Enterolab Results In !

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I just got my results back and am wondering what you all think. I did go gluten-free for about 2 weeks and felt better but when I decided to test I ate some gluten to make sure to get the most accurate results...

Gluten sensitivity stool test

Fecal Antigliadin IgA 16 units (normal range<10 units)

Stool test for autoimmune reation to tissue trasglutaminase

Fecal Antitissure Transglutaminase IgA 13 units (normal range<10 units)

Stool test for small intestinal Malabsorption

Microscopic fecal fat score 166 units (normal range<300 units)

I am 34 years old and have had intestinal symptoms dating back to childhood. I was diognosed with IBD 10 years ago.


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Looks like you're gluten intolerant (both tests for that came back positive), but haven't yet had enough damage to the intestines that you are having malabsorption problems.

If going gluten-free made you feel better, that is yet one more positive test result to throw in the mix. I'd stay gluten-free, were it me.


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I also did the Enterolab tests, but AFTER I had been avoiding gluten for 2 months and lactose for over 10 years. I had gluten slips during that time, but also continued to consume casein. My test results were similar. I hope you read Dr. Fine's interpretation of your results included in the report E-lab sent to you. He usually explains what lower positive numbers indicate, i.e., no matter how low, positive is still positive. So your symptoms have been caused by gluten intolerance which produced antibodies in an autoimmune reaction. Did you also have the gene test or the milk sensitivity test? I ordered the whole package of test and was SOOOOO glad to get those milk sensitivity results. :D Not that I wanted the extra burden of avoiding casein as well as gluten, but I STILL had symptoms despite my best effforts to avoid gluten.

I had been taking probiotics and digestive enzymes over a year before I did the 'malabsorption' test. I was told that could have skewed my results, but I didn't know when I did the tests. You can read others' results under the Enterolabs topic, but here's mine for comparison (plus the interpretation):

Gluten Sensitivity Stool Test

Fecal Antigliadin IgA 14 Units (Normal Range <10 Units*)

Stool Test for Autoimmune Reaction to Tissue Transglutaminase

Fecal Antitissue Transglutaminase IgA 17 Units (Normal Range <10 Units)

Stool Test for Small Intestinal Malabsorption

Microscopic Fecal Fat Score: 132 Units (Normal Range < 300 Units)

Stool Test for Milk Sensitivity

Fecal anti-casein IgA antibody 12 Units (Normal Range <10 Units)

Gene Test for Gluten Sensitivity

Molecular Analysis: HLA-DQB1*0602, 0302

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 1,3 (subtype 6,8)

Interpretation: Analysis of this stool sample indicates you have dietary gluten sensitivity, resulting in an associated autoimmune reaction to the human enzyme tissue transglutaminase, but no small intestinal malabsorption/damage. You also have antibodies to the main cow's milk protein, casein, and hence, you are immunologically sensitive to foods containing cow's milk.

HLA gene analysis reveals that you have a copy of one of the main genes that predisposes to gluten sensitivity and celiac sprue, HLA-DQ3, subtype 8 (HLA-DQ8). This genotype also can predispose to microscopic colitis and other autoimmune syndromes.

I've had celiac disease symptoms for 50 years and was given the 'IBS' MIS diagnosis 10 years ago. I hope that helps you understand your results better. :) Also write to Dr. Fine, if you have any questions. He will promptly answer your emails/questions.



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So the fact that you are just gluten intolerant will show up on the test? Does that mean you are not Celiac if you have no intestinal damage?????? :huh:


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A positive gluten sensitivity test and/or a positive autoimmune reaction to tissue transglutaminase means you have celiac disease. My tests also indicated I have a copy of the main celiac gene, so I definitely have celiac disease, whether or not my intestines have been damaged enough to indicate malabsorption problems. However, I was also told that taking digestive enzymes can 'mask pancreatic insufficiency' which causes excess fecal fat which indicates malabsorption damage. So just having gluten antibodies and/or positve tissue transglutaminase reaction says celiac disease no matter what the malabsorption test says. Enterolab results always include an interpretation which tells you all that. :)



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