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Where To Buy 'green' Household Items


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#1 floridanative

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Posted 19 September 2006 - 01:08 PM

I am highly sensitive to fragrances, so much so that if you bathe in your perfume and sit anywhere near me in a movie theatre, I have to get up and move to another seat. Wee use Snuggle fabric sheets but now the new and improved ones are so strong that I have to return them as walking by the laundry room makes me nauseous and the box is not even open. Where do you find/purchase earth friendly househould goods - assuming some of you do? I know someone out there must offer a non scented (or more natural scented) dryer sheet. There were 12 different scents at Target and I got the least offending one which still isn't acceptable.
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Positive blood tests - Sept. 2005
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#2 CarlaB

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Posted 19 September 2006 - 01:12 PM

I stopped using dryer sheets for that very reason.

I think Simple Green is natural. The community center here uses it to clean the fitness equipment. I checked it out because of that, and it is gluten-free. It's like Windex and I think the grocery store carries it. I was wondering myself how well it worked ... might switch to it from Windex if it works well!
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#3 chrissy

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Posted 19 September 2006 - 01:14 PM

i am the same way with smells!!!!! i have been this way ever since i was pregnant with my 11 year old. i am not bothered too much by fruity smells, but anything perfumy makes me sick----not nauseated, but sick. once i used some "unscented" hair spray that had too much of a smell. it was really bothering me, so i washed my hair, but it must have gotten on me somewhere else because i didn't feel better until i took a shower.

i have heard that vinegar will work in place of a fabric softener---but i can't remember how to use it for that purpose----i'll see if i can find the info for you.
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Christine

15 year old twins with celiac, diagnosed dec. 2005
11 year old daughter with celiac diagnosed dec 2005
17 year old son with celiac gene

#4 Guest_~jules~_*

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Posted 19 September 2006 - 01:18 PM

I stopped using dryer sheets for that very reason.

I think Simple Green is natural. The community center here uses it to clean the fitness equipment. I checked it out because of that, and it is gluten-free. It's like Windex and I think the grocery store carries it. I was wondering myself how well it worked ... might switch to it from Windex if it works well!

Your right carla, simple green is natural and bio degradable, its sort of an all purpose cleaner thats best known as a degreaser. The smell is nasty though its sort of a minty smell, costco has their own version of it under their kirkland brand, it smells much lighter, its less expensive, and works just as good. Sheesh can you tell this is my trade? lol...
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#5 abc

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Posted 19 September 2006 - 01:19 PM

I tend to be a little overly sensitive, not to the fragrance themselves, but to the fact that I know those fragrances are poisonous!
Dryer sheets are an "issue" in our house, b/c my husband loves them, and I think it just emits a film that then is stuck on the clothes/sheets/towels so you wear (sleep in, dry in) poison. But, we have compromised. I found Meyer's dryer sheets at whole foods, and they are supposedly natural. The ones I buy are lavender scented, and can be potent out of the box, but when put with the clothes in the dryer are rather faint in smell.

I do a lot of cleaning with natural products - Meyer's all purpose is a favorite. I also use just plain old baking soda to scrub pots and pans and like white vinegar (watered down) to clean countertops and the like. The vinegar is stinky at first - but quickly fades.
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#6 Michi8

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Posted 19 September 2006 - 01:28 PM

I am highly sensitive to fragrances, so much so that if you bathe in your perfume and sit anywhere near me in a movie theatre, I have to get up and move to another seat. Wee use Snuggle fabric sheets but now the new and improved ones are so strong that I have to return them as walking by the laundry room makes me nauseous and the box is not even open. Where do you find/purchase earth friendly househould goods - assuming some of you do? I know someone out there must offer a non scented (or more natural scented) dryer sheet. There were 12 different scents at Target and I got the least offending one which still isn't acceptable.


I'm super sensitive to scents too. Just passing by a candle or aromatherapy store gives me a migraine. And it's the worst when you have to put up with smelling someone who overdoes it with scent.

The best earth friendly cleaning products are really the basics. Borax, baking soda, vinegar, ammonia, lemon juice, etc.

For laundry, I find even the unscented dryer sheets are hard on my skin. I don't bother with dryer sheets...they really aren't necessary. Vinegar in the rinse cycle is a very good substitute for the sheets (helps take out any detergent residue too.)

Michelle
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#7 floridanative

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Posted 19 September 2006 - 01:31 PM

Oh thanks for all the tips and I'm glad I'm not the only person with such an aversion to this stuff. I forgot about Simple Green and I think I saw it somewhere around town. I'm going to my new Whole Foods tomorrow on opening day and I'm going to see what they offer for natural cleaning items and look for the Meyer's dryer sheets.

I'm with you abc on the whole poison thing. In my book about premenopause (not peri) the doc that wrote it notes that will all the toxic things we use in every day life, it is no wonder so many of our population is getting cancers of all kinds. He doesn't even like plastic toys for kids........I don't have kids but my neices and nephews have nothing but plastic stuff. He also suggest women use non toxic nail polish which is my change after dryer sheets. I have some info on healthy nail polish somewhere around here.
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Dx'd with anemia - March 2005
Positive blood tests - Sept. 2005
Positive biopsy - Jan. 2006
Gluten free since 1-23-06

#8 debmidge

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Posted 19 September 2006 - 01:33 PM

I use vinegar to clean up most everything and if that doesn't work then I use the baking soda - last resort is Clorox or ammonia. Even some detergents are too fragranced. Between that & the dryer sheets I have sometimes re-washed clothes by hand and air dryed them just to get the smell of the detergent/dryer sheet out.
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Husband has Celiac Disease and
Husband misdiagnosed for 27 yrs -
The misdiagnosis was: IBS or colitis
Mis-diagnosed from 1977 to 2003 by various gastros including one of the largest,
most prestigious medical groups in northern NJ which constantly advertises themselves as
being the "best." This GI told him it was "all in his head."
Serious Depressive state ensued
Finally Diagnosed with celiac disease in 2003
Other food sensitivities: almost all fruits, vegetables, spices, eggs, nuts, yeast, fried foods, roughage, soy.
Needs to gain back at least 25 lbs. of the 40 lbs pounds he lost - lost a great amout of body fat and muscle
Developed neuropathy in 2005
Now has lymphadema 2006
It is my opinion that his subsequent disorders could have been avoided had he been diagnosed sooner by any of the dozen or so doctors he saw between 1977 to 2003

#9 floridanative

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Posted 19 September 2006 - 01:38 PM

Okay I went to the simple green website and called the 800#. Some of their products are in Atlanta Home Depots and Lowe's stores. They do not make dryer sheets. They seem to have a fairly large line of stuff so I'll post back what I try and how it works. I know once I saw on Today or some morning show that Windex has so many toxic chemicals in it that young children should not be exposed to it. I think it was that campaign that Kelly something (Travolta's wife) did a few years back after their son almost died after breathing in the fumes from their carpets being cleaned.
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Dx'd with anemia - March 2005
Positive blood tests - Sept. 2005
Positive biopsy - Jan. 2006
Gluten free since 1-23-06

#10 CarlaB

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Posted 19 September 2006 - 01:44 PM

Okay I went to the simple green website and called the 800#. Some of their products are in Atlanta Home Depots and Lowe's stores. They do not make dryer sheets. They seem to have a fairly large line of stuff so I'll post back what I try and how it works. I know once I saw on Today or some morning show that Windex has so many toxic chemicals in it that young children should not be exposed to it. I think it was that campaign that Kelly something (Travolta's wife) did a few years back after their son almost died after breathing in the fumes from their carpets being cleaned.

My husband met someone one time whose child had died from drinking Windex.

Was the book you read What Your Doctor May Not Tell You About Premenopause? If so, I just read another book by Jesse Lynn Hanely M.D. (the woman who collaborated on that book) called Tired of Being Tired. It's very good, too.
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gluten-free 12/05

diagnosed with Lyme Disease 12/06

#11 jerseyangel

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Posted 19 September 2006 - 01:52 PM

Hi Tiffany :)

I also stay away from scented things. Just walking down the cleaning isles at the grocery store can turn my stomach!

For laundry, I use Purex Free and Clear or All Free and Clear.

All makes drier sheets that are free of perfumes.

I like the idea of the more natural products from the specialty stores, but I tend to do a lot of laundry, and those products are more expensive. Just thought I'd mention some things available at regular stores.
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Patti


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"Bloom where you are planted"--Bev

#12 floridanative

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Posted 19 September 2006 - 01:59 PM

Carla - yes that's the book. After going off the pill it saved my life. I use all natural remedies and so far, so good. Mother took hormones for year and still suffered for over 15 years with hot flashes and night sweats starting around 40. My pcp agrees with the books suggestions so I was glad she didn't tell me it was bunk or esle I'd have to find yet another new doctor - lol! Thanks for telling me about the other book, I'm going to get it too for Mother as we think she has Hashimoto's in addition to celiac disease so she's going to be tested for that now.

Patti - thanks for telling me about the All sheets. I'm not sure I think we need the sheets anymore but DH is sort of addicted to them and he does the laundry. I do fine with Tide Free but it's the only detergent I've been able to tolerate for years. Anything else makes me sick to my stomach.
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Dx'd with anemia - March 2005
Positive blood tests - Sept. 2005
Positive biopsy - Jan. 2006
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#13 2Boys4Me

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Posted 19 September 2006 - 02:01 PM

I call the soap/laundry/detergent aisle the "stinky" aisle. I refer to perfume as "smelly".

I've tried some of these recipes below, and they work well. The vinegar ones are stinky but in a rather inoffensive way. (Sorry for the length of this post.)

http://www.organizedhome.com

white vinegar
Mildly acidic white vinegar dissolves dirt, soap scum, and hard water deposits from smooth surfaces, yet is gentle enough to use in solution to clean hardwood flooring. White vinegar is a natural deodorizer, absorbing odors instead of covering them up. (And no, your bathroom won't smell like a salad! Any vinegar aroma disappears when dry.) With no coloring agents, white vinegar won't stain grout on tiled surfaces. Because it cuts detergent residue, white vinegar makes a great fabric softener substitute for families with sensitive skin.

Try these recipes to harness the cleaning power of white vinegar:

Homemade Spray Cleaner Recipe
Mix in a sprayer bottle:
1 cup white vinegar
1 cup water

In the kitchen, use vinegar-and-water spray to clean countertops, lightly soiled range surfaces and backsplash areas.

In the bathroom, use vinegar spray cleaner to clean countertops, floors, and exterior surfaces of the toilet.

For really tough bathroom surfaces such as shower walls, pump up the cleaning power by removing the sprayer element and heating the solution in the microwave until barely hot. Spray shower walls with the warmed generously, allow to stand for 10 to 15 minutes, then scrub and rinse. The heat helps soften stubborn soap scum and loosens hard water deposits.


undiluted white vinegar
Undiluted white vinegar straight from the jug makes quick work of tougher cleaning problems involving hard water deposits or soap scum.

Use undiluted white vinegar to scrub the inside of the toilet bowl. Before you begin, dump a bucket of water into the toilet to force water out of the bowl and allow access to the sides. Pour undiluted white vinegar around the bowl and scrub with a toilet brush to remove stains and odor. Use a pumice stone to remove any remaining hard water rings.

Clean shower heads that have been clogged with mineral deposits with undiluted white vinegar. Place 1/4 to 1/2 cup vinegar in a plastic food storage bag, and secure the bag to the shower head with a rubber band. Let stand for 2 hours to overnight, then rinse and buff the fixture to a shiny finish.

Add one cup of undiluted white vinegar to the laundry rinse cycle instead of commercial fabric softener. White vinegar softens clothes and cuts detergent residue--a plus for family members with sensitive skin.

baking soda
Baking soda's mild abrasive action and natural deodorizing properties make it a powerful replacement for harsh commercial scouring powders. Put baking soda to work in your organized home:

Sprinkle baking soda onto a damp sponge to tackle grimy bathtub rings, scour vanities, or remove food deposits from the kitchen sink. For tougher grime, make a paste of baking soda and water, apply to the tub or sink, and allow to stand for 10 to 20 minutes. Dirt, soap scum and deposits soften and are easier to remove.

Slow-running drains? Keep bathroom drains running freely by pouring 1/2 to 3/4 cup baking soda into the drain, and dribbling just enough hot water to wash the solution down. Let stand for 2 hours to overnight, then flush thoroughly with hot water. The deodorizing effect is an added bonus! [Do not use this method on blocked drains.]

rubbing alcohol
Rubbing (isopropyl) alcohol provides the base for an evaporating cleaner to rival commercial window and glass cleaning solutions. Use this glass cleaning spray recipe for windows, mirrors, chrome fixtures and for a shiny finish on hard-surface ceramic tiles:

Homemade Glass Cleaner Recipe
Mix in a sprayer bottle:

1 cup rubbing (isopropyl) alcohol
1 cup water
1 tablespoon white vinegar

ammonia

A strong alkaline solution, clear, non-sudsing ammonia creates stronger window and all-purpose cleaning recipes than acidic vinegar.

Choose non-sudsing varieties of household ammonia for these cleaning recipes. Suds may look like they're working, but they're tough to rinse and remove.

Try these formulations for spring cleaning or tough chores:

Strong Glass Cleaner Recipe
Mix in a sprayer bottle:

1 cup rubbing (isopropyl) alcohol
1 cup water
1 tablespoon clear, non-sudsing ammonia

Strong All-Purpose Recipe
Mix in a sprayer bottle:

1 T clear, non-sudsing ammonia
1 T clear laundry detergent
2 cups water

furniture polish

Most of us no longer use hard-to-apply furniture wax, but rely on oil-based polish to keep furniture protected and shiny.

Our "salad dressing" version avoids the danger of silicone oil, found in most commercial polishes and sprays. Silicone oil can penetrate tiny cracks in furniture finish and enter the wood, causing problems in the event refinishing is needed. Lemon juice dissolves dirt and smudges, while olive oil shines and protects the wood:

Furniture Polish Recipe
Mix in a sprayer bottle:

1 cup olive oil
1/2 cup lemon juice

Shake well and apply a small amount to a flannel cleaning rag or cleaning cloth. Spread evenly over furniture surface. Turn cloth to a dry side and polish dry.


Homemade cleaning wipes:

materials and equipment needed:

cylindrical plastic food storage container, 10-cup capacity
extra-large roll of paper towels
cleaning agents of your choice (recipes follow)

electric drill with 1/2-inch drill bit
electric knife
liquid measuring cups

instructions:

In the garage or workshop area, place a small block of wood beneath the plastic food storage container lid. Use electric drill to drill a 1/2-inch diameter hole in the center of the container lid.

For best results, select an extra-large roll of good quality paper towels for this project. Less-expensive towels fray or shred when pulled through the holder; thicker quilted towels have greater cleaning strength and withstand more scrubbing. Even at $1.39 per roll, cost for homemade wipes will be less than 75 cents, not including the storage container.

Without removing the paper towel wrapper, use the electric knife to cut the paper towel roll into two shorter rolls. Save the second roll for a refill later. Be patient! It may take up to two minutes to cut through the towel roll and cardboard tube inside.

Remove the wrapper, and place one short paper towel roll inside plastic food storage container. Using a liquid measuring cup, gently pour one of the following cleaning solution recipes over the top of the paper towel roll.

You will need between 2 and 4 cups of cleaning solution, depending on the size and absorbency of the paper towel product selected. These recipes make about three cups of solution; increase or decrease amounts if needed.

General Surface Cleaning:
1 1/2 cups white vinegar
1 1/2 cups water

Disinfectant Cleaning:
1/4 to 1/2 cup pine cleaning solution such as Pine-Sol brand
2 1/2 to 2 3/4 cup water

Window and Glass Cleaning:
1/2 cup rubbing (isopropyl) alcohol
2 1/2 cups water
1 tablespoon white vinegar

Place the lid on the plastic food storage container, and allow paper towels to absorb cleaning solution for 4 hours to overnight.

Open the food storage container. Gently pull the wet cardboard tube from the center of the paper towel roll and discard. Carefully pull the end of the paper towels from the inside, where the cardboard roll had been. Thread the end of the towels through the hole in the lid, and replace the lid.

Pull gently on the exposed end to separate the cleaning wipe.

tips:

As you use the wipes, they will begin to dry out, so add more water and/or cleaning solution as necessary. Allow wipes to stand overnight before continuing to use them after adding more solution.

You may vary the strength of the cleaning solutions as necessary for your household, using more cleaning agents for a stronger wipe, less solution and more water for a milder product.
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Linda, Mom to Ty (11 years old)
Ty was diagnosed by blood test June 7/05
biopsy Aug 11/05, diagnosis confirmed Aug 18/05
Mom, Dad and big brother Celiac-free.

#14 Ursa Major

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Posted 19 September 2006 - 02:01 PM

I only use Lame Advertisement products for all my cleaning supplies (laundry, dishes, floors, bathtub, first-aid supplies, etc.). They are all natural, and the laundry detergent and fabric softener (dryer sheets or liquid) come in scented and unscented.

They are all non-toxic, even if a child would drink their dishwasher detergent, it wouldn't harm the kid. If a child even sticks a finger into the other stuff and licks it, it might kill the child!

I used to get terribly itchy all over, and have been fine since using their stuff. I still get sick from their cleaners, because they emit salicylates, but not like with the chemical cleaners, which made me sick to my stomach and gave me a migraine.

Check out their site: www.Lame Advertisement.com
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I am a German citizen, married to a Canadian 29 years, four daughters, one son, seven granddaughters and four grandsons, with one more grandchild on the way in July 2009.

Intolerant to all lectins (including gluten), nightshades (potatoes, tomatoes, peppers, eggplant) and salicylates.

Asperger Syndrome, Tourette Syndrome, Addison's disease (adrenal insufficiency), hypothyroidism, fatigue syndrome, asthma

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#15 floridanative

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Posted 19 September 2006 - 03:14 PM

Oh that looks like a good line too Ursula - thanks! I have never heard of that line of products. Like always, this is the best place to come for help with any given situation! Have a good night everyone. Gotta run check out a recliner a neighbor is giving away. DH can't imagine taking someone else's used furniture but it's for the workout/music room which no one ever sees and I'll get a new cover for it.
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Dx'd with anemia - March 2005
Positive blood tests - Sept. 2005
Positive biopsy - Jan. 2006
Gluten free since 1-23-06


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