosed at 9 mos of age, but we almost lost him before they discovered the problem. Today, he is a big, strong, healthy boy who is active in sports, takes his own cake to birthday parties, and his own lunches to sports camps, but this doesn't stop him and his friends don't mind. Hope this is an encouragement to you.
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#24 debmidge

 
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Posted 19 April 2004 - 02:25 AM

My husband was diagnosed 10/03 and still doesn't feel up to eating out. He's afraid that the restaurant will make a mistake and he'll end up eating something with gluten in it unknowingly and will feel sick, etc. He's even afraid of new foods I make at home, like unbreaded veal cutlets, sauted in a pan in plain butter/olive oil. This new diet/condition has put the fear of God in him.
I spoke to the man who owns our favorite restaurant that we used to go to, and he seemed less than interested in the gluten-free diet. He didn't know what celiac disease was despite being in the restaurant business for 30 years. He said he'd "try" to have gluten-free food for my husband and that the fry cooker was for fries only, but he insisted that his fries didn't have a gluteny coating on them. I didn't get a real good feeling myself when he & I had this conversation. He wouldn't take the CSA hand out that I was trying to give him.
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Husband has Celiac Disease and
Husband misdiagnosed for 27 yrs -
The misdiagnosis was: IBS or colitis
Mis-diagnosed from 1977 to 2003 by various gastros including one of the largest,
most prestigious medical groups in northern NJ which constantly advertises themselves as
being the "best." This GI told him it was "all in his head."
Serious Depressive state ensued
Finally Diagnosed with celiac disease in 2003
Other food sensitivities: almost all fruits, vegetables, spices, eggs, nuts, yeast, fried foods, roughage, soy.
Needs to gain back at least 25 lbs. of the 40 lbs pounds he lost - lost a great amout of body fat and muscle
Developed neuropathy in 2005
Now has lymphadema 2006
It is my opinion that his subsequent disorders could have been avoided had he been diagnosed sooner by any of the dozen or so doctors he saw between 1977 to 2003

#25 murda

 
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Posted 21 April 2004 - 12:46 PM

Jaimek -
I got diagnosed about 2 years ago. It's taken alot of learning and I continue learning everyday. If I notice contamination when I order in a restaurant I send it back now (my fiancee used to do it because i wouldnt speak up) and speak with the manager when I do. This way I know, hopefully, that the problem will be fixed not just covered up. A lot of what made me speak up was realizing how good I could feel when I was totally gluten-free, and I didn't want to get sick at all. Hope this may help. Also, don't be embarassed I found that the people around me who love me understand completely and also try to help 100%. I continue to eat out because I refuse to let this stand in my way of living my life the way I want to.

Someone asked about ordering foods online.
I order a lot of food online, mainly from the gluten free trading company. I live in Atlanta so I do have lots of health food stores around. But I have still found that some of the better tasting foods aren't carried anywhere, like BBQ sauce (which I usually buy from Outback now!) But I have never had problems ordering online. I also buy gluten-free beer online from New York, and it tastes pretty close to the way I remember beer. As far as hamburger buns and donuts and stuff like that I really prefer Kinnikinnick's foods.

Hope any of this may be useful. I've loved learning about more places to eat from all of you. This forum is wonderful. I wish it didn't take me so lond to find it!

Best Wishes, :)
MURDA
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#26 Jo Ann

 
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Posted 22 April 2004 - 11:55 AM

When eating out or away from home, if you question a food just ask to see the ingredients list. Most restaurants, vendors, etc. are more than glad to let you read the package list of ingredients. We have done this in restaurants, at food stands (hamburgers, hot dogs, ice cream treats, etc.). Many larger restaurants are learning about celiac disease, but smaller ones may not be as familiar. If someplace doesn't cooperate (like Ritter's Frozen Custard in our area), we make it off limits and share this info with our support group. Having celiac disease is something over which one has no control, but one can control how he/she is affected by it. My grandson is very careful about his diet, but he doesn't let it hold him back. When in doubt, he just doesn't eat that certain food, but there is always plenty of safe food available. Having celiac disease is an inconvenience, but not the end of enjoying good food. It's just another challenge that you can conquer!
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