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Secondary Food Allergies & Intolerances And Confusion

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    • i've researched a little about the genes i have you can find out if they are assosciated with other illnesses/autoimmune diseases. but i don't think knowing the details of every gene is going to help diagnose you any futher than just knowing you have the gene becuse either way it just means you have an increased chance.  if you're iga deficient did you have ttg igg as well?
    • I don't know if there are any grants specifically for gluten-free products Ennis.  But the SBA in USA deals with small business startups and may have information to help you.   There may be small business incubators in your area also.  Sometimes they are associated with university business schools and the SBA.  Marketing a product commercially and labeling it gluten-free is a possible issue though.  There are now FDA rules on labeling products gluten-free.  So you need to study those before getting to far into it.
    • Hi, WinterSong. What a lovely screen name! I don't know if what I have to share will be at all useful to you, but I often get areas of what is known as seborrheic dermatitis on my face and neck. They are common in front of my ears and around the chin - as well as in the folds near the nose and at the base of the neck. These patches are rougher than my normal skin, which is rather light and sensitive. These patches can appear whitish or pinkish in tone. I can get little flaky areas around my brows or even eyelashes that look almost like dandruff also. I seem to get these when I am eating more sugar than usual (i generally eat no to very little sugar) or when I have let up on my water drinking or am experiencing undue stress. The most effective method (for me) to address these patches is a combination of drinking lots of water and washing the areas with (believe it or not) dandruff shampoo; I was told to make a thick application of it and leave it on the areas for one to three minutes before rinsing thoroughly. It usually takes several applications over several days, but so far the protocol has cleared these patches, every time. I am recognizing and treating them sooner now. Your general physician or dermatologist could likely diagnose your trouble and suggest treatment for you, based on the diagnosis. Seborrheic dermatitis is fairly common and doctors may have other specific treatments as well when that is the diagnosis. I use good skincare products (gluten-free!) and find that ensuring that my skin is clean and well-hydrated, morning and evening, also helps avoid or treat flareups, which can be bothersome. I hope this information will be helpful to you in some way, WinterSong. Best to you! Mireille
    • Hi Viviane, No, the antibodies to gliaden are learned by the immune system.  They won't be forgotten by the immune system ever.  The antibodies to gliaden are specific to the protein gliaden that is part of wheat protein.  Once learned, the learning never goes away. Usually the doctor will do an endoscopy to confirm celiac disease damage to the gut lining (villi).  The endoscopy is usually after a positive antibody test, which you had already it sounds like.  You shouldn't stop eating gluten until the endoscopy is completed and test results are received.  If you stop eating gluten too soon, the test results can be faulty. Several people have reported having their gall bladders removed before being diagnosed with celiac disease.  Gallbladder problems and celiac disease seem to go together for some people. Welcome to the forum!
    • It's not fun at first EG1707, but after a variable amount of time you get used to it.  I used to be pretty paranoid about gluten cross contamination, and I am still careful of it, but it isn't a big worrisome thing.  I take precautions and do fine most of the time.  Not being the exact same as everybody else isn't all bad.  Most of your friends can probably shovel all kinds of junk in their gullets and never even think twice about it.  They may have free reign to eat as they please, but they will also have the possibility of eating many more chemical preservatives, flavorings, colorings, and emulsifiers.  Maybe those things aren't automatically bad for them, but they aren't a normal part of a food either.  They are added purely to enhance sales revenue.  Sticking with a mostly whole foods diet you will be able to avoid most of that stuff.  Your liver may thank you for that.  Fewer chemical additives to process isn't such a bad thing. Recovery is not an smooth road sometimes.  The immune reaction is fired up and ready to rumble when we first go gluten-free.  Our guts are also damaged and easily bothered by any kind of minor irritation, that may not cause a problem later on.  Our gut bacterial flora is probably a swamp of unhealthy bacteria that needs to be rehabilitated into a healthy mixture.  None of these things are going to happen over night.  But they can all improve and lead to better health.  And most likely will as time goes by.  But we have to stick it out to give our system time to recover. Additional food intolerances may crop up but they are not insurmountable either.  I struggled with my health for years after going gluten-free, but am so much better now.  I even have some energy now to do things and that is a great thing.  We may not be dealt an easy card, but there are others with much worse situations.  Our disease/condition is one where the treatment is known, the answer is just a diet change, and we don't need strong drugs to combat it.  We have to take care of ourselves, rather than doctors taking care of us.  But that's a good thing. The less gluten, the more whole foods the less processed foods, the better for a beginner IMHO.  There's always time to branch out to more adventerous foods after healing a while.
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