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Epileptic Auras An Ah Ha Moment


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#1 ravenwoodglass

 
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Posted 15 September 2006 - 06:42 AM

When I was frequently haveing seizures before diagnosis I would usually have an aura shortly before the seizures began. Mine were olfactory, I would smell things that weren't there. Sometimes it would be like men's cologne but most of the time it was the smell of baking bread. This started when I really young and haven't had a real bad seizure in years but I was thinking of my Dad last night, he was the baker in the family, and this came to mind. My brain must have been trying to tell me something even from the beginning.

Do any of you that have celiac related seizures ever experience the same type of thing? In retrospect I'm glad I at least hallucinated a pleasent smell.
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Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying
"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)


celiac 49 years - Misdiagnosed for 45
Blood tested and repeatedly negative
Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002
Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis
All bold resoved or went into remission with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002
Some residual nerve damage remains as of 2006- this has continued to resolve after eliminating soy in 2007

Mother died of celiac related cancer at 56
Twin brother died as a result of autoimmune liver destruction at age 15

Children 2 with Ulcers, GERD, Depression, , 1 with DH, 1 with severe growth stunting (male adult 5 feet)both finally diagnosed Celiac through blood testing and 1 with endo 6 months after Mom


Positive to Soy and Casien also Aug 2007

Gluten Sensitivity Gene Test Aug 2007
HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

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#2 imsohungry

 
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Posted 16 September 2006 - 04:19 PM

I'm sorry...wish I could say that I relate. My auras involve distorted vision, sounds, and touch, but not taste or smell (must be a different part of the brain) ;) take care. -Julie
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Loves of my life: God, my hubby, and my baby boy!

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"Life is better left to chance. I could have missed the pain, but I'd have had to miss the dance."
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#3 Guest_nini_*

 
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Posted 16 September 2006 - 04:20 PM

my auras before seizures usually consisted of lights and tastes... would get a metallic taste in my mouth
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#4 Ruth52

 
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Posted 16 September 2006 - 05:10 PM

This is so interesting and maybe gives me an answer. I have never had a seizure that I know of, but I occasionally find that I smell something strange, it is an acrid sort-of burning something smell. I had a cyst removed from my cerebellum eighteen years ago and have been taking anti-seizure medication ever since. The medication wasn't prescribed to stop seizures but to lessen to tremors that had started in my eyes. I tried going off the medication for about eighteen months but the tremors returned.

After reading that this smell thing happens to others I guess it must have something to do with the scarred area of my brain
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#5 jcc

 
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Posted 20 September 2006 - 06:27 AM

My daughter smelled phantom odors frequently during her seizure days. She smelled different lots of different things.

Cara
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#6 Mosaics

 
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Posted 21 September 2006 - 07:59 PM

I haven't ever had a seizure, but I did go through a period of time in which I often smelled bread. I can't really connect it to any incident or time period except that I know it was after my second child was born and lasted for a couple of years. I don't know if it stopped before or after I went on the gluten-free diet.
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#7 lcarter

 
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Posted 30 June 2009 - 05:26 AM

I just recently discovered that my visual auras [DX'd as either Simple Partial Seisures or Migraine w/o Headache] are probably related to the Celiac - I found an article in a Neurology journal recently that made the connection and made me wonder if anyone else out them has had similar experiences in connection with having Celiac. This is the first mention I have seen on a blog. Wow, I never would have guessed that the auras and Celiac are related. None of my doctors ever even mentioned the possibility. But, come to think of it, I have not had an episode since October 2008, and it was only one by itself and very mild. I was having them in clusters of 2-4 about every 3-7 months before that. I started the gluten-free diet about 3 yrs ago. Hummmm!!!!!
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Gluten + Dairy + Fructose Intolerant, Osteoporosis, Hasi's/ Hypothyroid, Sjogren's, Migraine Deviate with Visual Aura, Peripheral Neuropathy, DQ2 and DQ8 negative [Prometheus Labs]

#8 mimommy

 
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Posted 30 June 2009 - 07:16 AM

This post caught my attention when you mentioned 'aura's'. I'm not sure this is what you are talking about, but this link shows a simulation of a migraine aura that is very realistic. I've experienced these for about 20 years. I don't get migraine headaches very often (I've only had a few in my life), but I get the aura's frequently. I can go months w/o one, then have several in a week. They can be disturbing and make things like reading and driving challenging, as they block out a portion of my visual field. I see flashing lights almost constantly, which are sometimes scary (because I can't tell if it is environmental or just mental :rolleyes: ), but mostly it's just annoying. I unfortunately am not one who has found relief from removing gluten from my diet, BUT (I always have to stick my big but in there) , I absolutely believe that gluten is the culprit for many afflictions and illnesses and my daughter has celiac so we all follow a gluten-free diet for her.
Anyway, I have posted this link in the past, but thought it might be of interest here. I went 'undiagnosed' with optic migraine/scintillating scotoma for years and found this last year on the internet. I was shocked to realize that so many people experience this. I'm not sure what impact it has had on my life other than to scare me and make my vision temporarily warble. I don't know if this info is really relevant, but I think it is interesting. And BTW, I get funny smells when I have sinus issues--I ALWAYS smell muffins, and it is strong enough to make me want to gag.

http://www.migraine-...1/index_en.html
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#9 Fiddle-Faddle

 
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Posted 30 June 2009 - 07:51 AM

http://www.migraine-...1/index_en.html

What a great link--thank you SO much for posting it!

I have had only occasional optical migraines (looked like the first video, but the auro itself was in black in white--I didn't get any of those pretty colors!), but recently was diagnosed (questionably) with atypical migraine disorder by the neurologist, who thinks that the ENT's diagnoses of Meniere's might be wrong, and that those symptoms might be an AURAL migraine.

It turned out that many of those symptoms were also caused by B12 deficiency, so that is something to look into as well, especially with a celiac diagnosis. Absorption issues usually cause vitamin deficiencies. In addition, many celiacs have reflux problems (that go away with a gluten-free diet) that are treated with acid blockers--and THAT is one of the most common causes of B12 deficiency, according to the B12 websites. (You NEED the acid to properly absorb the B12.)

B12 is also an important part of MS treatment, as well as prevention of Alzheimer's symptoms (also according to the B12 sites)--so it seems that there are LOTS of neuro implications here. So if you are having frequent migraines, you might want to look into B12 deficiency.

In the US, serum levels are considered normal below 200. In Japan, they consider anything under 550 to be deficient--and they have (by far) the lowest rate of Alzheimer's. There is also at least one study indicating that levels below 500 result in neuro problems--I'll try to find that today and post it.
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#10 maile

 
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Posted 02 July 2009 - 11:47 AM

*waves* me too! me too!

I get the scintillating aura only in the left eye and just occasionally. My MD told me it was an optical migraine and not to worry about it, I had no idea that it was in any way connected to celiac :o

I also get classic migraines, although infrequently, and have an olfactory aura with those....similar to what others have said it I start smelling baking or a brewery smell that's overpowering. One of my colleagues in a previous job wore a perfume that really brought that smell out when I was sliding into migraine time though with her I got a distinct appley smell mixed in with the yeasty smell...I asked her one day if she had been drinking hard cider :rolleyes:
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Enterolab:
Fecal Anti-gliadin IgA 11 Units (Normal Range <10 Units)
Fecal Anti-tissue Transglutaminase IgA 18 Units (Normal Range <10 Units)
Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score <300 Units (Normal Range <300 Units)
Fecal Anti-casein (cow’s milk) IgA 9 Units (Normal Range <10 Units)
Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 1,1 (Subtype 5,5)
(this makes sense, my mother had MS)


What if there were no hypothetical questions?

#11 TiffLuvsBread

 
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Posted 02 July 2009 - 12:52 PM

Do any of you that have celiac related seizures ever experience the same type of thing? In retrospect I'm glad I at least hallucinated a pleasent smell.


Well, this is weird, is there really a connection with this and Celiac!?

I went through a phase, up until a few years ago when it really started to calm down, where I would faint doing anything - standing, kneeling in church, trying on clothes at the mall with my girlfriends, it was horrible. Every time I would faint everyone told me I "shook all over the floor" but doctors never told me I was having seizures - they never used that word anyway.

Before I would lose consciousness, I ALWAYS knew I was going to go down. I knew because of the smell - I told doctors all the time "I have a smell first" but I could never describe the smell. Sometimes they thought I was weird, but one told me that this is not abnormal, as many people smell a smell that they cannot describe but can recognize immediately but as soon as you recognize the smell you're out. I too had the metallic taste in my mouth as another poster said. And tunnel vision. Every time I passed out my body was allegedly stiff as a board. I would just go straight back.

Only a month ago I began a gluten-free diet for all celiac related symptoms but I didn't ever make a possible connection with my fainting and "shaking all over the floor" episodes from beyond the last decade of my life. INTERESTING!!!

So to answer your question, the gluten free diet has DRASTICALLY changed my quality of life, my body, my mind, everything. And it's been less than 30 days. I also have a family history so I am certain gluten has been my poison for quite some time. And also I did have the smell just like you. So hopefully that is the information you were looking for.

Tiffany :)
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Family history of Celiac Disease (father. Sister and paternal aunt also assumed but not diagnosed).
Been fighting the inevitable . . .

St Louis, MO.

#12 lcarter

 
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Posted 07 July 2009 - 09:34 AM

TiffLuvsBread, my gosh, you sound like you are having classic seizures. Have you been to a neurologists? They usually do an MRI and an EEG to check brain waves. Mine showed some slight calcifications and irregular variations in brain waves in the area just behind my right ear. Two different neurologists have dx'd it as either as Simple Partial Seizures or Migraine w/o Headache. One was leaning toward SPS and put me on a seizure med which did help to slow down the frequency or the aura episodes. Then the newer neuro, a few years later, said, "No, I think it is M w/o H", and took me off the medication. That was about 1 1/2 yr ago...I have been gluten-free for 3 1/2 yrs now, and haven't had but 1 mild episode during that time. So, who knows? Here is the article I found:

VISUAL DISTURBANCES REPRESENTING OCCIPITAL LOBE EPILEPSY IN PATIENTS WITH CEREBRAL CALCIFICATIONS AND COELIAC DISEASE: a case series

Journal of Neurology Neurosurgery and Psychiatry 2004;75:1623-1625
© 2004 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd
M Pfaender1, W J D’Souza1, N Trost3, L Litewka2, M Paine4 and M Cook2

Received 29 October 2003
In final revised form 7 January 2004
Accepted 21 January 2004

ABSTRACT
Paroxysmal visual manifestations may represent epileptic seizures arising from the occipital lobe. In coeliac disease (celiac disease) bilateral occipital calcifications and seizure semiology consistent with an occipital origin have been described, primarily in Mediterranean countries. By reporting three adult patients from an Australian outpatient clinic with visual disturbances, occipital cerebral calcifications, and celiac disease, this study seeks to emphasise that celiac disease should be considered even when patients of non-Mediterranean origin present with these symptoms. Seizure types included simple partial, complex–partial, and secondarily generalised seizures. The seizure semiology consisted of visual disturbances such as: blurred vision, loss of focus, seeing coloured dots, and brief stereotyped complex visual hallucinations like seeing unfamiliar faces or scenes. Symptoms of malabsorption were not always present. Neurological examination was unremarkable in two patients, impaired dexterity and mild hemiatrophy on the left was noted in one. Routine electroencephalography was unremarkable. In all cases, computed tomography demonstrated bilateral cortical calcification of the occipital-parietal regions. Magnetic resonance imaging showed no additional lesion. All patients had biopsy confirmed celiac disease. Seizure control improved after treatment with gluten free diet and anticonvulsants. This report illustrates the association between seizures of occipital origin, cerebral calcifications, and celiac disease even in patients not of Mediterranean origin.
________________________________________
Abbreviations: celiac disease, coeliac disease; CT, computed tomography; EEG, electroencephalography; MRI, magnetic resonance imaging
Keywords: cerebral calcification; coeliac disease; occipital lobe epilepsy; visual disturbances
Occipital lobe epilepsy is a relatively rare form of focal epilepsy, with a variety of underlying causes.1,2 Paroxysmal visual manifestations are the hallmark of epileptic seizures arising from the occipital lobe. Such seizure types may also be characteristic of the epilepsy related to coeliac disease (celiac disease).2,3 The existence of a specific syndrome of celiac disease, epileptic seizures, and intracranial calcifications was proposed by Sammaritano and colleagues in 1988,4 and was confirmed in several subsequent series.3,5–8 Nearly all reported cases have been described in young patients of Mediterranean origin, but the prevalence in other ethnic and age groups may be underestimated.9
We report three adult cases from an Australian neurology outpatient clinic to illustrate that the association between occipital lobe epilepsy, bilateral cerebral calcifications, and celiac disease is not restricted to the Mediterranean population.

METHODS
We describe three patients who presented to an Australian neurology outpatient clinic with seizures characterised by visual disturbances. All were of Anglo Celtic ancestry (second or third generation offspring of immigrants from the British Isles). The diagnosis of celiac disease was based on villous atrophy on duodenal biopsy and raised anti-gliadin and/or anti-endomysial IgA and IgG antibodies.

CASE REPORT
Case 1
A 41 year old woman presented with a history of visual disturbances, consisting of blurring of vision and seeing coloured dots. These phenomena were intermittent, lasting from minutes to one hour, and were occasionally accompanied by a headache. The patient felt she was fully aware during these episodes. On occasion, the visual disturbances would be immediately followed by generalised convulsions. The seizures started at age 2 and continued until age 12. Initially treated with phenobarbital, she was seizure free for many years. She also described mild gastrointestinal complaints of recurrent epigastric pain and intermittent diarrhoea. A detailed neurological and ophthalmological examination was unremarkable. Computed tomography (CT) of her brain revealed serpentine calcification of the parietal-occipital regions bilaterally (fig 1 ). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed no additional abnormalities. Routine electroencephalography (EEG) was normal. Blood test screening for celiac disease showed positive anti-endomysial IgA antibodies. The diagnosis of celiac disease was confirmed by partial villous atrophy on small bowel biopsy. The patient was started on valproate and a gluten free diet. Three months later she continued to have seizures, although the overall seizure frequency had improved.



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Figure 1 Computed tomography in case 1 revealing serpentine calcification of the parietal-occipital regions bilaterally.


Case 2
This 43 year old man presented with a history of seizures since age 5. Seizures started with blurred vision, a hot feeling, and a visual hallucination, which consisted of a complex scene. He had the sensation that his eyes and head would flick to the right, accompanied by repetitive movements of one hand or foot. His father confirmed that awareness was briefly lost during these episodes. Headache was a prominent feature of the post-ictal phase. Neurological examination revealed mild left hemiatrophy, with reduced hand size and impaired dexterity on that side. CT scan and MRI of the brain showed serpentine calcification involving occipital-parietal regions bilaterally, particularly on the right. EEG was normal. Numerous anticonvulsants were tried without much effect. By the age of 20, the seizures had largely abated. About five years ago the patient was diagnosed with celiac disease on clinical, biochemical, and histological findings and was started on a gluten free diet. Currently treated with lamotrigine and a gluten free diet he has approximately one simple–partial seizure each month.
Case 3
This 57 year old woman with known celiac disease since childhood complained of episodes of visual disturbances. celiac disease was diagnosed on the basis of raised anti-gliadin antibodies and villous atrophy on duodenal biopsy, but only recently had she modified her diet. She currently denies the presence of symptoms related to her celiac disease apart from the inability to gain weight. The visual disturbances started at the age of 23 and consisted of loss of focus, obscured vision for a few seconds, followed by visual hallucinations, which consisted of seeing unfamiliar people. Sleep deprivation appeared to trigger these episodes. She also had several generalised tonic clonic seizures from sleep. Neurological examination was unremarkable. CT scan showed occipital calcifications bilaterally. EEG was normal. She was on phenytoin for many years but stopped the medication after being free of the major seizures for some time. However, when anticonvulsants were ceased the visual disturbances became more frequent. She was started on valproate and continued with her gluten free diet. Since then, the visual disturbances have greatly decreased.

DISCUSSION
An association between epilepsy and celiac disease has been recognised since the 1960s, when Cooke and Smith described "unexplained attacks of unconsciousness" in five patients with celiac disease.10 Since then, a higher prevalence of epilepsy among patients with CD11 and an increased frequency of celiac disease in epileptic patients has been found.12,13 "Episodes of blindness" were reported by Banerji and Hurwitz14 in a study of neurological manifestations in adults with celiac disease. Subsequently, others have proposed that paroxysmal visual manifestation and ictal EEG discharges arising from the occipital lobe may be characteristic of the epilepsy related to celiac disease.3,6 Our patients developed seizures in their early childhood and adolescence manifested by visual symptoms and elementary and complex visual hallucinations. The correlation of elementary hallucinations, such as coloured dots or blobs described by one patient, and ictal blurred vision reported by all patients with occipital seizure onset, has been described.1,15 Although ictal EEG recordings were not made, the visual disturbances closely preceded loss of awareness or convulsions, and appear to be the initiating symptom of seizure propagation, providing strong supporting evidence that the seizures were arising from the occipital lobes.
All our patients had bilateral occipital calcifications, epilepsy, and biopsy confirmed celiac disease, similar to those described in the young Mediterranean population series.3,4,6–8,16,17 The calcifications seen in these cases are typically bilateral, corticosubcortical, and flocculonodular, without cerebral atrophy. The calcifications resemble those found in Sturge-Weber syndrome and in the past have led to a diagnosis of Sturge-Weber syndrome without naevus flammeus.17–19 Some of these reported cases might be undiagnosed cases of celiac disease. A high prevalence of celiac disease was found in patients with epilepsy and bilateral occipital calcifications. In two Italian studies of epilepsy and cerebral calcifications of unknown origin, eight of 16 and 24 of 31 patients had biopsy confirmed celiac disease.5,7,16 In contrast, the prevalence of bilateral occipital calcifications in patients with epilepsy and celiac disease is relatively low, ranging between none of 16 and five of 12 in an Irish and Italian study, respectively.5,12 Our case series, encountered outside the Mediterranean population, further emphasises this interesting syndromic association, and suggests that it may not be an ethnically or geographically restricted finding.
A genetic predisposition has been suggested to play a role in the pathogenesis.12,20 Nearly all patients with celiac disease carry the HLA-DQ2 (95%) or HLA-DQ8 (5%) haplotypes.19 Data from Mantovani indicate that the HLA genotype and phenotype predisposing to celiac disease are the same as those predisposing to epilepsy and bilateral occipital calcifications.20 It is conceivable that in individuals with the same immunogenetic background, additional genetic and environmental factors are specifically related to the onset of celiac disease induced dysfunction of the occipital lobe. It has been proposed that calcifications might be related to reduced central nervous folate concentrations, secondary to malabsorption and impairment of folic acid transport across the blood–brain barrier.5,18,21 However, the actual pathophysiology has not yet been determined. In addition, folic acid deficiency is not always demonstrable in subjects affected by epilepsy, cerebral calcifications, and celiac disease.5,6 The lack of a high prevalence of bilateral occipital calcifications in patients with celiac disease, even in those with a long exposure to gluten, also seems to be contrary to the hypothesis of a nutritional deficiency as a cause of the calcifications. Another possibility is that the cerebral calcifications are caused by an autoimmune or immune complex related endothelial inflammation.5,6,9 Further studies need to be undertaken to clarify the pathophysiology of occipital calcifications and epileptogenicity of the surrounding cortex.
The epilepsy associated with bilateral occipital calcification can be difficult to treat.2 Some of these patients develop drug resistant seizures.16 There is no correlation between the severity of epilepsy and the age of seizure onset or extent of cerebral calcifications.7 As noted in our patients, seizure control was improved in some cases after the institution of a gluten free diet with folic acid supplements5,6,8; however, others reported no effect.3 The success of the diet in improving seizure control appears to be potentiated by its institution soon after the onset of the epilepsy and at an early age.5,6,8
Of note, our patients had none or only mild gastrointestinal symptoms. Often celiac disease is asymptomatic and detected only by serological screening.5,7 Screening for anti-endomysial or anti-tissue transglutaminase IgA antibodies is currently the method of choice for suspected occult celiac disease.22,23 Although small bowel biopsy is the diagnostic gold standard, and confirmed the diagnosis in our three patients, these serological markers can be useful in helping to select patients for invasive diagnosis.
In summary, we described three adult patients with visual disturbances, bilateral occipital-parietal calcifications, and celiac disease, who presented to an Australian neurology outpatient clinic, illustrating this described association outside the typical young Mediterranean population. Visual symptoms representing occipital lobe epilepsy and cerebral calcifications may be the first clue to the presence of otherwise asymptomatic celiac disease. We conclude that patients with epilepsy who have seizures suggestive of occipital semiology and cerebral calcifications of unexplained aetiology should be carefully investigated for celiac disease, even in the absence of gastrointestinal symptoms.

FOOTNOTES
Competing interest: none declared

REFERENCES
1. Williamson PD, Thadani VM, Darcey TM, et al. Occipital lobe epilepsy: clinical characteristics, seizure spread patterns, and results of surgery. Ann Neurol 1992;31:3–13.[CrossRef][Medline]
2. Taylor I , Scheffer IE, Berkovic SF. Occipital epilepsies: identification of specific and newly recognized syndromes. Brain 2003;126:753–69.[Abstract/Free Full Text]
3. Ambrosetto G , Antonini L, Tassinari CA. Occipital lobe seizures related to clinically asymptomatic celiac disease in adulthood. Epilepsia 1992;33:476–81.[CrossRef][Medline]
4. Sammaritano M , Andermann F, Melanson D. The syndrome of intractable epilepsy, bilateral occipital calcifications and folic acid deficiency. Neurology 1988;38:239.[Abstract/Free Full Text]
5. Gobbi G , Bouquet F, Greco L, et al. Coeliac disease, epilepsy, and cerebral calcifications. The Italian Working Group on Coeliac Disease and Epilepsy. Lancet 1992;340:439–43.[CrossRef][Medline]
6. Labate A , Gambardella A, Messina D, et al. Silent celiac disease in patients with childhood localization-related epilepsies. Epilepsia 2001;42:1153–5.[CrossRef][Medline]
7. Magaudda A , Dalla Bernardina B, De Marco P, et al. Bilateral occipital calcification, epilepsy and coeliac disease: clinical and neuroimaging features of a new syndrome. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 1993;56:885–9.[Abstract]
8. Hernandez MA, Colina G, Ortigosa L. Epilepsy, cerebral calcifications and clinical or subclinical coeliac disease. Course and follow up with gluten-free diet. Seizure 1998;7:49–54.[CrossRef][Medline]
9. Dickey W . Epilepsy, cerebral calcifications, and coeliac disease. Lancet 1994;344:1585–6.[Medline]
10. Cooke WT, Smith WT. Neurological disorders associated with adult coeliac disease. Brain 1966;89:683–722.[Free Full Text]
11. Chapman RW, Laidlow JM, Colin-Jones D, et al. Increased prevalence of epilepsy in coeliac disease. BMJ 1978;2:250–1.[Medline]
12. Cronin CC, Jackson LM, Feighery C, et al. Coeliac disease and epilepsy. Q J Med 1998;91:303–8.
13. Fois A , Vascotto M, Di Bartolo RM, et al. Celiac disease and epilepsy in pediatric patients. Childs Nerv Syst 1994;10:450–4.[CrossRef][Medline]
14. Banerji NK, Hurwitz LJ. Neurological manifestations in adult steatorrhoea (probable gluten enteropathy). J Neurol Sci 1971;14:125–41.[CrossRef][Medline]
15. Bien CG, Benninger FO, Urbach H, et al. Localizing value of epileptic visual auras. Brain 2000;123:244–53.[Abstract/Free Full Text]
16. Gobbi G , Sorrenti G, Santucci M, et al. Epilepsy with bilateral occipital calcifications: a benign onset with progressive severity. Neurology 1988;38:913–20.[Abstract/Free Full Text]
17. Tiacci C , D’Alessandro P, Cantisani TA, et al. Epilepsy with bilateral occipital calcifications: Sturge-Weber variant or a different encephalopathy? Epilepsia 1993;34:528–39.[CrossRef][Medline]
18. Garwicz S , Mortensson W. Intracranial calcification mimicking the Sturge-Weber syndrome: a consequence of cerebral folic acid deficiency? Pediatr Radiol 1976;5:5–9.[CrossRef][Medline]
19. Greco L , Corazza G, Babron MC, et al. Genome search in celiac disease. Am J Hum Genet 1998;62:669–75.[CrossRef][Medline]
20. Mantovani W . HLA in coeliac disease and epilepsy. In: Gobbi G, Andermann F, Naccarato S, et al, eds. Epilepsy and other neurological disorders in coeliac disease. London: John Libbey & Company Ltd, 1997:143–6.
21. Calvani M , Parisi P, Guaitolini C, et al. Latent coeliac disease in a child with epilepsy, cerebral calcifications, drug-induced systemic lupus erythematosus and intestinal folic acid malabsorption associated with impairment of folic acid transport across the blood–brain barrier. Eur J Pediatr 2001;160:288–92.[CrossRef][Medline]
22. Wills AJ, Unsworth DJ. The neurology of gluten sensitivity: separating the wheat from the chaff. Curr Opin Neurol 2002;15:519–23.[CrossRef][Medline]
23. Farrell RJ, Kelly CP. Celiac sprue. N Engl J Med 2002;346:180–8.[Free Full Text]
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Gluten + Dairy + Fructose Intolerant, Osteoporosis, Hasi's/ Hypothyroid, Sjogren's, Migraine Deviate with Visual Aura, Peripheral Neuropathy, DQ2 and DQ8 negative [Prometheus Labs]

#13 ravenwoodglass

 
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Posted 07 July 2009 - 10:19 AM

Thanks for posting this. Maybe someday US neuros will get more knowledge about the corelationship of celiac and the calcifications. Mine unfortunately was clueless and jsut shrugged his shoulders and told us the 'unidentified bright objects' were meaningless. I would suggest that anyone who suspects celiac and suffers from a seizure disorder print out this information and bring it with them to their neurologist.
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Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying
"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)


celiac 49 years - Misdiagnosed for 45
Blood tested and repeatedly negative
Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002
Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis
All bold resoved or went into remission with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002
Some residual nerve damage remains as of 2006- this has continued to resolve after eliminating soy in 2007

Mother died of celiac related cancer at 56
Twin brother died as a result of autoimmune liver destruction at age 15

Children 2 with Ulcers, GERD, Depression, , 1 with DH, 1 with severe growth stunting (male adult 5 feet)both finally diagnosed Celiac through blood testing and 1 with endo 6 months after Mom


Positive to Soy and Casien also Aug 2007

Gluten Sensitivity Gene Test Aug 2007
HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)




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