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Your Kidding
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12 posts in this topic

im seiously not a happy bunny :angry::lol: had` some allergy testing and she said i have a major problem with white wine ( mind me while i swear a lot ) **** gutted isnt the word. it white is off the list would red be ok? im no alko but i love a glass of wine at night especailly after doing a workout at night as it helps me off to sleep and relax.

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Well, you have various approaches to this....

Does white wine bother you when you drink it? The reason that I am asking is that I have heard that there is a high percentage of false positives with allergy testing.

That being said, if you don't react, it would be up to you as to how you want to deal with it.

Was red wine tested? If you tested negative on that, and react to white wine, than maybe red wine would be safe. If it wasn't, I would do some google searches about white wine allergies and see what you come up with...maybe they have the answer about red wines.

What about things like zinfindels

Also, is it the sulfites that is the problem? Or the grapes? Or what? That might help in your thought process.

I unfortunately don't have any real answers, but I understand your pain! I am no longer drinking right now because I am reacting to everything under the sun. If I were you, and got the test results back, that would be the process that goes through my head. Hope this helps...let me know what you find out. xoxo

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scratch tests for foods are only 50% accurate.

i cannot drink wine because of the sulphites and casein.

and the alcohol.

but otherwise, the aforementioned ingredients.

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i cannot drink wine because of the sulphites and casein.

wow...I had no idea that wine had casein in it. Now I'm really glad I don't drink. :blink:

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Natlay,

Wine inherently does not have casein in it. However, many wineries use casein in the processing. Many also use eggs. (I learned this recently as I am both casein and egg intolerant).

I'm not drinking at all at this point because 1. I haven't had the time to research wines that are safe. 2. I don't know if even "safe" wines are safe for me bc I don't know if I react to sulfites, and other fun things.

Hope this helps.

Laura

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Natlay,

Wine inherently does not have casein in it. However, many wineries use casein in the processing. Many also use eggs. (I learned this recently as I am both casein and egg intolerant).

I'm not drinking at all at this point because 1. I haven't had the time to research wines that are safe. 2. I don't know if even "safe" wines are safe for me bc I don't know if I react to sulfites, and other fun things.

Hope this helps.

Laura

wow i didnt know about the casien thing iether, fortunatly i have a lactose problem so it wont bother me too much hopefully. i wasnt tested for red wine only white which was odd :blink: i dont think i have a problem when drinking white wine but the more you frink the less you care about if you do or not ( so to speak ). i often wonderd if there was a connection between the vinegers and white wines in the malting or whatever you wanna call it. just a thought :unsure:

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Natlay,

Wine inherently does not have casein in it. However, many wineries use casein in the processing. Many also use eggs. (I learned this recently as I am both casein and egg intolerant).

I'm not drinking at all at this point because 1. I haven't had the time to research wines that are safe. 2. I don't know if even "safe" wines are safe for me bc I don't know if I react to sulfites, and other fun things.

Hope this helps.

Laura

If you buy any appellation controlled French wine or DOP Italian then the ingredients are strictly controlled.

An exception is Bordeaux who are pretty lax over the appellations ... then you need to decide if you are buying a quality wine or a cheap one.

Bourgoyne has probably the strictest appellations where several do not allow any yeast to be added and the process has to occur naturally from the fields and winery walls. Aloxe Corton and Clos des Mouches are two examples....

Cote de Rhone wise a hermitage or crozes hermtage are also strictly controlled as is Condrieu

Most if not all good wine (excepting champagnes) are unfiltered and you can pick off whole appellations confident that quality control and following the rules is the livelyhood of the whole appellation.

Try this in the google bar :D

appellation beaune "non filtre"

However the best thing is asking the producers themselves....I really would encourage ANYONE who likes wine to try one of these... they are outstanding value with wines from 4€ a bottle though to €400 ....though you can get exceptional wines starting at 6€ .....November is the BEST time, its the first of the 2005

Lille : Halls Londres/Bruxelles - Lille Grand Palais du 17/11/2006 au 20/11/2006

Dates/horaires :

17-18-19 novembre : 10h-20h

20 novembre : 10h-18h

Prix d'entrée : 6 Euros (includes tasting glass though if you weant Im sure I can get free invites)

or

Paris : Porte de Versailles du 23/11/2006 au 27/11/2006

Dates/horaires :

23-24-25-26 novembre : 10h-20h

27 novembre : 10h-18h

Prix d'entrée : 6 Euros

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Steve - you're talking Euro wines here - average consumer in US is drinking wines from California, if they're American-made. Most people walk into a grocery or liquor store and choose by - not kidding here - what the label looks like and by price - most people want a decent everyday wine for under $10. And, unless we are willing to pay much more per bottle - the wines/appellations are not so strictly controlled. I am always looking for a good cheap Burgundian-style California red, or S. American or Australian red....and because I didn't PAY for wine - usually - for four years (worked at a fantastic winery), I really hate paying for it now! :angry: Also remember that people are buying Charles Shaw ("two-buck Chuck") by the case here - $1.99 a bottle and extremely bad - the white is pure skunk pi**! Blech! The reds taste like - lighter fluid. Charles Shaw is cheap juice from bad grapes, sold and created by Franzia wines - - kind of an abomination but that's what most are drinking.

Reds usually don't bother me, but whites will give me a huge headache. Yeast can be a problem in wines also and almost all are fermented wtih yeast here. Very few CA wines are unfiltered - the unfiltered chardonnays we sold were $45 and $65 per bottle....and while we felt we had bottled the golden rays of heaven (I used to tell customers that Cuvee Audrey was in fact what was poured in heaven ;) ), few could afford it. In the winery where I worked, many yeasts were used and all were purchased from France - I never had a headache from our chardonnays.

I would try some lighter reds, Taz - pinot noirs (almost impossible, though, to find a good one for less than $20 and too bad as that's my fave!), red zinfandel (not always so light but not as heavy as cab/merlot) and syrahs. I'm goign to have to break down and go to Whole Foods to get some of my favorite - used to be my every-day wine at the winery - Kali-Hart Pinot Noir - - it's about $12 and was just so yummy - the best cheap pinot I've ever had - - really wonderful black cherry with just the lightest touch of barnyard/earthiness to it....

*sigh* too bad Whole Foods is so far away or I'd go there now.

edit: having written all of the above...it just occurred to me that Taz might be in...England? oops.....makes everything (almost!) kind of irrelevant.....!!

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susan,

as a wine lover (and so sad that I might not be able to tolerate alcohol...my body is revolting against me at this point), I REALLY appreciate your post! I'll keep those in mind! Thanks for sharing.

Hope that the vegan wine list helps ...

Laura

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Hi Laura....you know, I had completely forgotten about egg whites (powdered) being used as a filtering agent in wines! I am not casein/egg intolerant and so don't even think about that - very good about the vegan wine list. Can't even REMEMBER if Robert Talbott wines (where I worked - that's the Kali Hart Pinot, named for their youngest daughter and SO yummy!) uses egg whites in their filtering. You could call the winery itself in Gonzalez, CA...or email - heck maybe I"ll email them myself just to see what's going on. That is a bummer though and I hope you can enjoy wines again soon....I used to be a heavy consumer of wines :ph34r: and loved them so, now, just a glass here or there and that's much better in so many ways.

:)

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Most if not all good wine (excepting champagnes) are unfiltered and you can pick off whole appellations confident that quality control and following the rules is the livelyhood of the whole appellation.
Serves me right for buying the cheapest sweet white wine at my supermarket yesterday. <_< Luckily I only had less then half a glass but I had unmistakable casein symptoms today....the rest of the wine went down the drain btw...

I haven't bothered with calling producers about wine, most of the time if indeed I stick to not the cheapest ones it seems to be fine. And even when it isn't, the reaction only seems to last a day or so, so I'm thinking that the amount that I'm reacting to must be truly minuscule.

I don't usually like reds, at least in my usual price range :D but someone had given us a bottle of... let me check, I saved the bottle...it says 1999, Mas de l'Ocelle, ok so I know nothing about wine but I really liked that one.

I wonder, I often like verdejo wines, and verdicchio ones, are those the same sort of grape or is it a coincidence that the names are similar? :)

It's funny, I can have a few glasses of a "safe" wine and be fine, and less half a glass of one that apparently contains casein and have a "hangover" the day after... :P

Pauliina

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