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Test Results (mainly Non Celiac)
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These are translated as best i can from french...french in brackets in vase i made a mistake)

Normal ranges in brackets at end....

Haematology

Erythrocyte (hematies) 5.96 x10^6 /mm^3 (4.55-5.50) {over}

Haemoglobine (17.3 g/%ml) (13-17.5) (high?)

hematocrit (ratio) 52.6 (40-54) (high?)

VGM (VGM = Hématocrite / Nombre de Globule Rouge) 88.26 (80-100) (normal)

CCMH 32.89% (29-36) (concentration of corpisular medium haemoglobin)

TCMH 29.03 pg (26-33) ("potency" of average corpisualr haemoglobin)

Leukocytes (leucocytes) 9940 /mm^3 (4000-10000) (pretty high and I think I have a kidney infection)

compostion is

63% neutrophil, 1% eosinophil, 1% basophil,

29% lymphocytes, and 6% monocytes

Plaques = 295,000 /mm3 (150,000-500,000)

Immunology

C-reactive protein or CRP (liver?) 2.0mg/l (<8)

Blood biochem

Ferretin (181.5 micro g/l) (25-340) (pretty much normal iron levels)

Enzymology

Transaminaze AGOT/AST? (GOT/ASAT french) 20 ui/l (<38)

Transaminaze (SGPT/ALT) (GPT/ALAT french) 19 iu.l (<45)

Urine

Appearance yellow orange clear

No deposits

Presence of Albumin

No sugar

pH 6.0

Leukocytes : some isolated, non altered at 3000/ml

Erythrocyte (hematies) rare at 1000/ml

Casts non

Mucus non

Crystals mumerous calcium oxalates

Others absent

Bacteriology ... all sterile and negative

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Sorry, I'm not much help. The hemoglobin is all I really know since mine was tested all the time when I was pregnant -- yours is not technically high, but if you're taking iron, you probably don't need as much.

I've been reading a lot about adrenal fatigue. I came across something that said albumin in the urine is a sign of it. I can't quote where I read that, but almost everything I'm reading is written by MD's. Also, inflammation/infection is another sign of it. You might do a search on adrenal fatigue and see if anything relates to you. Also search adrenal burnout. If you had a kidney infection, you would most likely be VERY ill and have a high fever as they are very serious. Your adrenal glands are located right by your kidneys, so if it's lower back pain, it could be the adrenals, not the kidneys. I know mine hurt sometimes, kind of an achy hurt.

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Yeah the thing is I have a very nice but hypochondriac Dr.

I went with kidney pain and she ordered full tests and is worrie about a kidney stone.

So she also ordered ultrasound and some other stuff I can't read her handwriting (LOL)

this is kinda expensive so my idea is wait and see if its a kidney infection or not before paying out for ultrasound and other expensive testing. (I know the other stuff will be expensive because of the lab)

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These are translated as best i can from french...french in brackets in vase i made a mistake)

Normal ranges in brackets at end....

Haematology

Erythrocyte (hematies) 5.96 x10^6 /mm^3 (4.55-5.50) {over}

Haemoglobine (17.3 g/%ml) (13-17.5) (high?)

hematocrit (ratio) 52.6 (40-54) (high?)

VGM (VGM = Hématocrite / Nombre de Globule Rouge) 88.26 (80-100) (normal)

CCMH 32.89% (29-36) (concentration of corpisular medium haemoglobin)

TCMH 29.03 pg (26-33) ("potency" of average corpisualr haemoglobin)

Leukocytes (leucocytes) 9940 /mm^3 (4000-10000) (pretty high and I think I have a kidney infection)

compostion is

63% neutrophil, 1% eosinophil, 1% basophil,

29% lymphocytes, and 6% monocytes

Plaques = 295,000 /mm3 (150,000-500,000)

Immunology

C-reactive protein or CRP (liver?) 2.0mg/l (<8)

Blood biochem

Ferretin (181.5 micro g/l) (25-340) (pretty much normal iron levels)

Enzymology

Transaminaze AGOT/AST? (GOT/ASAT french) 20 ui/l (<38)

Transaminaze (SGPT/ALT) (GPT/ALAT french) 19 iu.l (<45)

Urine

Appearance yellow orange clear

No deposits

Presence of Albumin

No sugar

pH 6.0

Leukocytes : some isolated, non altered at 3000/ml

Erythrocyte (hematies) rare at 1000/ml

Cylinders non

Mucus non

Crystals mumerous calcium oxalates

Others absent

Bacteriology ... all sterile and negaite

All in all this looks pretty good (IMHO and my not always great memory) Are you a smoker? That might account for the high normal hemoglobin and hematocrit. The one thing I found significant especially with your thinking you have a kidney infection was this:

"Crystals mumerous calcium oxalates "

I believe this could be indicitive of kidney stones. Your doctor will know for sure.

I have had stones and they can be quite unpleasant. One thing you might want to do is to google high oxalate foods and see if you can eliminate them from your diet.

I should probably note that I am not a medical professional, celiac took care of that :angry: , so I can only give you my opinion based on past study.

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All in all this looks pretty good (IMHO and my not always great memory) Are you a smoker? That might account for the high normal hemoglobin and hematocrit. The one thing I found significant especially with your thinking you have a kidney infection was this:

"Crystals mumerous calcium oxalates "

I believe this could be indicitive of kidney stones. Your doctor will know for sure.

I have had stones and they can be quite unpleasant. One thing you might want to do is to google high oxalate foods and see if you can eliminate them from your diet.

I should probably note that I am not a medical professional, celiac took care of that :angry: , so I can only give you my opinion based on past study.

Yeah the calcium oxalates are indicative of having the chance to develop a kidney stone but equally the elevated Leukocytes in the blood and presence in urine seem to suggest a renal or urinary infection?

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Haematology

Erythrocyte (hematies) 5.96 x10^6 /mm^3 (4.55-5.50) {over}

Haemoglobine (17.3 g/%ml) (13-17.5) (high?)

hematocrit (ratio) 52.6 (40-54) (high?)

VGM (VGM = Hématocrite / Nombre de Globule Rouge) 88.26 (80-100) (normal)

CCMH 32.89% (29-36) (concentration of corpisular medium haemoglobin)

TCMH 29.03 pg (26-33) ("potency" of average corpisualr haemoglobin)

Leukocytes (leucocytes) 9940 /mm^3 (4000-10000) (pretty high and I think I have a kidney infection)

compostion is

63% neutrophil, 1% eosinophil, 1% basophil,

29% lymphocytes, and 6% monocytes

Plaques = 295,000 /mm3 (150,000-500,000)

Immunology

C-reactive protein or CRP (liver?) 2.0mg/l (<8)

Blood biochem

Ferretin (181.5 micro g/l) (25-340) (pretty much normal iron levels)

Enzymology

Transaminaze AGOT/AST? (GOT/ASAT french) 20 ui/l (<38)

Transaminaze (SGPT/ALT) (GPT/ALAT french) 19 iu.l (<45)

Urine

Appearance yellow orange clear

No deposits

Presence of Albumin

No sugar

pH 6.0

Leukocytes : some isolated, non altered at 3000/ml

Erythrocyte (hematies) rare at 1000/ml

Cylinders non

Mucus non

Crystals mumerous calcium oxalates

Others absent

Bacteriology ... all sterile and negaite

I think I can help, I am not a doctor but I do lab work for a living (mind you its on animals but the patho-physiology is the same!)

To address your concerns about the kidney - kidney infections are suspected when there is flank/back pain, fever and LOTS of wbc in the urine. Casts are common (casts are tube shaped cells originating in the kidney) and are increased in geriatrics and in kidney infections. Most of the time you would expect to see "wbc casts" in a patient with a kidney infection. Kidney or bladder stones are accompanied by blood in the urine (visible or microscopic depeding on the siize of the stone)- simply because if the stone is present it constantly aggravates/irritates the surrounding tissue. If no blood is present on microscopic evaluation - stones are less likely. Bladder infections are extremely bothersome as the bladder is so irritated, it feels like you have to pee every 5 mins, and the urethra also becomes inflammed so it feels like it burns when you pee. Bladder infections very rarely occur with fever - if fever is present then the infection is likely ascending (going up the ureter) to the kidney.

Anorexia is common with kidney and less common with bladder infections.

Bacteria causes the urine pH to change to alkaline (as do some foods) - 7 or above. A ph of 6 with no bacteria is pretty reliable evidence for ruling out infection. Howver just to confuse you more - you can have inflammation without infection. Meaning something is causing inflammation but it is not bacterial in origin.

The AGOT and SGPT are both sensitive indicators of liver function.

The RBC information is always looked at "as a whole". The ability of the rbc to hold hemoglobin and the size of the rbc can point towards a specific anemia or iron deficiency - in that the hematocrit may be within normal range but abnormailites in the size of the red cell (mean corpuscular size) or the amount of Hgb it can hold can be very informative. Often high normal results are just that - high NORMAL - they are looked at in relation to clinical signs. eg: we geta dog in with vomiting and they have high normal hematocit - this may indicate the dog is becoming dehydrated. If we saw the same result (high normal) in a dog being evaluated for a pre-surgcial workup - then we would not be alarmed.

The wbc or leukocyte count is within normal range. In a kidney infection - these numbers can remain in the high normal but are often elevated to very high levels (12,000 - 18,000). Again this is evaluated along with the type of wbc you see and clinical signs. With acute bacterial infections (anywhere in the body), the neutrophils dominate - often with what is called a regenerative left shift - you see "young neutrophils" called bands and the lymphocte count is low while the neutrophis make up 80% or more of the types of wbc seen.

Viral infections = depressed wbc count and changes seen in the lymphocytes (called reactive cells)

On an end note - the presence of wbc in the urine can be secondary to collection method. Males (sorry guys) have a long urethra and a prostate along the route travelled by urine and they can have "debris" at the urethral opening (esp in uncircumcised males). (BTW circumcision does not prevent UTI, cancer ect), the foreskin has a function - but that a whole other thread :huh: )

An infection of the prostate gland can shed wbc into the urine - often (but not always) with other specific cells that would identify the prostate as the source of inflammation/infection. Again this would take into acct - clinical signs/symptoms.

Females - can have the same problem, if the sample is to be a "clean catch" the area needs to be wiped just prior to voiding and then the sample is collected "midstream" - peeing out a bit before collecting.

Periods - just before they start /or after ending (an of course during) can have rbc show up in urine - as a contaminate = no pathology, just a hitchhiker from the nearby anatomical structure :blink:

...that is what makes lab work so fun, it is never as straightforward as it appears.

That is why some can have fever of unknown origin (all labwork normal despite fever)

Inflammation of unknown origin - signs of inflammation in bloodwork (elevated wbc count or elevated sed rate) but no clinical signs or vague clinical signs that make it diffcult to pinpoint the disease..

Medicine is as much a science as an art. The physician who has experience - knows how to evaluate blood work with ease, the newbie is on a learning curve and sees an abnormal result and then orders a bunch of tests - prior to looking at the entire picture to guide them to the next diagnostic test that will be of most value.

Leukocytes : some isolated, non altered

This means the wbc have not degenerated / been used up and altered by being in the urine for a length of time.

Are in the age range for a prostate issue?

Sandy

A good site about crystals in the urine: http://www.agora.crosemont.qc.ca/urinesedi...eng/doc_024.htm

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If it's a kidney infection, you need to stay on top of it as they are quite serious.

If it's a urinary tract infection, you should have had blood in your urine.

I would place my bet on kidney stones, but I'm not doc! I'd go for the testing to rule out kidney infection.

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wow thanks,

Changed my original posts since you reminded me of the translation. cylindre = cast

I had a kidney infection a year or so ago and only just outside normal range wbc but the Dr. (different one) asked me before if I had a urinary infection (well she asked in that special baby language they use like does it hurt when you pee) ...

My last Dr. was very good at diagnosing anything that could be diagnosed in 10 mins :D really that's about it though, my new Dr. who is celaic aware :D is a bit alarmist though. She's an absolute angel but tends to panic for her patients.... (I know quite a few of them and its not just me thinks this and since the med cover is so good in France people don't mind - except I have to pay not being French and not having insurance - well I can sorta claim some back but its a long process and lots of paper work since Im an EU citizen)

Thanks for mentioning the prostate.... Its something I know I have to watch since all my fathers side males have died of prostate cancer and my father is giving it a run for the money ...but Ill make sure I tell my GI...

Howver just to confuse you more - you can have inflammation without infection. Meaning something is causing inflammation but it is not bacterial in origin.

Yes and I'm wondering if its a certain protein we know so well.

On an end note - the presence of wbc in the urine can be secondary to collection method.

Yep but I did erm clean up thouroughly (if you see what I mean) before seeing the Doc... and empty sufficient out before the first test she gave me and I then had to drink 1l of water on my way to get the tests... so i could pee again! again i made sure I expelled some before collection.

Are in the age range for a prostate issue?

38 so a little young but I do have the family history.

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Here is a bit about prostate inflammation that is "benign" and I have included the site whcih discusses the various prostate diseases.

Nonbacterial prostatitis is the most common and least understood form of prostatitis. It is believed to occur eight times more often than bacterial prostatitis. Nonbacterial prostatitis is frequently a chronic, painful condition that is found in men of any age. Symptoms go away and then come back without warning. The urine and fluids from the prostate show no evidence of a known infecting organism, but the semen and other fluids from the prostate contain cells that the body usually produces to fight infection. Doctors often treat nonbacterial prostatitis with antibiotics and drugs that relax the muscles of the prostate gland, but these treatments have not been proven to work and, in fact, often fail. This form of prostatitis can be associated with other diseases, such as reactive arthritis (formerly called Reiter's disease). Sometimes nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen and naproxen, are given to relieve pain.

http://www.medicinenet.com/prostatitis/article.htm

Based on the info you provided, it may be a discussion worth having with your MD

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Funny thing on RBC...

I have a very high tolerance for low oxygen both altitude and snorkelling

and my rbc is always on the high side....

I only just thought, perhaps this is why.

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Yes people and animals like llamas in high altitudes have small rbc with high hgb and increased number of cells... al of whcih improves stamina in high altitude

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CRP is the test that they use to measure inflammatory responses in your body. Given that my joints are typically red, hot & swollen, they always draw that one . . . and it's always fine! Go figure.

With regard the prostate cancer issues in your family: when my father was diagnosed with prostate cancer in 1993, his PSA was 143. Normal is under 7. He had a long talk with my cousin, who was in his late 30's at the time, told him to make sure that he had his PSA checked regularly once he turned 50. My cousin was so scared, that he went to the doctor and insisted on a PSA. Oddly, he DID have prostate cancer. With your family history, I would begin PSA testing VERY early. Just a suggestion.

Am looking up the rest of the values in my books and will get back with you tomorrow . . . .

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CRP is the test that they use to measure inflammatory responses in your body. Given that my joints are typically red, hot & swollen, they always draw that one . . . and it's always fine! Go figure.

With regard the prostate cancer issues in your family: when my father was diagnosed with prostate cancer in 1993, his PSA was 143. Normal is under 7. He had a long talk with my cousin, who was in his late 30's at the time, told him to make sure that he had his PSA checked regularly once he turned 50. My cousin was so scared, that he went to the doctor and insisted on a PSA. Oddly, he DID have prostate cancer. With your family history, I would begin PSA testing VERY early. Just a suggestion.

Am looking up the rest of the values in my books and will get back with you tomorrow . . . .

Many thanks for all that research and knowledge.

I took a fair amoiunt of NSID's (Ibuprofen) and the original pain has really gone.

I have a funny pain tolerance though so when I say something hurts it usually really does.... my girlfriend always tells a story about me spearing my finger with some chrome flake right through the nail to the bone and me saying "ow" and then "no really ow" so usually by the time I say something hurts it really does...

I intend to mention the prostate issue with my GP... I'm sure she will get onto it, she is really proactive to the point where I tell her not to panic and calm down :D but its really just because she feels so much for her patients.

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Yeah the calcium oxalates are indicative of having the chance to develop a kidney stone but equally the elevated Leukocytes in the blood and presence in urine seem to suggest a renal or urinary infection?

Don't know if your SO will buy into this, but when I was in the Peace Corps, one of the volunteers developed kidney stones. The local method of treatment? Lots of sex and beer!

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My urologist said that in order to prevent kidney stones . . . drink water with a wedge of lemon. The citric acid in the lemon prevents the calcium from forming crystals in the kidneys!

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